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Cycling Shoes + Orthotics = ok?

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Cycling Shoes + Orthotics = ok?

Old 01-01-12, 03:16 PM
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EPICBYTES
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Cycling Shoes + Orthotics = ok?

Is it fine to wear cycling shoes with orthotics?
I am planing getting into clipless world, any info about combining orthotics and shoes will be helpful
Thanks for your time
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Old 01-01-12, 03:19 PM
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Do you need orthodics for cycling? If you have them for running/walking, you most likely don't need them on a bike.
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Old 01-01-12, 03:27 PM
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Agree you probably won't need on a bike because you're not putting weight on your heel and rocking forward onto the ball of your foot as you do walking or running. You're basically always on your toes while riding. Anyway, lot's of people, including my wife, use their orthotics in their cycling shoes.
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Old 01-01-12, 03:33 PM
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The reason having orthotics is my feet is flat, so flat feet is not really problem with cycling shoes?
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Old 01-01-12, 03:44 PM
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the main benefit of my orthotics is the metatarsal bump. AFAIK, they just guessed on that part of the orthotics, so I have been buying metatarsal pads for my cycling shoes. My orthotics were made by Sole, strangely there seems to be no mention of metatarsal bumps on their web site for the aftermarket insoles.

I do ride with my orthotics in my cycling shoes, they are relatively thin and work well
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Old 01-01-12, 04:15 PM
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I ride with orthitic insoles in my cycling shoes. They are more comfortable than the insoles that come with the shoes.

If you use orthotics you'll probably want them for cycling too.
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Old 01-01-12, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
I ride with orthitic insoles in my cycling shoes. They are more comfortable than the insoles that come with the shoes.

If you use orthotics you'll probably want them for cycling too.
+1 this.

I put orthotics in all my shoes, cycling or otherwise.
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Old 01-01-12, 05:33 PM
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Orthotics in cycling shoes are fine. Just need to make sure your particular inserts will fit in the shoes.
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Old 01-01-12, 05:37 PM
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It depends on what type of problem your orthotics are trying to cure. People with flat feet (like my wife) usually get an orthotic with a minor arch built into them. The metatarsal bump that's been mentioned isn't used unless you have the specific forefoot issue that would benefit from it. If you have that need, then it would be a must for cycling, since the forefoot take most of the load.

I have worn orthotics for over 25 years due to some sort of problem, similar to plantar faciitis,that affects the tendon running through the arch. Even with a high arch, I never used or felt the need for orthotics in my cycling shoes. In fact, the only time my feet didn't bother me was when cycling, since the arch and heel see little involvement. In the last few years, I have invested in D2 custom cycling shoes that include a custom orthotic. They've worked quite well, but aren't any miracle and cost a lot. Prior to that, I used Sidi shoes than have a built-in arch support, rather than a flat insole.

One problem with cycling shoes is a lack of room for orthotics. Custom made orthotics for your walking shoes are not likely to fit into a cycling shoes, due to too much volume at the heel (mine don't). I've found a few brands that offer off-the-shelf thin orthotics that work in cycling shoes.

Another type of problem that many riders have never heard of is forefoot varus or valgus. If you have the more common varus, the foot tilts to the outside and put excessive pressure on the outside of the foot. I have the opposite problem, only on the left foot. You can buy Lemond wedges to correct the cleat angle and eliminate the excessive pressure. Some users of speedplay pedals blame the pedals for the uneven wear on the outside edge of the pedal, but the real culprit if forefoot varus. With valgus, the cleat spring wears a groove into the pedal spindle.

Last edited by DaveSSS; 01-01-12 at 05:46 PM.
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Old 01-02-12, 01:13 PM
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Sounds good
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Old 01-02-12, 01:33 PM
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Perhaps a better question would be to ask your LBS how to replicate your foot position in a cycling shoe, rather than working out how to put your current orthotics into a road shoe. I use Specialized road shoes and they already have some varus angle built into the sole. But, yes you do need to ensure proper alignment while cycling, your knees will thank you.
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Old 01-02-12, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Beaker View Post
...I use Specialized road shoes and they already have some varus angle built into the sole.
I'm sure it's beneficial for most but I've been riding a pair of Spec shoes for about a year now and though it's small, I don't like varus wedge compared to my old non-wedge shoes.
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Old 01-02-12, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
It depends on what type of problem your orthotics are trying to cure. People with flat feet (like my wife) usually get an orthotic with a minor arch built into them. The metatarsal bump that's been mentioned isn't used unless you have the specific forefoot issue that would benefit from it. If you have that need, then it would be a must for cycling, since the forefoot take most of the load.

