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Seems like almost everyone in my city uses a mountain bike for urban use. Why?

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Seems like almost everyone in my city uses a mountain bike for urban use. Why?

Old 08-10-12, 04:21 AM
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HBxRider
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Seems like almost everyone in my city uses a mountain bike for urban use. Why?

I live in orange county, CA. The middle of suburbia. Almost all the roads in my city has a bike lane. The pavement is well maintained and the roads are wide. My city is recognized as a bike friendly community by the LBA.

Yet 90 percent of the people I see riding in the street (commuters and casual riders), and people on the beach trail, are riding mountain bikes (if not beach cruisers).

There's no mountains around here, and I don't even know of any offroad trails in the city. Zero unpaved roads.

I think they are choosing to ride mountain bikes because it's a macho thing. Or they think they will look uncool riding a road bike.

I use my road bike for running errands around town, as well as the long distance fitness rides. More people need to know that road bikes are good all purpose bikes, at least for the suburbs. Who doesn't want to get to their destination faster?
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Old 08-10-12, 05:03 AM
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bigger tires look more like car tires vs road bike 23's. Ive had people
come up to say "those thin wheels ARE dangerous!"

Also the big box stores sell 90% mtb and 9% beachcruisers! LOL
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Old 08-10-12, 05:26 AM
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I don't know about anybody else, but I enjoy riding my hard-tail MTB on short urban paved runs. Sometimes, I just like the more casual and more multi-purpose feel for that kind of riding. Not always about speed. Sometimes, the road bike just seems too formal for me. Nice sometimes just to throw on my cargo shorts, a t-shirt, and clip in w/ my walkable SPD shoes. At the beach, I too usually tool around for 15-20 miles or so rides on my MTB or my hybrid. I have semi-slicks on them and they roll just fine. Myself, I like variety. But, if you are saying that they are riding on knobbies on pavement, that would be too slow for me, but to each his own. With all that said, 70% of my fitness riding all year now days is on the road bike - no purpose but to burn calories, maintain weight, taste some speed, tackle some tough climbs, feel like a pro (in my mind), enjoying the feel of my road bike, while still taking in nature. I still like to use my MTB or hybrid on the MUPs (paved or gravel) in my area. Plenty fun. Nice "change of pace."
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Old 08-10-12, 05:30 AM
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My dad lent me his mountain bike (an entry level trek). and damn did it feel heavy and slow in comparison, like a tank. I had fun going offroad, but thorns in the dirt gave me a flat in the first 10 miles. I was pretty disappointed that going offroad in a mountain bike got me stranded so easily. On the plus side, going fast downhill with those wide tires felt very safe and confident.
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Old 08-10-12, 05:34 AM
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i mostly drag my kid's trailer on my mtb. it's nice to have the extra gearing when you are hauling an extra 50 lbs or more. you don't have to air up as often, and it's an easy bike to grab. i keep the frame nice and dirty so that it isn't particularly attractive to thieves. i have used the fine trails here plenty in the past and will hopefully again this fall.
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Old 08-10-12, 05:55 AM
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Anyone in the area drive SUVs?
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Old 08-10-12, 06:04 AM
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I don't own a road bike. I have two mtbs. One modified for fast riding and the other for cargo and kid hauling. I like the more upright position you get and the ability to go offroad if I want to. With 6 months of commuting and riding 30km every morning I wouldn't call an mtb slow. I can get her up a 28km/h average and hit 61km/h going down hill. I've done 150km in 5 1/2 hours (moving time 6 1/2 if you count breaks) and to be honest I just like the geometry. I guess its what you are used to. You wouldn't find me riding a cheap BSO "mtb" though. Those things are just... sad.
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Old 08-10-12, 06:22 AM
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Because they're uncivilized, that's why. There . . . . somebody had to say it.
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Old 08-10-12, 06:31 AM
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I hope you are seriously asking yourself an honest question here ... and not just looking for a way to diss mtb-hybrid riders.
If you are ... try to look at this subject with an open mind and try to not look at it from an elitist roadie perspective.

