Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

The Gear Hall of Fame

Old 07-30-12, 12:39 PM
  #1  
ravenmore
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ravenmore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 8,276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The Gear Hall of Fame

Ok, so I know it's from Bicycling Magazine but I thought it was interesting to flip through the 15 'entries'. Anything else you would add to the list?

http://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/...gear-hall-fame
ravenmore is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 12:57 PM
  #2  
GiantDefyGuy
At least I'm not a poseur
 
GiantDefyGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New Orleans, USA.
Posts: 794

Bikes: Giant Defy 3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That was interesting.

But I think they should've made it a top 14 list and left off the camelback. WTF.
GiantDefyGuy is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 01:15 PM
  #3  
banerjek
Portland Fred
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,472

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
banerjek is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 01:45 PM
  #4  
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 30,331

Bikes: Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Calfee Dragonfly Tandem

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 870 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by GiantDefyGuy View Post
That was interesting.

But I think they should've made it a top 14 list and left off the camelback. WTF.
They included MTB stuff as well. Camelback definitely belongs in the list when MTB is considered.
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 01:48 PM
  #5  
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 30,331

Bikes: Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Calfee Dragonfly Tandem

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 870 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Other products left off: 1) a power meter, either an SRM the first reliable widely available PM, or a Powertap, first PM used by the masses.

2) first good cyclecomputer, probably an Avocet,

3) first good clincher racing tire, probably the Michelin tire that was first raced in the TDF in the 1980's

4) deep sectioned carbon fiber wheels, the original Zipp 404 would be an obvious choice.

5) Heart Rate monitor, probably an early Polar.

6) Shimano Dura Ace 7400, first indexed shifting group.


And if their list was in order, STI should have been No. 1.
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:13 PM
  #6  
ravenmore
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ravenmore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 8,276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think one huge one they left off that's fairly obvious is carbon fiber as a material. I remember as a kid seeing this 'new material' in the news. Now its used not only in bikes but also in bike components, shoes, helmets and so on. It's probably changed more aspects of cycling than any other single material.
ravenmore is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:18 PM
  #7  
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 30,331

Bikes: Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Calfee Dragonfly Tandem

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 870 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
^ the Kestrel frame was probably the best pick you could make of a product made of CF. I probably would have written it a little different; made the point that you make about the huge influence of CF, but still picked the Kestrel as the product that best represents that.
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:22 PM
  #8  
Commodus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 4,144
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
Other products left off: 1) a power meter, either an SRM the first reliable widely available PM, or a Powertap, first PM used by the masses.

2) first good cyclecomputer, probably an Avocet,

3) first good clincher racing tire, probably the Michelin tire that was first raced in the TDF in the 1980's

4) deep sectioned carbon fiber wheels, the original Zipp 404 would be an obvious choice.

5) Heart Rate monitor, probably an early Polar.

6) Shimano Dura Ace 7400, first indexed shifting group.


And if their list was in order, STI should have been No. 1.
7400 was the first indexed group? I didn't know that...I bought a set on eBay for my townie.

The things you learn!
Commodus is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:22 PM
  #9  
GiantDefyGuy
At least I'm not a poseur
 
GiantDefyGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New Orleans, USA.
Posts: 794

Bikes: Giant Defy 3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
They included MTB stuff as well. Camelback definitely belongs in the list when MTB is considered.
Yeah, I'm fine with the other MTB stuff being included, but not the camelback.
Rock Shox belong in that list, and so does the stunt-jumper, but a backpack does not. (IMO)
GiantDefyGuy is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:26 PM
  #10  
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 30,331

Bikes: Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Calfee Dragonfly Tandem

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 870 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Commodus View Post
7400 was the first indexed group? I didn't know that...I bought a set on eBay for my townie.

The things you learn!
At least that worked well and was mass produced.

http://www.disraeligears.co.uk/Site/..._brochure.html
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:28 PM
  #11  
ravenmore
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ravenmore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 8,276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
^ the Kestrel frame was probably the best pick you could make of a product made of CF. I probably would have written it a little different; made the point that you make about the huge influence of CF, but still picked the Kestrel as the product that best represents that.
I think carbon fiber deserves its own spot. Engineering a new material that hadn't existed before to me trumps making one product from it. The Kestrel certainly deserves a spot though for representing a step forward in bike manufacturing methods and aero tubes.
ravenmore is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:48 PM
  #12  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,283

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2415 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 79 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by GiantDefyGuy View Post
Yeah, I'm fine with the other MTB stuff being included, but not the camelback.
Rock Shox belong in that list, and so does the stunt-jumper, but a backpack does not. (IMO)
Try and find a mountain biker that doesn't have at least one Camelbak. Heck, try and find a mountain biker that doesn't have 2 of them. Fumbling for water bottles while riding off-road just doesn't work. And there is nothing worse than finding yourself deep in the woods with an empty water bottle cage because the stupid thing fell out.

And Camelbaks were invented by a roadie for roadies in the next state to the west of you.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 02:52 PM
  #13  
Sixty Fiver
Bicycle Repair Man !!!
 
Sixty Fiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: YEG
Posts: 27,266

Bikes: See my sig...

