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If you were buying a set of skewers, which would you get?

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If you were buying a set of skewers, which would you get?

Old 08-27-12, 06:42 AM
  #26  
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Any of the J&L titanium skewers on Ebay are really good at a fraction of the price of KCNC and others.
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Old 08-27-12, 08:39 AM
  #27  
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Depends how big you are and how stiff your frame is, but I would recommend something with an internal cam that relies on something other than a plastic cam bed.

After 1200 miles on a stiffer frame, I started getting consistent brake rub on the rear wheel, whenever I put power down. Drove me nuts, and it took along time to figure out. Bottom line -- it was the salsa skewers...the plastic external cam bed was chewed up, and the axle was flexing in the dropouts as a result. I put on a set of Ultegras and the problem is gone.
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Old 08-27-12, 08:50 AM
  #28  
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Salsa Ti skewers. Thousands of trouble-free riding with Salsa skewers.
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Old 08-27-12, 10:03 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by adrien View Post
Depends how big you are and how stiff your frame is, but I would recommend something with an internal cam that relies on something other than a plastic cam bed.

After 1200 miles on a stiffer frame, I started getting consistent brake rub on the rear wheel, whenever I put power down. Drove me nuts, and it took along time to figure out. Bottom line -- it was the salsa skewers...the plastic external cam bed was chewed up, and the axle was flexing in the dropouts as a result. I put on a set of Ultegras and the problem is gone.
Bingo. I couldn't have put it better. I'm on a Tarmac Sl3 and hover around 210lbs and 6'2"

That plastic is chewed up and would like a set that does not have that.
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Old 08-27-12, 10:05 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by bikepro View Post
A perfect match for your $100. wheelset
Yup. $100 wheelset.
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Old 08-27-12, 10:31 AM
  #31  
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DuraAce Skewers the mechanical leverage on them is like nothing else to me the open can close like butter but are very tight.
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Old 08-27-12, 10:34 AM
  #32  
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https://www.ebay.com/itm/AEST-Titaniu...item1c29d0adcb
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Old 08-27-12, 10:59 AM
  #33  
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The Dura-Ace ones I have are more than 20 years old and still work better than any other ones I've tried.
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Old 08-27-12, 11:07 AM
  #34  
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The DT Swiss ones are nice. I didn't think I'd like them, but they work well, and weigh almost nothing.
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Old 08-27-12, 11:19 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Commodus View Post
The Dura-Ace ones I have are more than 20 years old and still work better than any other ones I've tried.
Shimano skewers are the best. Internal cam mechanism, steel rod, alloy lever and steel threads on the adjustable nut. Bombproof and lightweight. It appears that Shimano skewers from about LX/105 and up are essentially the same.

I have some so-called high-end non-Shimano units which have the the external cams. They are harder to adjust and require more hand force to get adequate retention. There is no way I am going to risk my life using skewers with titanium rods, or threaded alloy adjustable nuts.

I think Sheldon Brown has an article on skewers that lays out the issues. As always, Sheldon or Jobst Brandt are always right.
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Old 08-27-12, 11:40 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by tcwayne View Post
Bingo. I couldn't have put it better. I'm on a Tarmac Sl3 and hover around 210lbs and 6'2"

That plastic is chewed up and would like a set that does not have that.
I'm an inch taller, on a steel bike, and a wee bit lighter than you. As with others, I'd say go shimano. I also got a pair of FSA skewers, which seem pretty nice. But I haven't pushed them enough to know how good they are.
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Old 08-27-12, 12:13 PM
  #37  
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I suspect going with a Dura Ace skewer for at least the rear would be a good idea.
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Old 08-27-12, 12:20 PM
  #38  
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I like light weight components, my R5 is right at 14 lbs and that is with an SRM, but steel is real IMHO when it comes to skewers. I want those things clamped down as right as possible for the stiffest front (and rear) end possible for rock-solid high speed descending, and with the DT Swiss RWS skewers in steel, there is nothing that lets you clamp down harder. This is one area where I will gladly give up some grams, and it doesn't hurt that they are significantly cheaper in the steel version vs titanium.
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Old 08-27-12, 12:25 PM
  #39  
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Of all the things I have considered upgradign on my bike. Skewers have not once come to my attention.
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Old 08-27-12, 12:41 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by tcwayne View Post
I want different skewers so I'm looking around. Gimme some ideas.
NOS 1999-2006 Campagnolo Record. Sexiest skewers ever made (the cut-out is a nice touch). Equipped with internal cams so they're tenacious.