A couple of reasons why someone might want to ride a MTB-hybrid around town:

-wider tires are safer in traffic because they have more grip and stop faster.
-wider tires are more comfortable because they are used at lower pressure and so absorb more vibration.
-wider tires have less rolling resistance and so they are actually faster than narrow tires ... when ridden at moderate speed, which is what happens in suburb traffic.
-an upright position is safer in traffic because it lets you have more overview.
-MTB's-hybrids can ride almost anywhere, making it possible to take shortcuts through parks or fields where roadbikes will have difficulties.
-some people, including myself, simply do not like the feel of drop handlebars.
-some people, including myself, simply like the feel of flat handlebars. Others like riser bars ... to each his own, right?
-you speak of "speed", but the actual difference between any 2 bikes is very small. The rider and the position are what makes most of the difference. MTB's and hybrids can, if needed, be ridden in a more aggressive position than most people ride them. Most MTB-hybrid riders simply aren't after speed but more after comfort and safety.
-front suspension is pretty neat for bombing up sidewalks or over cobblestones
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Old 08-10-12, 06:35 AM
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Because they are cheap, readily available and multi-purpose. Road bikes are a one trick pony.
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Old 08-10-12, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by slowandsteady View Post
because they are cheap, readily available and multi-purpose.
fify.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by HBxRider View Post
I live in orange county, CA.

There's no mountains around here, and I don't even know of any offroad trails in the city. Zero unpaved roads.
just a heads up, there are lots of pretty decent mountain bike trails in orange county. people in the midwest would kill for the mtb access that you have.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
I hope you are seriously asking yourself an honest question here ... and not just looking for a way to diss mtb-hybrid riders.
If you are ... try to look at this subject with an open mind and try to not look at it from an elitist roadie perspective.

A couple of reasons why someone might want to ride a MTB-hybrid around town:

-wider tires are safer in traffic because they have more grip and stop faster.
-wider tires are more comfortable because they are used at lower pressure and so absorb more vibration.
-wider tires have less rolling resistance and so they are actually faster than narrow tires ... when ridden at moderate speed, which is what happens in suburb traffic.
-an upright position is safer in traffic because it lets you have more overview.
-MTB's-hybrids can ride almost anywhere, making it possible to take shortcuts through parks or fields where roadbikes will have difficulties.
-some people, including myself, simply do not like the feel of drop handlebars.
-some people, including myself, simply like the feel of flat handlebars. Others like riser bars ... to each his own, right?
-you speak of "speed", but the actual difference between any 2 bikes is very small. The rider and the position are what makes most of the difference. MTB's and hybrids can, if needed, be ridden in a more aggressive position than most people ride them. Most MTB-hybrid riders simply aren't after speed but more after comfort and safety.
-front suspension is pretty neat for bombing up sidewalks or over cobblestones
Well, that was predictable.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by topflightpro View Post
fify.
I wouldn't recommend doing this with a road bike. Road bikes are good for smooth roads and not much else.

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Old 08-10-12, 07:23 AM
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I'm guessing they also like to take their bike out of town and ride trails. Mountain bikes are pretty good and jumping curbs and other stuff that would trash a road bike wheel. And if you're looking for cheap all-around transportation, its probably going to be a mountain bike or hybrid.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by HBxRider View Post
I live in orange county, CA. The middle of suburbia. Almost all the roads in my city has a bike lane. The pavement is well maintained and the roads are wide. My city is recognized as a bike friendly community by the LBA.

Yet 90 percent of the people I see riding in the street (commuters and casual riders), and people on the beach trail, are riding mountain bikes (if not beach cruisers).

There's no mountains around here, and I don't even know of any offroad trails in the city. Zero unpaved roads.

I think they are choosing to ride mountain bikes because it's a macho thing. Or they think they will look uncool riding a road bike.

