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How many original components do you have?

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How many original components do you have?

Old 08-21-12, 09:02 AM
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How many original components do you have?

Obviously many people have upgraded their bikes a TON. I was wondering how many components on your bike came with the original bike?

I'm guilty of the upgrades as well , and the only original pieces attached my frame are the headset, brakes, and crankset. The brakes will probably be done soon because they're just not as powerful as a good set from a decent component group. (I've had Shimano 105 brakes that were much better).
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Old 08-21-12, 09:03 AM
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Since I built my bikes up from frames I guess none.
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Old 08-21-12, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by LowCel
Since I built my bikes up from frames I guess none.
+1. That is why no one should buy a bike to ride set up by the factory or some one else, unless it is set up exactly the way you want it (rare).
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Old 08-21-12, 09:12 AM
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Not a single one, other than a seat and some bar wrap. Everything else was sourced used.
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Old 08-21-12, 09:13 AM
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my current bike is stone stock, for now. I may upgrade the brakes from tektro to apex just to match the rest of my components, but, not because of anything performance related. probably much cheaper to get better pads and call it a day, but, oh well, purely aesthetic and a bit of an OCD thing.

edit - I'll probably upgrade the saddle over winter and try a few. only complaint i have on my bike and its a minor one.
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Old 08-21-12, 09:18 AM
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frame, headset, fork, seatpost clamp
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Old 08-21-12, 09:37 AM
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Brifters, seatpost, stem, cranks and RD. Seatpost and stem are probably next with Brifters to follow (I really want hidden cables from the shifters.
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Old 08-21-12, 10:41 AM
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Zero. I started with a used bike and replaced everything on it including the frame and fork until their is nothing left of the original bike. Wait there is one part, the seat post and I see no reason to replace a Thomson seatpost.
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Old 08-21-12, 10:42 AM
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Still riding my mostly stock entry level Giant Defy3, which is now 3 years old. Sora/2200 mixed groupset. I alternate it with another bike so it doesn't get a ton of miles, but probably about 50 per week.

I've changed the chain, brake pads, and bartape. Everything else still works great, to my surprise, as I thought the Sora components would either fail or become unadjustable after 2 years, but that clearly hasn't been the case, and it's a triple to boot. It's not as perfectly buttery as when I first got it, but it's more than my match for hammerfest rides.

At some inevitable point though, that Sora WILL wear out and when I'm not happy with its performance any more, I'll swap it up to ultegra or get a new bicycle outright.

I don't have the time to build and break down bikes right now. In the future yes, but right now, when I've got a full time day job, toddler running around, wife who also works full time, and I throw 16-18 hours per week of training on top, there's def no time for me to mess with bike builds (even though I really want to.)

Funds aren't an issue for me at all regarding bikes, but my approach to acquiring and replacing things is pretty much on the lines of 'if ain't broke, don't fix it', and if I'm getting great riding and training on my stock bike, I'm going to avoid upgraditis and not swap everything out just because I can.
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Old 08-21-12, 10:57 AM
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Obviously, had to get pedals.
Saddle was the first swap after < 100 miles.
Fork (the original one cracked) after ~ 2500 miles.
New wheels, tires, tubes shortly after.
Cassette + chain around 3000 miles but that's mostly due to mileage rather than wanting to upgrade.

I'm over 4000 miles now so I'm thinking of getting a cheaper CX bike to take most of my daily commuting miles and make those upgrades last longer.
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Old 08-21-12, 11:25 AM
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None. I bought a Cervelo R3 in 2006 then gradually replaced most of the parts with parts that worked better for me. Then Cervelo replaced the fork under warranty, and later replaced the frame under warranty and I took the opportunity to upgrade to an R3SL frame. Earlier this year I removed the original 7800 shifters, fd and brakes and put Sram red and EE brakes on it.

So its like Washington's axe that's had three new handles and two new heads. But it's also been 6 years and I ride a lot. Some people buy a new bike every year or two, I keep the same bike and improve it.
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Old 08-21-12, 11:28 AM
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Not counting consumables. Cranks and saddle, but plan on replacing groupo and wheels in a year
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Old 08-21-12, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by LowCel
Since I built my bikes up from frames I guess none.
Originally Posted by UCIMBZ
+1. That is why no one should buy a bike to ride set up by the factory or some one else, unless it is set up exactly the way you want it (rare).
All my bikes were bought as framesets as well. I guess one of them did come with a headset but that is it.