I have worn orthotics for over 25 years due to some sort of problem, similar to plantar faciitis,that affects the tendon running through the arch. Even with a high arch, I never used or felt the need for orthotics in my cycling shoes. In fact, the only time my feet didn't bother me was when cycling, since the arch and heel see little involvement. In the last few years, I have invested in D2 custom cycling shoes that include a custom orthotic. They've worked quite well, but aren't any miracle and cost a lot. Prior to that, I used Sidi shoes than have a built-in arch support, rather than a flat insole.

One problem with cycling shoes is a lack of room for orthotics. Custom made orthotics for your walking shoes are not likely to fit into a cycling shoes, due to too much volume at the heel (mine don't). I've found a few brands that offer off-the-shelf thin orthotics that work in cycling shoes.

Another type of problem that many riders have never heard of is forefoot varus or valgus. If you have the more common varus, the foot tilts to the outside and put excessive pressure on the outside of the foot. I have the opposite problem, only on the left foot. You can buy Lemond wedges to correct the cleat angle and eliminate the excessive pressure. Some users of speedplay pedals blame the pedals for the uneven wear on the outside edge of the pedal, but the real culprit if forefoot varus. With valgus, the cleat spring wears a groove into the pedal spindle.
Good advice here. Forefoot varus/valgus is a pain because in addition to worsening power transfer to the pedal, it limits circulation and causes numb toes on longer rides. That's a big problem in the colder months.

I've tried inserting walking shoe orthotics into my cycling shoes and while they did just barely fit I found that after 10 miles or so I started having pain in my knees that wasn't there with low profile sports insoles. On the flip side, the Superfeet Black insoles that I use in my cycling shoes now are friggin medieval torture devices in a walking shoe.
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Old 01-02-12, 07:34 PM
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I've been wearing orthotics in my walking/running shoes for 20 years and I won't wear shoes without them. They have reformed my feet to where they are suppose to be and supported them. Because of this, I've tried several I've used my walking orthotics in my cycling shoes and also have tried different manufacturers of orthotics specifically for cycling. I was disappointed using my shoe orthotics and thrilled using some of the cycling orthotics though some were not comfortable for me, it didn't mean they are no good and not comfortable for others.
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Old 01-02-12, 08:21 PM
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OP,

First, there's no such condition as flat feet. Your arch appears flat because you over pronate - most likely your big toe is shorter and it allows your foot to roll towards the inside. In effect, you have a normal arch but because your foot rolls in, it looks flat. Orthodics support your foot to keep it from over pronating or rolling in too much.

Since cycling isn't a weight bearing exercise, you likely won't need orthodics riding. But if you do, you will need different ones for cycling - running orthodics are too wide for most bike shoes
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Old 01-02-12, 09:11 PM
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i would guess you wouldn't need them...its not walking /thread
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Old 01-02-12, 09:57 PM
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let me put it this way: if I can fit them in my cycling shoes why not.

I'm thinking of giving up my beautiful Sidis for some ugly Bonts just because of the mouldable feature.

I've found a few brands that offer off-the-shelf thin orthotics that work in cycling shoes.
I'm interested. What brand/s are they?
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Old 01-02-12, 09:59 PM
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Originally Posted by EPICBYTES View Post
The reason having orthotics is my feet is flat, so flat feet is not really problem with cycling shoes?
I have flat feet, and I go with Superfeet insoles instead of the stock insoles that come with the shoes. Get the yellow ones that are made for ice skates and the like (where the ball of your foot is lower than your heel).

http://www.superfeet.com/activity/cycling/Yellow.aspx

I have podiatrist-made orthotics for my street shoes, and Superfeet in my running shoes, ski boots, hockey skates, cycling shoes (Sidi, btw) -- basically everything else...
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