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Why don't I want a full suspension mountain bike for road use?

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Why don't I want a full suspension mountain bike for road use?

Old 07-12-12, 07:09 AM
  #51  
leona88
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Sounds like a good idea thanks
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Old 07-12-12, 07:11 AM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by LowCel View Post
Then what would I have to scratch my head about all day?
Pcad can call you fat on Facebook.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:11 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by JakiChan View Post
He's insisting that a rear suspension would make my butt happier, and that's a worthy tradeoff. The guy does ride a lot - 130+ miles/day on an MTB with road tires and he's passing road bikes all the times. Or so he claims.
Hmm. I did a few brevets (200k, 300k, 400k) this year. Not that there were many riders at these events but none of them were using suspension mountain bikes (a few of them where using single speeds). Your friend's opinion appears to be not a very popular one. You might think that, it it was correct, people would have already figured it out.

Note that you provide some of the suspension on a road bike: on bumpy roads, you get off of the seat and use your legs as shock absorbers.

Note, too, that racing road bikes are not the only type of road bike. Wider tires are more comfortable (but very few people would use mountain bike tires).
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Old 07-12-12, 07:11 AM
  #54  
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I don't think you can justifiy a full-suspension bike on the grounds of pure efficiency, but I've experimented quite a bit. I've ridden road bikes on trails (not much fun, but necessary as it was the only bike I had) and I've done road rides on mountain bikes both rigid and suspended. My favorite was the ride on the full-suspension bike.

I read an article some time back about a full-suspension road-racing bike in the 1970s. It was an experiment for a race that included a very rough cobblestone road, and it worked until it broke. Maintenance headache. I learned the same: a full-suspension bike is expensive to operate. So, I've gone back to doing my road rides on what amounts to a rigid mountain bike on big road tires. It may be slow, but it's comfortable and fast enough for me.

It really doesn't matter what anyone else says, or how many riders pass me, or how many I pass. What matters is the riding. I know there are those who set great store by absolute performance, but my preference is for an all-rounder. Ride on.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:13 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by Doug5150 View Post
Road bikes would be better (more comfortable) with suspension.
I think eventually they'll have it, but not for a number of years yet.
And some people will hate it and think it's "unnecessary", rather like the people who only ride solid-tire penny-farthings even now.

Most MTB hardware is way overkill for road use however; all you really need is 1/2 to maybe 1" of travel (not including sag) and simple elastomers would work. Expensive coil-over shocks aren't necessary.
In practical terms, a mild MTB fork and a Thudbuster seatpost are about as close as you can get. And there will be drawbacks, some may be curable acceptably and some not. Ya don't know until you try.

...snip...

Apparently there's a LOT of people out there just like you--who feel that riding a normal bicycle is too painful to enjoy. There isn't anything wrong with insisting your leisure activities have a minimum of physical pain involved.
Klein had a road bike with a suspension joint at the top of the seat stay. The chain stay would flex, and the rubber mount on the chain stay was supposed to soak up the bumps.

It never really caught on.

Klein Reve X

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Old 07-12-12, 07:20 AM
  #56  
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Sounds like he is defending his own preference. Many of us have both types of bikes simply because they excel at different things.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:27 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by Lord Chaos View Post
I've ridden road bikes on trails (not much fun, but necessary as it was the only bike I had)
Riding single track on a road bike can be a lot of fun. Admittedly it's not going to be the tool of choice, but the challenge of doing it is fun, and will definitely make you a better bike handler.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:31 AM
  #58  
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when I first started getting serious about non-offroad riding I was taking my Trek Session 77 for rides on the road, that 42lb ***** was an absolute ****ing nightmare once you got past about 2-3 miles, the thing could roll thru potholes that would swallow lesser machines, but huffing that thing up even moderate 1-2% grades was an exercise in futility if you wanted to maintain any kind of pace. my next bicycle was a hardtail trek mtb, better, but still horribly bad in the wind, succumbed to buying a road bike and I can't believe it took so long for me to do so

OP: your friend is an idiot, as has been said repeatedly thru the thread. the only way to fix this is to get yourself a road bike and crush his soul on a ride.

Last edited by LowCel; 07-12-12 at 07:34 AM. Reason: Bypassing bad word filter, hurt it's feelings, had to fix spelling.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Velo Gator View Post
Pcad can call you fat on Facebook.
That's nothing to scratch my head about, that is expected and unfortunately correct.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by bonz50 View Post
the only way to fix this is to get yourself a road bike and crush his soul on a ride.
There ya go.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:34 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by pgjackson View Post
He is a liar. 130 miles a day?
+1, no reason in going any further. Unless, of course, he is a pro and that's what he does for a living. In which case, we're all wrong.
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Old 07-12-12, 07:36 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by himespau View Post
+1, no reason in going any further. Unless, of course, he is a pro and that's what he does for a living. In which case, we're all wrong.
a pro on a road bike would still pwn his a$$
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Old 07-12-12, 07:52 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
Klein had a road bike with a suspension joint at the top of the seat stay. The chain stay would flex, and the rubber mount on the chain stay was supposed to soak up the bumps.

It never really caught on.

Klein Reve X
Cannondale had one, too, the Silk Road. Years ago when I saw these on a century that featured rough roads I thought I would get one. I was riding the stiffest bike ever at the time, however.
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Old 07-12-12, 08:42 AM
  #64  
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Your friend is dumb. Nuclear winter dumb. Zombie Apocalypse dumb. In fact, he's dumber than simple dumb. He's dense. He's so dense that nearby objects are drawn to him. He's black hole dense. He's so dense that even dumbness can't escape from him. He's way over the event horizon dense. He's singularity dense. He is one fart short of a quantum ripple that would destroy the universe forever dense. He's so dense that Schrodinger's cat would rather be blown to pieces by the hand grenade than coming out of the black box and having to confront your friend.