Not cheap (I saw one set sell for $140), but the best rarely is.



Velo Orange has some that are almost as nice (no D-ring on the nut) for just $18/pair

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Old 08-27-12, 02:37 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by refthimos View Post
DT Swiss RWS. The best.
...unless you have a frame with breezer dropouts, and then those RWS skewers are a serious PIA to use.

I agree they look badass and I love the concept, but I can only use them on one of my road bikes. (Fortunately, both my road bikes have DT Swiss hubs, so I'm not committing a fashion faux pas.) And ultimately, a more traditional cam-actuated skewer is still easier to use.
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Old 08-27-12, 03:49 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
...unless you have a frame with breezer dropouts, and then those RWS skewers are a serious PIA to use.

I agree they look badass and I love the concept, but I can only use them on one of my road bikes. (Fortunately, both my road bikes have DT Swiss hubs, so I'm not committing a fashion faux pas.) And ultimately, a more traditional cam-actuated skewer is still easier to use.
On most Breezer-style dropouts I have seen, you will still be able to rotate the RWS skewer almost 180 degrees before you will come up against the dropout, at which time you disengage the "gear" lever, rotate back 180 degrees, tighten and repeat. It's sorta like on a crank that you could only rotate 180 degrees - starting with your right foot at 12 o'clock, you would pedal to 6 o'clock, then freewheel backwards until your right foot got to 12 o'clock again, then repeat.

I don't think I ever need more than one rotation or two to tighten my RWS skewers (and I tighten them CRAZY tight - use lots of grease on the threads!) so a Breezer style dropout might add 3-4 seconds to my skewer tightening exercise, but that's about it.

If you are road racing with team support following you, then the up to 10 seconds it takes you to get an RWS skewer loose (I am thinking worst case scenario, Breezer dropouts, tired hands, etc) may be a deal-killer for you. But for anyone else, I am not sure it matters. Even in a crit you'll get a free lap and (assuming you can get to the pit) the slight time penalty should not be a real issue. For me, I'm happy to trade those 3-10 seconds for what I view as the most secure and stiff wheel connection possible. 99% of my rides do not involve a wheel change, while >90% do involve some hard cornering/descending at speed, which is where I am happy I have my RWS skewers. So I think I am coming out ahead.
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Old 08-27-12, 03:57 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
...unless you have a frame with breezer dropouts, and then those RWS skewers are a serious PIA to use.

I agree they look badass and I love the concept, but I can only use them on one of my road bikes. (Fortunately, both my road bikes have DT Swiss hubs, so I'm not committing a fashion faux pas.) And ultimately, a more traditional cam-actuated skewer is still easier to use.
I would also bet the internal cam skewers can produce higher clamping forces than the DT Swiss RWS. Of course, that's not really the goal because you really only need "just enough" clamping force, but...
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Old 08-27-12, 04:15 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by johnybutts View Post
Of all the things I have considered upgradign on my bike. Skewers have not once come to my attention.
A typical roadie can spend $60 and get rid of 80 grams. The same weight savings in a fork will set you back $300+.
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Old 08-27-12, 04:25 PM
  #45  
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Two of my road bikes have ti skewers purchased via eBay. Super light compared to the skewers that came with my wheels. Can't say I've ever heard of problems, except for the one mentioned above in this thread, and I'm happy with mine. It was an inexpensive way to lose a quarter pound off the bikes.
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Old 08-27-12, 04:40 PM
  #46  
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I love bike bling but, honestly, different skewers aren't going to do squat for you.

I would think of something else to upgrade.
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Old 08-27-12, 05:35 PM
  #47  
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Skewer 'upgrades' tend to be a downgrade in every respect except weight. Basic Shimano/Campy ones are excellent, but not the lightest, and for good reason. Do you really want an ultralight part keeping your wheels secure and you from crashing?
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Old 08-27-12, 06:02 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by tcwayne View Post
Well fragile is not good, if that's common with KCNC. My goal is, easy on/off, lightweight, retain tension and something I do not have "play" with to keep the hubs form making any noise.
I think I summed it up with more than a bling issue. It's not about bling and more about function. I'm thinking the shimano skewers are what I need. Durable and long lasting.
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Old 08-27-12, 06:42 PM
  #49  
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Dura ace skewers really do snug up nicely.
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Old 08-27-12, 06:49 PM
  #50  
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Salsa Fiip Offs'
They are the Thompson seat post of skewers, IMHO
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