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Do U trust tire patch

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Do U trust tire patch

Old 06-06-12, 08:13 AM
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Shimagnolo, I didn't say I can't do what you're suggesting. It's just that my principle is that I want to do things right the first time. My time has been compromised by the flat anyway so why not take the time needed to get things right? And you didn't address the issue of the debris that could possibly be still inside your tire.

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Old 06-06-12, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Phantoj
If you are a "patcher" you can check the tire for debris while you wait for the cement to dry (what else are you going to do?)
In my personal experience, the debris that were causing me to flat in the past were not those foreign objects that were stuck on the tire and puncturing the tube. It's those metal shards that look like foil and they move around the wheel depending on the gravity. They do look like tin foils and they're very small, maybe no more than 2mm, but when you feel them with your fingers they're quite sharp. Now this specific debris can't just be easily located if you're doing a shortcut with your repair 'coz they move around.

Everybody has their own experiences with their flats. I'm just sharing mine.

Last edited by Shinjukan; 06-06-12 at 08:22 AM.
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Old 06-06-12, 08:40 AM
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In my experience, sometimes the cause of the flat is easily spotted, and sometimes its not.

I had a tiny shard once that was buried in the rubber and couldn't be seen. I only found it but turning the tire inside out and running my finger over the inside while pressing the outside with my other hand. When the tire flexed just right, I felt something prick my thumb.
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Old 06-06-12, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Shinjukan
I like this tip. But here's a question: What should one do if they found out that they didn't patch it thoroughly and that there's a leak? Should they rip the patch thereby risking making the whole thing worse?

Somebody also suggested using Acetone on the area around the hole before applying the glue (or the glueless patch) and then the patch. The idea behind it was to thoroughly clean the area around the hole from any powder-like substance that came with the tube that enables it to slide easier when mounting to the tire.
I've learned t hat I probably didn't center the patch on correctly and was bubblig from the edge, I simply apply a second patch on top of the other patch. Works well.
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Old 06-06-12, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Phantoj
If you are a "patcher" you can check the tire for debris while you wait for the cement to dry (what else are you going to do?)
I don't use cement on the road.
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Old 06-06-12, 09:14 AM
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I carry two tubes at all times and I don't patch on the road unless it's my third flat for the ride, and yes, that has happened.

I take the punctured tube home with me and every once in a while I take the time to patch them properly. After they are patched, I leave them for 24 hours. I then inflate them, and leave them for another 24 hours to check for any air loss. When I verify there is no loss, I deflate them, roll them up, and put them in the pile of spare tubes.

When done like this, I have never had a patched tube leak at the patch.

I understand the cost/benefit of using new tubes, especially if you buy them in bulk and on sale, but it's just a waste to toss them. Most of the guys I ride with only use new tubes when they flat, and give me their punctured tubes. I patch them and am more than happy to pass out patched tubes to riders in need at no charge, sometimes even to the guys who gave me the tubes in the first place

To each their own I guess, but take the time to learn how to patch, you never know when that ride will come along where the number of flats you get is the amount of spare tubes you have + 1
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Old 06-06-12, 09:30 AM
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I cut my patches in half and the boot sized patch in six pieces. Patches rock.
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Old 06-06-12, 10:04 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by pallen
In my experience, sometimes the cause of the flat is easily spotted, and sometimes its not.

I had a tiny shard once that was buried in the rubber and couldn't be seen. I only found it but turning the tire inside out and running my finger over the inside while pressing the outside with my other hand. When the tire flexed just right, I felt something prick my thumb.
I had a tiny piece of wire once that drove me crazy until I finally found it. And it took bending the tire in all sorts of ways to expose it.
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Old 06-06-12, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by caloso
I had a tiny piece of wire once that drove me crazy until I finally found it. And it took bending the tire in all sorts of ways to expose it.
Does no one else inflate a tube and stick it in a garbage can filled with water to find those "slow" leaks??? I can't be the only one...
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Old 06-06-12, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Scorer75
Does no one else inflate a tube and stick it in a garbage can filled with water to find those "slow" leaks??? I can't be the only one...
I have one hanging behind me here at work right now that is about to get dunked. Usually the tube gets inflated to a good level of fatness then passed by my shaven calf to feel the leak.

I can't be the only one...
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Old 06-06-12, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Scorer75
Does no one else inflate a tube and stick it in a garbage can filled with water to find those "slow" leaks??? I can't be the only one...
I haven't had to do that since I was a kid. With enough air in the tube I've been able to find the holes. Add a little spit for confirmation.
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Old 06-06-12, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by pallen
In my experience, sometimes the cause of the flat is easily spotted, and sometimes its not.
I agree. I am pretty neurotic, and unless I can find the culprit shard, I don't feel comfortable putting a new tube or patched tube back on. I usually will take the tire off completely and carefully inspect the inside of the tire (bending it as I go) to find and remove the bad actor.