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by GiantDefyGuy View Post
Yeah, I'm fine with the other MTB stuff being included, but not the camelback.
Rock Shox belong in that list, and so does the stunt-jumper, but a backpack does not. (IMO)
Hydro packs are awesome.
Sixty Fiver is offline  
Old 07-30-12, 03:38 PM
  #14  
garciawork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Meridian, ID
Posts: 1,338

Bikes: Mikkelsen, Niner SS, Lynskey Disc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't ride without my camelback. Period. I have the one designed so you can still get into your pockets easily, and I never have to stop for water so no reason to plan for it. Never understood the hate, especially considering they were literally invented with road races in mind.
garciawork is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 03:17 AM
  #15  
ravenmore
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ravenmore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 8,276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've started riding CX. I've gone over super bumpy stuff and not lost a bottle yet, but I do get tired of the grit on the bottles around the spout. Need to bust out the camel back and see what kind of shape its in.
ravenmore is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 07:31 AM
  #16  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,283

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2415 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 79 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by ravenmore View Post
I've started riding CX. I've gone over super bumpy stuff and not lost a bottle yet, but I do get tired of the grit on the bottles around the spout. Need to bust out the camel back and see what kind of shape its in.
Since I haven't used a bottle on a mountain bike in ages, I forgot about that aspect. Ride through a cow pasture sometime...around here the forests are cow pastures...and you'll soon realize why Camelbaks are so handy
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 07:59 AM
  #17  
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,037

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 792 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 20 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
Other products left off: 1) a power meter, either an SRM the first reliable widely available PM, or a Powertap, first PM used by the masses.

2) first good cyclecomputer, probably an Avocet,

3) first good clincher racing tire, probably the Michelin tire that was first raced in the TDF in the 1980's

4) deep sectioned carbon fiber wheels, the original Zipp 404 would be an obvious choice.

5) Heart Rate monitor, probably an early Polar.

6) Shimano Dura Ace 7400, first indexed shifting group.


And if their list was in order, STI should have been No. 1.
Any of those could have replaced the Garmin. That looked more like a product "placement".
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: http://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 09:41 AM
  #18  
garciawork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Meridian, ID
Posts: 1,338

Bikes: Mikkelsen, Niner SS, Lynskey Disc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
Any of those could have replaced the Garmin. That looked more like a product "placement".
Agree. They should have used whichever Garmin was the first to do its job reliably, not the most expensive one currently available. My boss LOVED whatever the last generation high end Garmin was, and it always performed flawlessly.
garciawork is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 09:49 AM
  #19  
okhealthy
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
yes, we used whichever Garmin was the first to do its job reliably. good info to me, thank you.
okhealthy is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 12:05 PM
  #20  
nhluhr
John Wayne Toilet Paper
 
nhluhr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Roanoke
Posts: 1,951

Bikes: BH carbon, Ritchey steel, Kona aluminum

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
2) first good cyclecomputer, probably an Avocet
Do you remember how good (and immediate) the resolution on those Avocet computers was? At least on my old Avocet 40, they had that hub-mounted magnet with 20 pulses per revolution. You barely had to turn the wheel to get a reading!

Nowadays I just let the GPS calculate the reading and it's 'close enough'.
nhluhr is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 12:13 PM
  #21  
save10
Arrogant Roadie Punk
 
save10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: California
Posts: 2,353
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
there was a time when that stumpjumper was state of the art.

not a MTN bike guy myself but if you haven seen Klunkerz (essentially about the origins of MTN biking in Marin county with Tom Ritchey, Joe Breeze, Gary Fisher, etc) its a pretty good movie. http://www.klunkerz.com/
save10 is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 12:16 PM
  #22  
banerjek
Portland Fred
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,472

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
Do you remember how good (and immediate) the resolution on those Avocet computers was? At least on my old Avocet 40, they had that hub-mounted magnet with 20 pulses per revolution. You barely had to turn the wheel to get a reading!
I have a Cateye that I think was originally bought in '83 that had basic functions including cadence. Not sure if this was a nod to truthfulness in speed, but it also didn't have autostop -- you hit the start/stop buttons.

I'd still be using the thing except I tore one of the wires out of the harness several years ago and the new equivalent (Astrale 8) is so stupid cheap.

For most part, I'm not a fan of the wireless computers. They're heavier, slower to respond, and batteries don't last nearly as long -- I typically get several years out of a battery. The Garmin 500 intrigues me a little, but I don't need to upload data to know how slow I am and I certainly don't want to charge the thing every time I ride.
banerjek is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 03:00 PM
  #23  
soma5
Hanging On
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
The Garmin 500 intrigues me a little, but I don't need to upload data to know how slow I am and I certainly don't want to charge the thing every time I ride.
The Garmin 500 is supposed to run for about 18 hours on a full charge. That's more than one ride for most folks. It also charges while you have it hooked up to your computer to upload your data, so it's not really that onerous to keep it charged. You don't need to send your data to some ride-sharing website. You can use the app that Garmin provides that just keeps your data on your own computer. It beats entering info by hand. What I like best is that I get a map of where I've been, so I can go on some of the same roads again if they were nice.
soma5 is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 03:11 PM
  #24  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,283

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2415 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 79 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
Do you remember how good (and immediate) the resolution on those Avocet computers was? At least on my old Avocet 40, they had that hub-mounted magnet with 20 pulses per revolution. You barely had to turn the wheel to get a reading!

Nowadays I just let the GPS calculate the reading and it's 'close enough'.
All I remember is that the Avocet was a royal pain to set up and that it didn't work worth a damn on mountain bikes because it stopped registering at around 4 mph...which is a speed that mountain bikers ride at all too often.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 07-31-12, 03:41 PM
  #25  
Jed19
Senior Member
 
Jed19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,225
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Since I haven't used a bottle on a mountain bike in ages, I forgot about that aspect. Ride through a cow pasture sometime...around here the forests are cow pastures...and you'll soon realize why Camelbaks are so handy
Camelbaks certainly belong there. I have three of them, use them for city hikes, back-country hikes and mountain biking. They are just a wonderful invention.
Jed19 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.