Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Are titanium skewers safe for everyday, longterm use?

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Are titanium skewers safe for everyday, longterm use?

Old 03-24-12, 12:02 PM
  #1  
sfnorton
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Are titanium skewers safe for everyday, longterm use?

I just bought a set of Bontrager X Lite clinchers and am going to get the Bontrager RXL skewers. These skewers are made from titanium and are half the weight of the steel ones. But I'm wondering if titanium skewers are safe over the long run? Nothing scares me more than thinking of losing a front wheel at speed.
sfnorton is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 12:08 PM
  #2  
KypD
Senior Member
 
KypD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 125

Bikes: LeMond Zurich

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm no PRO myself or anything...but one thing always sticks out in my mind when people talk about such miniscule weight savings. Why not just take one water bottle instead of two? Boom! Instant savings!

edit: Ti is more corrosion resistant than steel....I can't see why it wouldn't be safe. Maybe someone else here who uses them can chime in with a more educated answer.
KypD is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 12:14 PM
  #3  
sfnorton
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by KypD View Post
I'm no PRO myself or anything...but one thing always sticks out in my mind when people talk about such miniscule weight savings. Why not just take one water bottle instead of two? Boom! Instant savings!

edit: Ti is more corrosion resistant than steel....I can't see why it wouldn't be safe. Maybe someone else here who uses them can chime in with a more educated answer.
I'm not really a super weight weenie but these are the skewers that normally come with the RXL wheels. The wheels I bought are coming with no skewers but I thought it would be nice to pair them with the RXL skewers. I've heard that titanium might not be as stong as steel, especially where stretching is concerned. These will be my everyday wheels. I'm hoping that what I have heard about titanium is wrong.
sfnorton is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 12:20 PM
  #4  
Shimagnolo
Senior Member
 
Shimagnolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Zang's Spur, CO
Posts: 8,935
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2421 Post(s)
Liked 2,099 Times in 1,084 Posts
I've never heard of any problem with Ti skewers.
Two of my bikes have them.
Shimagnolo is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 12:36 PM
  #5  
botto 
.
 
botto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 40,373
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by sfnorton View Post
I just bought a set of Bontrager X Lite clinchers and am going to get the Bontrager RXL skewers. These skewers are made from titanium and are half the weight of the steel ones. But I'm wondering if titanium skewers are safe over the long run? Nothing scares me more than thinking of losing a front wheel at speed.
then don't waste your money on something as idiotic as "lightweight" skewers.
botto is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 01:05 PM
  #6  
Syncmaster
GO, Mordecai!
 
Syncmaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 817
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I haven't had any issues with my Ti Skewers.... They're strong, reliable and actually save quite a bit of weight.
Syncmaster is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 01:07 PM
  #7  
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,633

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1053 Post(s)
Liked 464 Times in 335 Posts
Originally Posted by KypD View Post
I'm no PRO myself or anything...but one thing always sticks out in my mind when people talk about such miniscule weight savings. Why not just take one water bottle instead of two? Boom! Instant savings!

edit: Ti is more corrosion resistant than steel....I can't see why it wouldn't be safe. Maybe someone else here who uses them can chime in with a more educated answer.
That's a good idea. Maybe I won't eat for 4 hours before a ride to keep my weight down. And leave the spare tubes at home.

I'm waiting for some weight weenie to notice my old school Campy skewer on my Zipp 404 front wheel. No wonder I couldn't pass that guy in the sprint today.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: https://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html

Last edited by Homebrew01; 03-24-12 at 01:41 PM.
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 01:12 PM
  #8  
LowCel 
Throw the stick!!!!
 
LowCel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Charleston, WV
Posts: 18,120

Bikes: GMC Denali

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
Liked 40 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by KypD View Post
I'm no PRO myself or anything...but one thing always sticks out in my mind when people talk about such miniscule weight savings. Why not just take one water bottle instead of two? Boom! Instant savings!

edit: Ti is more corrosion resistant than steel....I can't see why it wouldn't be safe. Maybe someone else here who uses them can chime in with a more educated answer.
Because some of us go out for several hours and may not pass a store the entire ride. Routes like these are usually the best routes to ride.
__________________
I may be fat but I'm slow enough to make up for it.
LowCel is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 01:21 PM
  #9  
achoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,700
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by LowCel View Post
Because some of us go out for several hours and may not pass a store the entire ride. Routes like these are usually the best routes to ride.
And those of us who do pass a store may not want to wuss out and have to stop.
achoo is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 01:46 PM
  #10  
KypD
Senior Member
 
KypD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 125

Bikes: LeMond Zurich

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
haha, it was a joke people. I'm just saying if you're searching and scrambling for that extra few ounces shaved off, and paying hundreds of dollars for something (in my mind) so silly, do something equally silly but cheaper.