My wife does own a single speed commuter that came of of a box. It was very, very close to what she wanted and was far too cheap to pass up. We swapped the seat and will eventually swap the grips (flat bar road bike)

Edit: I guess my Yokota did originally sell as a complete bike but it came to me as a frameset. All the others were originally sold as framesets.
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Old 08-21-12, 11:36 AM
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From my first nice road bike I still have the brake calipers (Ultegra 6600) and saddle (Selle Italia Flite Ti). Neither has been improved upon in the last decade.
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Old 08-21-12, 11:50 AM
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The question as posed makes no sense.

There is no such thing as OEM on a bike. There is a frame, then someone else (or lots of someone elses) makes everything else. A bike you buy complete is a frame a frame builder sold you with a bunch of name brand parts stuck on it that the frame builder was able to get cheap because he buys in quantity. There are no "OEM vs. aftermarket" or anything like that like you find in the automobile world. This is not the automobile model for manufacturing. This is the "custom build" (for lack of a better word) model with every manufacturer specializing on one thing, the frame builder acting as arbitrator for buying components in quantity, and the bike shop acting as the assembler.

Another way to put it is the automobile model is fully integrated into a vertical supply structure with every part owned and manufactured by the auto maker (or if not strictly manufactured by the auto maker, then "OEM-ed", meaning someone else manufactures the part under contract and the auto maker puts its sticker on it). This is as opposed to the custom build model, which is fully distributed with different companies building different parts under their own name.

It works this way (I should add that this is for road bikes; dept store bikes are more the OEM model) because each and every bike is custom. There is no such thing as a "stock" bike. Every part is adjustable and replaceable and everyone makes their adjustments and replacements over time.
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Old 08-21-12, 12:00 PM
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Everything is still original...except bar tape

Don't have money to afford upgrading, and frankly don't really care about upgrading because I see no need. I dig the setup I have as is, why fix it if it ain't broke!
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Old 08-21-12, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
The question as posed makes no sense.

There is no such thing as OEM on a bike. There is a frame, then someone else (or lots of someone elses) makes everything else. A bike you buy complete is a frame a frame builder sold you with a bunch of name brand parts stuck on it that the frame builder was able to get cheap because he buys in quantity. There are no "OEM vs. aftermarket" or anything like that like you find in the automobile world. This is not the automobile model for manufacturing. This is the "custom build" (for lack of a better word) model with every manufacturer specializing on one thing, the frame builder acting as arbitrator for buying components in quantity, and the bike shop acting as the assembler.

Another way to put it is the automobile model is fully integrated into a vertical supply structure with every part owned and manufactured by the auto maker (or if not strictly manufactured by the auto maker, then "OEM-ed", meaning someone else manufactures the part under contract and the auto maker puts its sticker on it). This is as opposed to the custom build model, which is fully distributed with different companies building different parts under their own name.

It works this way (I should add that this is for road bikes; dept store bikes are more the OEM model) because each and every bike is custom. There is no such thing as a "stock" bike. Every part is adjustable and replaceable and everyone makes their adjustments and replacements over time.
hmmm...

that was the question to begin with. didn't seem that confusing to me. bikes come stock from the manufacturer with an assortment of parts. those parts are "original" to the bike. when you replace the parts, they become "non-original".
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Old 08-21-12, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
The question as posed makes no sense.

There is no such thing as OEM on a bike. There is a frame, then someone else (or lots of someone elses) makes everything else. A bike you buy complete is a frame a frame builder sold you with a bunch of name brand parts stuck on it that the frame builder was able to get cheap because he buys in quantity. There are no "OEM vs. aftermarket" or anything like that like you find in the automobile world. This is not the automobile model for manufacturing. This is the "custom build" (for lack of a better word) model with every manufacturer specializing on one thing, the frame builder acting as arbitrator for buying components in quantity, and the bike shop acting as the assembler.

Another way to put it is the automobile model is fully integrated into a vertical supply structure with every part owned and manufactured by the auto maker (or if not strictly manufactured by the auto maker, then "OEM-ed", meaning someone else manufactures the part under contract and the auto maker puts its sticker on it). This is as opposed to the custom build model, which is fully distributed with different companies building different parts under their own name.

It works this way (I should add that this is for road bikes; dept store bikes are more the OEM model) because each and every bike is custom. There is no such thing as a "stock" bike. Every part is adjustable and replaceable and everyone makes their adjustments and replacements over time.
Relax man, we all knew what he was talking about
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Old 08-21-12, 12:18 PM
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i have purchased two complete bikes - my first road bike years ago, and a track bike. road bike got replacement saddle, crankset/bb (from triple to double), and fd. track bike is bone stock aside from consumables. subsequently, i have purchased four more framesets that have shared a rotation of about 2.5 bikes worth of various components.
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Old 08-21-12, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
The question as posed makes no sense.

