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First road bike, carbon or aluminum ??

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First road bike, carbon or aluminum ??

Old 01-08-12, 08:12 AM
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First road bike, carbon or aluminum ??

Ok now im even more confused...I am looking at a Giant Advanced Defy 4 carbon bike but am reading bad things about frames breaking, scratching etc. I tend to take good care of my stuff but do use bike carriers etc.
I have had mike bike fall over in the garage etc...Just wondered if I would be better served both money and longevity wise going with an aluminum bike with carbon forks....
I am now riding a Fuiji hybrid abot 2800 miles a year....
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Old 01-08-12, 08:16 AM
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Carbon Bikes are alot stronger then these myths make them out to be. Someone like giant will stand behind their bike warranty wise. If you want me to go on a diatribe about what ive done to my carbon bike just tell me.
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Old 01-08-12, 08:17 AM
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Best rule of thumb: don't ride it if you can't replace it.
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Old 01-08-12, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by dnuzzomueller
Carbon Bikes are alot stronger then these myths make them out to be. Someone like giant will stand behind their bike warranty wise. If you want me to go on a diatribe about what ive done to my carbon bike just tell me.
I do recall at least one person here who hit a pot hole and giant wouldn't replace his carbon frame that split into 4.
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Old 01-08-12, 08:19 AM
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Well it will honestly depend on your budget.

If your budget is sub-$2500, go get a really good aluminum frame with good components than a lower end carbon frame with mediocre components.
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Old 01-08-12, 09:36 AM
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it is amazing to me that in 2012 people are still wondering if carbon fiber bicycles are dangerously fragile.

a bike made out of any material will see its life reduced if you don't take care of it.
a modern carbon fiber bike, under normal use, will last longer than you.
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Old 01-08-12, 09:41 AM
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I have been thinking about the same thing for a while. I guess any material as long as it is from a quality company such as Cannondale, Trek, Specialized, Giant etc. should hold up and you do have a lifetime warranty with alot of manufactuers so it might not be too much to worry about. I'm planning on getting my first road bike in a few weeks and the only reason I'm not going with carbon is budget. I would also feel a little nervous riding a $3000+ bike in NYC with the way bikes are stolen here.
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Old 01-08-12, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by richard4993
I would also feel a little nervous riding a $3000+ bike in NYC with the way bikes are stolen here.
Riding, no problem. But locking up a carbon frame, or any bike worth more than $1000 in NYC, is madness.
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Old 01-08-12, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by AEO
Best rule of thumb: don't ride it if you can't replace it.
1+

addition to this: dont be cheap with yourself, think of a max price you are willing to pay, add 500 to that...thats your budget.

whats your budget?

edit: dont use this bike for commuting....i NEVER lock my road bike, because im riding, standing besides it, or its inside my house
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Old 01-08-12, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by richard4993
I guess any material as long as it is from a quality company such as Cannondale, Trek, Specialized, Giant etc.
right, because everyone knows their factories are different from those "other" companies.
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Old 01-08-12, 10:17 AM
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Aluminum breaks, too.

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Old 01-08-12, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by emveezee
Riding, no problem. But locking up a carbon frame, or any bike worth more than $1000 in NYC, is madness.
I really wouldn't plan on locking a road bike once I buy mine but the thing that worries me is leaving it with a cheap lock fior the minute or so I'm in the restroom or making a quick stop during my ride. I guess I could use my Kryptonite locl but that thing will add and extra 10 pounds to me.
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Old 01-08-12, 10:29 AM
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You might find that there are some nice steel bikes in your price range - look at Jamis. For a first road bike, the prices are very reasonable for 105 equipped bikes, and they bike weights are sub-20#.
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Old 01-08-12, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by david58
some nice steel bikes
Crabon is stronger and better than steel in every single way ever. Aluminum is a close second.
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Old 01-08-12, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by DXchulo
Aluminum breaks, too.
As does steel





The copy from the Oops website for the last picture reads

Expensive Koga's are not immune from problems, and the guarantee didn't extend to the second owner!
The crack has started from the sharp point of the bottom lug. From the rust at the bottom section you see it has been awhile and the crack could possible have been spotted before total collapse. The crack took some time untill the remaining section couldn't handle the strain and snapped.
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Old 01-08-12, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Inertianinja
right, because everyone knows their factories are different from those "other" companies.
Uh...yes, they are.

And...believe it or not, factories are capable of producing more than 1 thing at time. In fact, they can produce a whole range of items that have very different characteristics and levels of quality.


No, really!
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Old 01-08-12, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by wkg
Crabon is stronger and better than steel in every single way ever. Aluminum is a close second.
This is so not true.
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Old 01-08-12, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by RJM
This is so not true.
Let's put it to the test!

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Old 01-08-12, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by cvcman
Ok now im even more confused...I am looking at a Giant Advanced Defy 4 carbon bike but am reading bad things about frames breaking, scratching etc. I tend to take good care of my stuff but do use bike carriers etc.
I have had mike bike fall over in the garage etc...Just wondered if I would be better served both money and longevity wise going with an aluminum bike with carbon forks....
I am now riding a Fuiji hybrid abot 2800 miles a year....
For a given price point, you'll be able to get better components and wheels with an aluminum frame. The aluminum frame will not hold you back, whether you want to race or do centuries or just ride. IMO, the difference in components is more important than the frame material, assuming both frames are well made. If you've got $1500-2000 for a bike, go for aluminum. In that range, you're looking at upper-end aluminum versus lower-end carbon, and I'd rather have upper-end aluminum.
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Old 01-08-12, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by RJM
This is so not true.
It's true. It's science, maf, biology or what have you. Crabon is best.
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Old 01-08-12, 11:58 AM
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not sure what "crabon" is but if you ment carbon I will tell you what, give me a steel tube and a carbon tube and a hammer, in one hit I can break the carbon, not the steel.
Also if I scratch the steel I dont have to seal it up so it doesnt delaminate.. Now from what I know ( which is little) about carbon I agree its strong but not like steel
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Old 01-08-12, 01:26 PM
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Who cares. Bikes are built to withstand riding them. Whether or not thay can withstand hammer strikes isn't a valid way to judge the material.
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Old 01-08-12, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by cvcman
not sure what "crabon" is but if you ment carbon I will tell you what, give me a steel tube and a carbon tube and a hammer, in one hit I can break the carbon, not the steel.
Also if I scratch the steel I dont have to seal it up so it doesnt delaminate.. Now from what I know ( which is little) about carbon I agree its strong but not like steel
I can smash an aluminum pop can on my head. Does that mean it is the weakest out of all three? Using your example, then yes.
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Old 01-08-12, 02:16 PM
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Humm well aluminum bike frames are MUCH thicker than aluminum pop cans and by the way, you may want to lay off smashing things on your head, its not doing you any good I was trying to make a point that steel will withstand blunt force better than carbon, the guy above said carbon is better in every aspect !
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Old 01-08-12, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by cvcman
Humm well aluminum bike frames are MUCH thicker than aluminum pop cans and by the way, you may want to lay off smashing things on your head, its not doing you any good I was trying to make a point that steel will withstand blunt force better than carbon, the guy above said carbon is better in every aspect !
Actually the point should be - why should withstanding blunt force matter in a bike? Whether a bike is made of steel, aluminum, or carbon, if you suffer a hammer strike or a similar force of that magnitude there will be damage to that bike regardless of what it's made out of, and you won't want to ride it anyway without it getting replaced/repaired.

Comparing scenarios that are completely out of spec to what a particular object is made for doesn't make much sense. Unless you regularly beat on your bike with a hammer.
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