FYI, half the time I ride I have a Camelbak strapped on for exactly the reasons you guys mentioned. Half of my rides are out in the boonies, with water sources few and far between.
KypD is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 02:03 PM
  #11  
weaver
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Ellensburg, WA
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You know, if you're skewer fails at speed, your wheel's not going anywhere. Unless you feel the urge to bunny hop it that is.
weaver is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 02:15 PM
  #12  
Hairy Hands
Senior Member
 
Hairy Hands's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Magnolia, Texas
Posts: 300

Bikes: Colnago C50, Specialized TriCross Carbon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I weigh 230 lbs and have Ti/Ti on one bike and Ti/Alum skewers on the other.. Both are in the range of 5 yrs old and I put 10,000 miles annually on between the two bikes. No problems. My guess is the manufacturers would not sell them if they felt they were not safe.
Hairy Hands is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 03:55 PM
  #13  
sfnorton
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Many thanks for the replies. The non-hostile ones especially!
sfnorton is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 04:02 PM
  #14  
bobonker
Member
 
bobonker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 825
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I run KCNC Z6 steel skewers. They aren't as light as the Ti version, but they are still about half the weight of a regular steel set.

One thing that is very important is that you get them on tight. This seems obvious, but many lightweight skewers have a much smaller and/or shorter handle, so getting it as tight as a regular skewer is harder to do since the handle is shorter and skinnier. If you judge tightness by the amount of pain inflicted on your palm, fingers, then the lightweight ones should inflict quite a bit more pain.

Bob
bobonker is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 04:13 PM
  #15  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 34,899

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 487 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14660 Post(s)
Liked 2,951 Times in 1,499 Posts
I think they are fine, especially if you use a reliable manufacturer. I use KCNC. I have heard there are some counterfeit KCNC and other off-brand ones...maybe they are OK but I don't know if I would trust them.

I know it's kinda silly but these are a fairly cheap way to knock some weight off. Many of us have an inner weight-weenie, silly as it is.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is online now  
Old 03-24-12, 04:32 PM
  #16  
BillyD
Administrator
 
BillyD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Posts: 28,984

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene '04; Bridgestone RB-1 '92

Mentioned: 306 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8684 Post(s)
Liked 2,335 Times in 1,308 Posts
Originally Posted by Hairy Hands View Post
My guess is the manufacturers would not sell them if they felt they were not safe.
Good one.
__________________
See, this is why we can't have nice things. - - smarkinson
Where else but the internet can a bunch of cyclists go and be the tough guy? - - jdon
BillyD is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 08:55 PM
  #17  
Mansram01
Senior Member
 
Mansram01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 1,344

Bikes: '17 Trek Emonda, '16 Yeti ASR5, '14 Cdale F29 '08 Orbea Orca.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have three sets of KCNC. Never had ANY issues with them. I did have my worries a few years back because they were/are so light but they appear to be very reliable.
Mansram01 is offline  
Old 03-24-12, 10:15 PM
  #18  
Mr. Fly
Senior Member
 
Mr. Fly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Silicon Valley, CA.
Posts: 662
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mchacon01 View Post
I have three sets of KCNC.
Originally Posted by datlas View Post
I use KCNC.
Originally Posted by bobonker View Post
I run KCNC Z6 steel skewers.
There seems to be a lot of KCNC users here. I don't have any concerns about the Ti skewers as Ti has been used for this function for a long time without significant reports of failure (late 80's/early 90's Salsa skewers anyone?) However, those KCNC skewer "nuts" are tiny and made of aluminum. I've used Al nuts in RC cars before and they are not the most reliable. Worse yet, they often crack without much warning. While that failure mode is just annoying for an RC car, it may be catastrophic for a skewer. I don't know why KCNC do not put more material there. Maybe they've done their testing and deemed it OK, but Shimano and Campagnolo (who I trust to do more testing) seem to have put much more material there.
Mr. Fly is offline  
Old 03-25-12, 01:30 PM
  #19  
VELOGLOCK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 70