There is no such thing as OEM on a bike. There is a frame, then someone else (or lots of someone elses) makes everything else. A bike you buy complete is a frame a frame builder sold you with a bunch of name brand parts stuck on it that the frame builder was able to get cheap because he buys in quantity. There are no "OEM vs. aftermarket" or anything like that like you find in the automobile world. This is not the automobile model for manufacturing. This is the "custom build" (for lack of a better word) model with every manufacturer specializing on one thing, the frame builder acting as arbitrator for buying components in quantity, and the bike shop acting as the assembler.

Another way to put it is the automobile model is fully integrated into a vertical supply structure with every part owned and manufactured by the auto maker (or if not strictly manufactured by the auto maker, then "OEM-ed", meaning someone else manufactures the part under contract and the auto maker puts its sticker on it). This is as opposed to the custom build model, which is fully distributed with different companies building different parts under their own name.

It works this way (I should add that this is for road bikes; dept store bikes are more the OEM model) because each and every bike is custom. There is no such thing as a "stock" bike. Every part is adjustable and replaceable and everyone makes their adjustments and replacements over time.
I think he means is your bike spec'ed exactly as it was when it was purchased. I woud suspect that buying a Specialized Roubix whether it is in New York or Los Angeles would be the same bike if it has the same componet level it. So an Dura Ace model would be the same for a given year any place in the country. Some people want to make their bikes to their own liking and change stuff. I could pick my bike or my car out of a crowd as they are both completely unique.
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Old 08-21-12, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by fly:yes/land:no
hmmm...

that was the question to begin with. didn't seem that confusing to me. bikes come stock from the manufacturer with an assortment of parts. those parts are "original" to the bike. when you replace the parts, they become "non-original".
+1
He never claimed Frame manufacturer put their name on the parts like OEM parts
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Old 08-21-12, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by fly:yes/land:no
hmmm...

that was the question to begin with. didn't seem that confusing to me. bikes come stock from the manufacturer with an assortment of parts. those parts are "original" to the bike. when you replace the parts, they become "non-original".
The point is the answer is trivial. Everyone replaces parts on their bike. The bike is designed for that. This is the point I was making.

My car, on the other hand, is completely stock 7 years after I bought it, because that was how it was designed. A serious rider who changed nothing on their bike for seven years yet rode it every day is a fair rarity in the world of cycling. In the world of cars, stock cars that stay stock over their lifetime are the norm and customization is the rarity. When something wears out on a bike, you go to the bike shop and they give you an array of options of brands to replace said part. When something wears out in a car, you take it to the shop and you get an OEM part straight from the manufacturer, identical to the part that came stock with the car.

Most of these questions (and they pop up a lot on this forum) are asked for reasons along the lines of answering the question: "...is it okay to customize my bike?" The answer is a trivial "yes" because the bike is designed with change and customization in mind. Because this question pops up so much, I thought I might as well answer it with something other than a "me too" type answer, otherwise this forum would be a very boring place indeed.
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Old 08-21-12, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
The point is the answer is trivial. Everyone replaces parts on their bike. The bike is designed for that. This is the point I was making.

My car, on the other hand, is completely stock 7 years after I bought it, because that was how it was designed. A serious rider who changed nothing on their bike for seven years yet rode it every day is a fair rarity in the world of cycling. In the world of cars, stock cars that stay stock over their lifetime are the norm and customization is the rarity.

Most of these questions (and they pop up a lot on this forum) are asked for reasons along the lines of answering the question: "...is it okay to customize my bike?" The answer is a trivial "yes" because the bike is designed with change and customization in mind. Because this question pops up so much, I thought I might as well answer it with something other than a "me too" type answer, otherwise this forum would be a very boring place indeed.
Race cars get almost all the components replaced, as do people trying to race bicycles. Also i would say most of the stuff on the internet is trivial. Just if nothing else for the purpose of social interaction.
I'm not arguing, just saying.
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Old 08-21-12, 12:49 PM
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I've replaced my handlebars, bar tape, and saddle ... plus the chain and tires, many times. Well, I have better wheels now, too. Still, that's not bad for the 41.
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Old 08-21-12, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Elduderino2412
Race cars as many of our bicycles get almost all the components replaced. Also i would say most of the stuff on the internet is trivial. Just if nothing else for the purpose of social interaction.
I'm not arguing, just saying.
Nobody races cars. Not enough to care about with this discussion at least. When body shops advertise that they use "real OEM" parts as a selling point, you know the aftermarket for car parts is very small and not of the best reputation. It's the other way around in the bike world.

And stuff on the internet is trivial only if you want it that way.
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