Obviously this does not apply to those rare pinch ("snakebite") flats.
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Old 06-06-12, 05:19 PM
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I heard you can pass a cotton wad into the tire to find the wire, shard, etc.
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Old 06-06-12, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Reynolds
I heard you can pass a cotton wad into the tire to find the wire, shard, etc.
I have heard this but never actually tried it. I usually use my finger for a pass or two, and if I can't feel the source, pop the tire out and inspect it more carefully.

Has anyone actually used the cotton trick? Does it work??
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Old 06-06-12, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by datlas
That means the "old fashioned" type, where you rough up the tube, apply vulcanizing fluid ("cement"), blow it until the shiny part appears dull, then put on a patch and rub the back of the patch with a coin (or your nail).

The self-stick patches are NOT permanent and are designed just to get you home.
Ok, so please confirm for my n00bness because I was at REI and looking at patch kits and was confused.

Something like this patch kit is what you're talking about? Is the worry about the glue drying out worth it? Should I the glueless kind and patch when I get home? (Or incase the glue is bad?) And can you get the glueless kind off to properly patch?

Oh, and to compare: What is considered a "good" price for tubes? I.e. how much are they if it's a good sale?

Last edited by JakiChan; 06-06-12 at 06:06 PM.
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Old 06-06-12, 06:33 PM
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sure, but i prefer duct tape its more reliable and comes in a roll.
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Old 06-06-12, 06:50 PM
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JakiChan, there are 2 types of patches.

The one you linked to is the permanent type, and IMO is the preferred type. The so-called cement is really vulcanizing fluid. If you use the tube once, there is a slight chance the fluid in the tube will dry or evaporate and not be there next time, but that's rare.

The other type is pre-glued patches. Faster, just peel and stick. But these are not permanent. They will get you home though.

I hope that helps!
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Old 06-06-12, 06:53 PM
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A word of warning on the self-adhesive patches;
The one time I tried one in near-freezing weather, it let go after only a mile.
In warmer weather, they have always held until I got home.
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Old 06-06-12, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by datlas
The one you linked to is the permanent type, and IMO is the preferred type. The so-called cement is really vulcanizing fluid. If you use the tube once, there is a slight chance the fluid in the tube will dry or evaporate and not be there next time, but that's rare.

The other type is pre-glued patches. Faster, just peel and stick. But these are not permanent. They will get you home though.
Do you carry the vulcanizing type on the bike for field repairs, or just use them at home and rely on the pre-glued ones for field repairs? Thanks!
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Old 06-07-12, 05:44 AM
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Originally Posted by JakiChan
Do you carry the vulcanizing type on the bike for field repairs, or just use them at home and rely on the pre-glued ones for field repairs? Thanks!
Either way is ok.

Many folks use the preglued ones for the road as they are faster and more compact. Others don't mind taking a couple extra minutes and use the vulcanizing kit so they get a permanent fix the first time.

It's more a personal preference.
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Old 06-07-12, 07:15 AM
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I'd say skip the preglued ones and just use the vulcanizing ones. Seriously, it takes trivially longer to put on the vulcanizing patch - the glue dries in less than 30 seconds, for real, and you get a PERMANENT, reliable fix. It will take far longer for you to check your tire for the puncture shard than it will to apply and have the glue dry.

Unfortunately, I've found that on the road, the biggest deterrent by far to using patches (as awesome as they are), is finding that pinhole puncture on the road. It can be incredibly frustrating to do so without a real pump to get the air into the tube with enough volume to find the puncture. This is why I never patch on road, and only do it at home. (I do still carry a patch kit for worst of luck days, but even on a day where I did need it and had 2 flats, it took me nearly 20 minutes to find the friggin' hole. I would have called for a ride but wife was out at work that day. Totally sucked.)
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Old 06-07-12, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by hhnngg1
I'd say skip the preglued ones and just use the vulcanizing ones. Seriously, it takes trivially longer to put on the vulcanizing patch - the glue dries in less than 30 seconds, for real, and you get a PERMANENT, reliable fix. It will take far longer for you to check your tire for the puncture shard than it will to apply and have the glue dry.

Unfortunately, I've found that on the road, the biggest deterrent by far to using patches (as awesome as they are), is finding that pinhole puncture on the road. It can be incredibly frustrating to do so without a real pump to get the air into the tube with enough volume to find the puncture. This is why I never patch on road, and only do it at home. (I do still carry a patch kit for worst of luck days, but even on a day where I did need it and had 2 flats, it took me nearly 20 minutes to find the friggin' hole. I would have called for a ride but wife was out at work that day. Totally sucked.)
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Old 06-07-12, 07:59 AM
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If you lived here with me in the land of broken glass and goat heads you too would live on patches.
I buy a box of 100 and it's lasts 18 months or so. Of course, I also patch my wife's flats, and she rides a ton.
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Old 06-07-12, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by cccorlew
If you lived here with me in the land of broken glass and goat heads you too would live on patches.
I buy a box of 100 and it's lasts 18 months or so. Of course, I also patch my wife's flats, and she rides a ton.
Good point. The economics of patching makes more sense when you aren't the only cyclist in the family. I have two bikes, my wife has 3 and my kids each have a bike. If I bought a new tube each time one of them got a flat, it could get expensive.
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