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Want to put drop bars on a Hybrid - Help please

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Want to put drop bars on a Hybrid - Help please

Old 07-29-12, 03:08 PM
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surveywaters
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Want to put drop bars on a Hybrid - Help please

My wife rides a Specializaed Sirrus Elite. She's been riding all road and wants to be able to tuck while riding so she can try to keep up. I don't know much about the modern stuff and am wondering if there's an affordable way to install drop bars. Brifters are outrageiously priced and I can't find a decent stem shifter for a new larger headset. Any suggested setups that won't break the bank? I hope not to replace the brakes, but understand I probably will. I saw these but they're for a 9spd (the bike has an 8spd cassette) will they work?


Specs:
front derailleur - Shimano Deore, bottom-pull 2 chainwheels
rear derailleur - Shimano Tiagra 8spd
brakes - linear-pull brakes
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Old 07-29-12, 03:14 PM
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You could probably find some 8 spd bar-end shifters on eBay, that would be cheaper than brifters. Or go with downtube shifters.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/SHIMANO-ULTE...a#ht_579wt_905
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Old 07-29-12, 03:30 PM
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1+ bar ends are a very practical way to resolve this issue. velo orange should have them.

The thing i want to stress is "Don't spend too much", id even suggest she gets an entry level road bike....most custom made endeavors end up costing a lot more than planed.
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Old 07-29-12, 03:31 PM
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Microshift makes some 8 speed brifters that work nicely. I had a set on my first bike (a BD Dawes lightning DLX) I put 5000 miles on them last year with no problems. They are shimano compatable.
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Old 07-29-12, 03:46 PM
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+1 for Velo-Orange. This should do fine:
http://store.velo-orange.com/index.p...-shifters.html

+1 on "don't spend a lot" too. With those shifters, some inexpensive brake levers, inexpensive bars and bar tape, you could be out the door for probably not much more than the Nashbar brifters alone.
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Old 07-29-12, 03:53 PM
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Another alternative could be just plain positioning. Some pros are able to tuck on their tops, which should be similar on flat bars, if only with a bit wider hand positioning:

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Old 07-29-12, 04:08 PM
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@OP,
Seriously, do not do this.

If your wife wants a drop-bar road bike, sell/trade the Sirrus and get a drop-bar road bike. If her Sirrus is 2009 or later, the geometry (mainly t/t length) will be wrong for a dedicated drop-bar set-up. No matter what you spend, it will never be "right".

I'm content with bar-ends (my 'road bike' is a higher-level Sirrus); you might try those first (cheap to try), or drop-bar ends (bar ends that mimic the shape of a drop bar and allow the tuck position you refer to, albeit without brake/shift access), but that's about it. If that doesn't work, change bikes. Them's my two bits worth.
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Old 07-29-12, 04:32 PM
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man, I looked into this extensively when i had a hybrid. really, save yourself the trouble and just get a road bike.
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Old 07-29-12, 04:41 PM
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I'd try adapting flat bars first. You can get quite a decent position by using flat bars, a longer/lower stem, and bar ends (meaning the extensions at the end of the bar, not bar end shifters).

A quick illustration of my mtb (used primarily for road riding):


Ignore the mtb bit, the lights, etc. The important part is the lower, longer stem, the straight/flat bars, and the bar end extensions. My mountain bike is quite capable on the road. I even rode with an old friend who was getting back into racing who asked that I "handicap" myself by riding the mountain bike.

I think there are a few important things:
1. Flat bars, not one with any rise.
2. A long flat stem. My mtb has a 15 cm stem (my road bikes have 12 cm stems).
3. Move the controls inward as much as possible (brake levers and shifters), cut down the grip until it fits the rider's hand, slip on the bar end extensions, then mark the outside of the bar there. Cut the bars at that mark. If you have to revert the bike the only things you lose are the bars and the cut down grips.
4. The bar end extensions should be close to horizontal but pointing slightly up. I hold them loosely with my hands towards the end of them, my wrist is about where the bar is. My hand looks like I'm holding a fishing pole waiting for fish to bite. Or holding marshmallows on a stick over a fire. My forearms are about parallel to the ground, my elbow is bent about 90 deg, maybe a bit less (more open).

I fit numerous people like this in lieu of using drop bars. The bar ends give multiple hand positions, especially good for climbing out of the saddle and for flat stretches of road, and the regular grips give good control on descents and any tricky stuff (sidewalks, trails, etc). The people I fit were typically older and/or more conservative people who thought a road bike was just too sporty for them. They wanted the low gears, wide tires, and the straight bar confidence that a hybrid could give them. Plus back then hybrids were half/third the price of the cheapest road bike. Most of the riders were women, 35-40 years old or older.