Bikes: 2007 Trek Navigator 3.0 2008 Specialized Sequoia Elite

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Ti = half the weight of Al , twice the strength of Steel........Allegedly , I woudn't be concerned
if there were an issue it would be well known , on this interwhatyamaycallit
VELOGLOCK is offline  
Old 03-25-12, 07:51 PM
  #20  
wants185s
wants185s
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Burr Ridge, IL
Posts: 176

Bikes: Cannondale 2003 Caad 4

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr. Fly View Post
There seems to be a lot of KCNC users here. I don't have any concerns about the Ti skewers as Ti has been used for this function for a long time without significant reports of failure (late 80's/early 90's Salsa skewers anyone?) However, those KCNC skewer "nuts" are tiny and made of aluminum. I've used Al nuts in RC cars before and they are not the most reliable. Worse yet, they often crack without much warning. While that failure mode is just annoying for an RC car, it may be catastrophic for a skewer. I don't know why KCNC do not put more material there. Maybe they've done their testing and deemed it OK, but Shimano and Campagnolo (who I trust to do more testing) seem to have put much more material there.
I read this thread yesterday and almost added a positive comment. Today I discovered my front Ti skewer was broken. The round "nut" in the lever side had cracked. A few days ago I noticed my front wheel was loose. I tightened the non-lever side nut and reclamped it. It seemed to hold but I was hearing a faint noise. Upon investigation I found the cracked nut. I will try another set but I will be extremely careful to make sure I have the threads on both ends of the skewer properly engaged and that I set the tightness such that the force to close the lever is not too high.
wants185s is offline  
Old 03-26-12, 09:11 AM
  #21  
mrardo
Senior Member
 
mrardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Las Cruces NM
Posts: 210

Bikes: Trek 6.9, Davinci touring, Mountain bike and a Trek tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Has anyone broken the titanium shaft of a skewer while riding? I have never heard of this happening. The levers and nuts are usually not titanium and if they fail it's from over tightening.
mrardo is offline  
Old 03-26-12, 09:14 AM
  #22  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 21,749
Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14059 Post(s)
Liked 5,167 Times in 2,930 Posts
Originally Posted by KypD View Post
I'm no PRO myself or anything...but one thing always sticks out in my mind when people talk about such miniscule weight savings. Why not just take one water bottle instead of two? Boom! Instant savings!
If you want to save even more weight, you can take no water at all, and if that isn't enough, don't eat for a week. Hey, this is all fun and games until you start amputating.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 03-26-12, 09:47 AM
  #23  
Ultraslide
Senior Member
 
Ultraslide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Evansville, IN
Posts: 782

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Supercourse, 99 Specialized Stumpjumer, 08 LeMond Tourmalet

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've been running light Ti skewers for a while, no problems. The cost of weight savings per gram is better than most components.
Ultraslide is offline  
Old 03-26-12, 07:11 PM
  #24  
kf9yr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 322

Bikes: 2011 Serotta Ottrott, Serotta TI Road Bike, Serotta TI MTB,Ritchey Breakaway Ti Cross, Trek Rumblefish Pro, Cannondale Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by VELOGLOCK View Post
Ti = half the weight of Al , twice the strength of Steel........Allegedly , I woudn't be concerned
if there were an issue it would be well known , on this interwhatyamaycallit
Titanium is strong and light but not as light as Al and about the same strength as steel. I'm not maligning Ti, I have two all-Ti bikes and a Ti/Carbon one...

https://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele022.html

From the web page above:

Titanium is a strong, light metal. It is as strong as steel and twice as strong as aluminum, but is 45% lighter than steel and only 60% heavier than aluminum. Titanium is not easily corroded by sea water and is used in propeller shafts, rigging and other parts of boats that are exposed to sea water. Titanium and titanium alloys are used in airplanes, missiles and rockets where strength, low weight and resistance to high temperatures are important.
kf9yr is offline  
Old 03-26-12, 08:02 PM
  #25  
Commodus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 4,144
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I just can't bring myself to trust skewers without the internal cam. It's probably nonsense, but there it is. If you want to never have any questions or concerns about your skewers, ever again, buy some Shimano DA jobbies and go back to enjoying life.
Commodus is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.