I use my road bike for running errands around town, as well as the long distance fitness rides. More people need to know that road bikes are good all purpose bikes, at least for the suburbs. Who doesn't want to get to their destination faster?
It's easy to generalize. H.B. is just part of O.C. You are most likely describing the riders who wear no helmet and maybe flip flops as shoes. They come out to ride on the 4th of July to mill around the H.B. pier and Main Street because they know their cars get caught in beach traffic jams.

But I was eyeing this new hardtail brand and the SUV that I use is ideal to put the bike into and travel around Southern Calif to ride. Yes, SUV's are a good choice in So Calif for bike transport.

https://www.opencycle.com/
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Old 08-10-12, 07:37 AM
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I live across the country from you and while cycling in general does not have the same mass appeal in my area as other places, I dont know a single person with a road bike. All of my family and friends who have bikes, have MTBs or hybrids. They did not even consider road bikes before purchasing though they never take them on actual trails.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:39 AM
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In fact, I took some ball busting when I first bought my road bike from nearly all of my friends and family, especially for the lycra.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:49 AM
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They are pretty versatile as mentioned. I ride mine in town and with the kid when there is a pretty good chance something would happen to my road bike that would make me sad. Its my beater. Camping, riding the Mission Bay Mup with the kid and times where Im riding with noobs or people who don't have road bikes. Sometimes it even makes it to the dirt
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Old 08-10-12, 08:15 AM
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I prefer my road bike for commuting, because I love the speed, thrill and road feel, sometimes my road bike is out of commission and I ride my FSR XC in locked mode(front and back) with my 2" wide knobbies and it's so friggin smooth. Granted I lose about 7-8km/hr. I also wish I had drop bars on my mtb(when I'm riding flat roads), so many more hand positions and easier to tuck

Nonetheless, once the open road is over and I get to town, I usually purposely detour through some trails/walkways with stairs, curbs and hills just so I can screw around, and it's fun as hell!
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Old 08-10-12, 08:23 AM
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I bought a hardtail 29er with a lockout fork specifically for commuting. I put 700x38 tires and a rack with trunk bag on the bike. It's rugged and heavy and I ride it like I'm going to a fire. I could ride my road bike to work but it's only 4 miles each way and I consider the commute part of my daily workout. It only takes a few minutes to put my big knobby tires on to go ride some single track. So the heavy mountain bike serves several purposes.
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Old 08-10-12, 08:44 AM
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Personally i think a mountain bike is probably the best bike for the average person. They are so versatile and rugged.
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Old 08-10-12, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
Well, that was predictable.
Well, that was a useless post.
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Old 08-10-12, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
Well, that was a useless post.
Well, that was a useless post.
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Old 08-10-12, 09:11 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by AdelaaR View Post
I hope you are seriously asking yourself an honest question here ... and not just looking for a way to diss mtb-hybrid riders.
If you are ... try to look at this subject with an open mind and try to not look at it from an elitist roadie perspective.

A couple of reasons why someone might want to ride a MTB-hybrid around town:

-wider tires are safer in traffic because they have more grip and stop faster.
-wider tires are more comfortable because they are used at lower pressure and so absorb more vibration.
-wider tires have less rolling resistance and so they are actually faster than narrow tires ... when ridden at moderate speed, which is what happens in suburb traffic.
-an upright position is safer in traffic because it lets you have more overview.
-MTB's-hybrids can ride almost anywhere, making it possible to take shortcuts through parks or fields where roadbikes will have difficulties.
-some people, including myself, simply do not like the feel of drop handlebars.
-some people, including myself, simply like the feel of flat handlebars. Others like riser bars ... to each his own, right?
-you speak of "speed", but the actual difference between any 2 bikes is very small. The rider and the position are what makes most of the difference. MTB's and hybrids can, if needed, be ridden in a more aggressive position than most people ride them. Most MTB-hybrid riders simply aren't after speed but more after comfort and safety.
-front suspension is pretty neat for bombing up sidewalks or over cobblestones
Forgot
- you can pass road riders in full kit on Zipp wheels
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