Once the rider gets used to this position they may need a narrower saddle. Hybrid saddles are really designed for upright riders. Once weight gets better distributed and the legs move up and down more the rider may notice increase chafing. A narrower "road" saddle should help immensely.

Hope this helps,
cdr
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Old 07-29-12, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
I'd try adapting flat bars first. You can get quite a decent position by using flat bars, a longer/lower stem, and bar ends (meaning the extensions at the end of the bar, not bar end shifters).

A quick illustration of my mtb (used primarily for road riding):


Ignore the mtb bit, the lights, etc. The important part is the lower, longer stem, the straight/flat bars, and the bar end extensions. My mountain bike is quite capable on the road. I even rode with an old friend who was getting back into racing who asked that I "handicap" myself by riding the mountain bike.

I think there are a few important things:
1. Flat bars, not one with any rise.
2. A long flat stem. My mtb has a 15 cm stem (my road bikes have 12 cm stems).
3. Move the controls inward as much as possible (brake levers and shifters), cut down the grip until it fits the rider's hand, slip on the bar end extensions, then mark the outside of the bar there. Cut the bars at that mark. If you have to revert the bike the only things you lose are the bars and the cut down grips.
4. The bar end extensions should be close to horizontal but pointing slightly up. I hold them loosely with my hands towards the end of them, my wrist is about where the bar is. My hand looks like I'm holding a fishing pole waiting for fish to bite. Or holding marshmallows on a stick over a fire. My forearms are about parallel to the ground, my elbow is bent about 90 deg, maybe a bit less (more open).

I fit numerous people like this in lieu of using drop bars. The bar ends give multiple hand positions, especially good for climbing out of the saddle and for flat stretches of road, and the regular grips give good control on descents and any tricky stuff (sidewalks, trails, etc). The people I fit were typically older and/or more conservative people who thought a road bike was just too sporty for them. They wanted the low gears, wide tires, and the straight bar confidence that a hybrid could give them. Plus back then hybrids were half/third the price of the cheapest road bike. Most of the riders were women, 35-40 years old or older.

Once the rider gets used to this position they may need a narrower saddle. Hybrid saddles are really designed for upright riders. Once weight gets better distributed and the legs move up and down more the rider may notice increase chafing. A narrower "road" saddle should help immensely.

Hope this helps,
cdr
Thanks for posting this - I am going to copy you on a mountain bike that I use on the road, when riding with my wife.
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Old 07-29-12, 05:01 PM
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@OP,
cdr makes very good points! I should temper my initial response to: "don't attempt a conversion; try bar-ends/positioning first and if that's not enough, sell on/get a drop-bar road bike" -- wait, maybe that's what I said!?!
Anyway,
cdr's very coherent exposition could describe me in some respects: fwiw, I ride a (heavily upgraded) Sirrus Comp, but tweaked to be biased entirely toward road. It suits me, my physical limitations, age, etc. (61; male; severe degnerative arthritis in back and elsewhere); it allows me to ride comfortably my 6 to 7000 kms/year (entirely on-road). Picture below (crappy, I know) to show what a 'cdr' set-up might look like.

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Old 07-29-12, 05:16 PM
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As with others, I don't think putting drops on it will help much.

It looks to me like the Sirrus Elite is designed for a very upright position; e.g. the head tube is several cm taller than on a Dolce Triple. Also on the Sirrus, the chainstay is longer, wheelbase is much longer, crank length is longer, tires are 28c's....

I.e. you can't just switch to drop bars and voila you'll magically ride faster. There's a lot more to it than that.