But he sounds nice enough.
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Old 07-12-12, 08:52 AM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by JakiChan View Post
I made that point - using my current hybrid as an example. His response was that those positions don't have your hands on the brakes, which he thinks they should be at all times.
I don't disagree with the folks here - I do want a road bike. I just want to be able to back up my telling him to STFU.
Another falsehood. I want my hands right near the brakes when in traffic, going down steep windy roads, and other situations where I am likely to need to slow down or stop quickly. The other 99% of my ride I move my hands to whatever part of the bars is suitable at the time.
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Old 07-12-12, 08:55 AM
  #66  
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Mr. OP's Friend, what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this thread is now dumber for having read it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.
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Old 07-12-12, 09:00 AM
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Well, I had the right idea, but the wrong era. Conceptual memory is good but a bit off in the timeline; it was actually the 1990s that brought out some experiments for the Paris-Roubaix race.

http://www.bikehugger.com/post/view/...eaks-on-parade

And then there are Alex Moulton's unique bikes, which incorporate his own version of full suspension.

Comfort and speed have to balance at a point you prefer.
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Old 07-12-12, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
Mr. OP's Friend, what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this thread is now dumber for having read it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.
In my experience, when an individual brings up a contrarian belief which is sure to incur the ridicule of his peers, they almost always refer to those beliefs as those of their "friend".
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Old 07-12-12, 09:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Lord Chaos View Post
Well, I had the right idea, but the wrong era. Conceptual memory is good but a bit off in the timeline; it was actually the 1990s that brought out some experiments for the Paris-Roubaix race.

http://www.bikehugger.com/post/view/...eaks-on-parade

And then there are Alex Moulton's unique bikes, which incorporate his own version of full suspension.

Comfort and speed have to balance at a point you prefer.
and after a fair amount of experimenting with setups for Paris Roubaix over 100 years or so, the answer appears to be a road bike, without suspension, but a bit rleaxed geometry, and wide tubular tires run at a bit lower pressure.

If you want a comfortable ride over rough roads that can be accomplished on a road bike, just with wider tires, and a bit of relaxed geometry, which will still smoke a full suspension MTB.
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Old 07-12-12, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
and after a fair amount of experimenting with setups for Paris Roubaix over 100 years or so, the answer appears to be a road bike, without suspension, but a bit rleaxed geometry, and wide tubular tires run at a bit lower pressure.

If you want a comfortable ride over rough roads that can be accomplished on a road bike, just with wider tires, and a bit of relaxed geometry, which will still smoke a full suspension MTB.
fwiw, cancellara used a "suspension" bike at the tour of flanders this year, as well as the tour de france.

i bet we see more high end road bikes with lightweight, elastic/carbon flex suspensions.
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Old 07-12-12, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by fly:yes/land:no View Post
fwiw, cancellara used a "suspension" bike at the tour of flanders this year, as well as the tour de france.

i bet we see more high end road bikes with lightweight, elastic/carbon flex suspensions.
A little bit of flex in Trek's Iso speed system is a pretty far cry from a full suspension MTB.


It appears that the Domane has 12mm more vertical compliance than a Madone.

http://road.cc/content/news/56064-tr...spension-video
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Old 07-12-12, 09:49 AM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
Mr. OP's Friend, what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this thread is now dumber for having read it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.
Uh... Okay. The Industrial Revolution to me is just like a story I know called "The Puppy Who Lost His Way." The world was changing, and the puppy was getting... bigger.
[
Later]
So, you see, the puppy was like industry. In that, they were both lost in the woods. And nobody, especially the little boy - "society" - knew where to find 'em. Except that the puppy was a dog. But the industry, my friends, that was a revolution.
[Long pause]
Knibb High football rules!
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Old 07-12-12, 09:50 AM
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While some mountain bikes can be made to be much more efficient (full rigid 29er comes to mind), it is just stupid to try to equate a full suspension MTB to a road bike. No way. Yes. Narrower, higher pressure tires make a huge difference (compared to knobbies). Yes - a "tuck" position is quite doable on a mountain bike (hands near the stem, elbows in - very much like roadies do on big straight descents). But above 17-18 MPH the more upright riding position (tuck notwithstanding), and more bike to catch the wind make the mountain bike less efficient overall.

To me there is a larger question at hand - what do YOU prefer? What is YOUR riding style? HOW are you going to use the bike?

If you are going to be commuting and prefer drop bars, then perhaps a cx bike with slicks or a "sport road" bike, with a rack and fenders would fit the bill. If you are riding for general fitness with an interest in riding for 1-2 or more hours, a road bike is hard to beat. If you like the position of your hands on flat bars, why not a speedy urban hybrid?

There really is no one answer because so much depends on YOU.
I'd say ignore your friend. To some degree he has a point - the same rider on a properly set up full rigid 29er with narrow tires, a road cassette, and the capacity to "tuck" will very likely ride the bike within 1 MPH of a proper road bike, but it is a bastardized setup that is trying to make something work for a job it was not intended to do.
If anything, a good, svelte hybrid (flat bar road bike) would be far better (IMO) if drop bars aren't your thing.
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Old 07-12-12, 09:52 AM
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Volagi bikes claim to have some sort of cushioning with their design and I might give that a try if I ever have that kind of money to drop on a bike. But yeah, in general, mtb suspension (especially the kind on magna bikes and the like that your friend bought at walmart) is not going to be helpful on a long distance road ride.
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Old 07-12-12, 09:53 AM
  #75  
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Originally Posted by Dudelsack View Post
Zombie Apocalypse dumb.
lets not get carried away here man........
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