Maybe if you lower the stem and flip it down, put on bar ends, and change to 25c's she might get a tad faster. But really, IF she is fit enough to keep up with road cyclists, and can't do it on the hybrid, then the best solution might be to get a racing-style road bike, get an aggressive fit, and hope for the best.
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Old 07-29-12, 08:41 PM
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Sell the Sirrus, buy a road bike. Drop bar conversions (in the hybrid forum) are not cheap. A real road bike will be better than a hybrid with drop bars. Felt Z85 is a very nice road bike. Perhaps you can find a LBS that accepts trade ins?
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Old 07-29-12, 10:05 PM
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I converted my Bianchi Valle flat-bar hybrid/city bike to drops with brifters, drop bars, new cables, and -- after some trial and error -- a much shorter stem. It felt pretty long if I tried to use the original stem length. It's like a light touring bike now.
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Old 07-30-12, 01:03 AM
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If the main goal is to just for her to be faster on her existing bike, aerobars might be the best option since they're cheap, and faster than drops.
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Old 07-30-12, 05:44 AM
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Thanks for all of the responses. The bike is a 2005 which has a very different frame geometry than the newer models which are more comfort bikes. I am very much considering a trade-in on a new bike but that's a very expensive route. A1penguin - I can't find a Felt Z85 for sale, I do like the felts though.
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Old 07-30-12, 06:32 AM
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It hurts one time, and is fun. Shes gonna be very happy with you too!

Put a 800 budget. In 6 months shes gonna let you buy a NICE cf bike!
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Old 07-30-12, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by echotraveler View Post
It hurts one time, and is fun. Shes gonna be very happy with you too!

Put a 800 budget. In 6 months shes gonna let you buy a NICE cf bike!
This is not a bad move. My wife was perfectly happy putting around the local MUT with her hybrid, until she went to a LBS one day and almost on a whim, put a deposit down on a Trek Lexa WSD. Once she got her saddle issues sorted out, she's now up to 40 mile rides.

Now her goal is to reward herself with a CF bike when she gets to the 6000 mile mark, which will pretty much give me leeway to do the same.
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Old 07-30-12, 07:09 AM
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Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
@OP,
Seriously, do not do this.

If your wife wants a drop-bar road bike, sell/trade the Sirrus and get a drop-bar road bike. If her Sirrus is 2009 or later, the geometry (mainly t/t length) will be wrong for a dedicated drop-bar set-up. No matter what you spend, it will never be "right".

I'm content with bar-ends (my 'road bike' is a higher-level Sirrus); you might try those first (cheap to try), or drop-bar ends (bar ends that mimic the shape of a drop bar and allow the tuck position you refer to, albeit without brake/shift access), but that's about it. If that doesn't work, change bikes. Them's my two bits worth.
+1. You'd be way better off getting the right tool for the job, than trying to make the wrong one work by throwing money at it.

If you do do it, the Bar end route would be your cheapest option. However, you're looking at new bars, tape, cables, bar ends, brake levers, and likely a new stem. Even on the cheap, you're likely well over $200, on a seven year old $500 bike.

Also you've got an issue with brakes. Road brake levers do not pull as much cable as MTB style brake levers. So the V brakes on that bike may not work well with road bike levers. There's a solution for this called Travel Agents, but you're adding more money and complexity.
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Old 07-30-12, 07:40 AM
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been there, done that, get her a road bike
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Old 07-30-12, 07:50 AM
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Butterfly trekking bars, while a bit hard to find, are cheap and will take your hybrid's brakes and shifters. Easy 15 minute job--you just move them over. By tweaking how you angle the bar, you can get quite a bit of drop if desired. The set I just put on my Trek 7.2FX was around $20.

There are other options too, just not sure myself which come with hybrid style bar diameters. Moustache bars for example. The ideas above to cut down the width and install bar ends on existing flat bar are other examples of inexpenive bar options.

I'm going to ask one more thing: are you sure it's the lack of a drop/aero position that's not allowing your wife to keep up? Are you running that fast in average speeds, with lots of downhills? I went with other bar options on my Trek hybrid mostly for comfort (the extra hand positions).
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Old 07-30-12, 07:54 AM
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Cane Creek speed bars would be another cheap option.




Although they're clamped on drop bars in the pic, you can clamp them on flat bars as well, and have a very aero position.

No access to the brake levers though.
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Old 07-30-12, 08:24 AM
  #23  
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^^^ I knew there was something like those available. I've been googling for the last two days to find them. Thanks for posting those.

OP, those might be a good, temporary choice to test if a drop position is going to work well on that bike. Scoot the grips and such in a little, clamp 'em on the ends of the bars, and viola.
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Old 07-30-12, 04:18 PM
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Thanks again guys! The more I look the more reasons I see to just buy her a dedicated road bike. I stopped in at the LBS today and looked at a Trek Lexa C, they offered it to me for $600 which seems to be a good deal. I'm thinking that this would be the price range, of course I'd rather spend less. Have have been looking at a certain online store which claims to sale direct and I see some pretty nice set ups for really nice prices. For instance the Motobecane Record is a sharp looking bike with some really nice components coming in at $450.
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