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My luck finally ran out.. first flat today.

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My luck finally ran out.. first flat today.

Old 10-07-12, 10:42 PM
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My luck finally ran out.. first flat today.

About 10 miles from home... called the fiancé and luckily had her come pick me up. I've been testing my luck for the last few months. I don't really want to carry an under saddle bag... do any of you guys just carry c02+tube in your jerseys??

Also, there is a pin hole puncture in my tire... should I worry about patching that up once i replace the tube or does that even matter? I suppose small debris etc could sneak into there.
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Old 10-07-12, 11:07 PM
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I prefer to have a saddlebag with emergency supplies (new tube, tire levers, multitool, edited to add: also stick-on patches for the rare multi-flat ride) and then a small minipump held on by a bracket mounted at the bottle cage braze ons. But that's because I always forgot something, like taking a spare tube but forgetting the pump.

If the tire casing is intact (the threads of the fabric/casing that give the tire shape shouldn't be cut), I'd just ride the tire or maybe superglue or shoe goo any gap in the rubber tread closed. If the casing is cut, the problem isn't debris getting in the tire, but the fact that the tube will bulge at the weak spot and could eventually push through and pop.

Last edited by milkbaby; 10-08-12 at 12:13 PM.
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Old 10-07-12, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by DevinL
About 10 miles from home... called the fiancé and luckily had her come pick me up. I've been testing my luck for the last few months. I don't really want to carry an under saddle bag... do any of you guys just carry c02+tube in your jerseys??

Also, there is a pin hole puncture in my tire... should I worry about patching that up once i replace the tube or does that even matter? I suppose small debris etc could sneak into there.
Carry two tubes in your jersey. Two is one and one is none.
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Old 10-07-12, 11:30 PM
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What about C02? They make small enough pumps dont they?
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Old 10-07-12, 11:57 PM
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I just carry one tube, 2 CO2's, a CO2 inflator and a patch kit. If I flat more than twice on a ride, bleh. If I carry 3 CO2's I can fix three. 4, 4, etc. Patch kit is good and doesn't take up space. The extra tube is just to have an easy time the first time (shouldn't be a 2nd time).

I used to carry around a hand pump, but after being stuck on the road in 115 degrees trying to pump furiously... Nope. Plus, the leftover CO2 is some nice A/C

As for the pin hole puncture in your tire, it depends... How big is it? How much tread do you have on your tire?
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Old 10-08-12, 12:00 AM
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Depends how far from town you are going.
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Old 10-08-12, 02:45 AM
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The pump attaches to the bicycle.

Don't forget tire levers.
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Old 10-08-12, 06:45 AM
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That's pretty hardcore... First off - keep the Fiancee'. If she's willing to come and get you for a flat 10 miles from town, you've got it MADE...

In the interest of self-reliance, many choose to carry a tube and one of the fancy tools that include a tire lever, chain tool, and the various allens, etc. all in one. I really don't think a pump attached to a cage takes up too much space/weight, nor does a tiny under saddle bag - but hey, if she'll come and get you at the drop of a hat - why bother?? ;-)
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Old 10-08-12, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by BykOfALesserGod
Carry two tubes in your jersey. Two is one and one is none.
+1. Flats and the Sith always come in pairs.
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Old 10-08-12, 07:14 AM
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A tube, two levers, a multitool all crammed into a lezyne seat bag and a small pump in my pocket all for any daily ride. Riding without some self-repair capability is silly - unless you have wheel truck behind your or a spare bike in the pits...
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Old 10-08-12, 07:37 AM
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I don't carry anything and didnt flat for months until the day I did, luckily it happened in my driveway...still trying to figure that one out
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Old 10-08-12, 07:38 AM
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Wow, only one flat? I've had so many this summer it isn't funny. I carry a spare tube, glueless patches, levers and a CO2 pump in a saddle bag and a hand pump on the cage and I've used them a lot. All could fit in jersey pockets if you want, but I like always having it on the bike. The glueless patches are temporary and have to be replaced with real patches at home after the ride.

My friends call my saddle bag a bike scrotum, but it's saved me so often that I can take the ribbing.
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Old 10-08-12, 07:44 AM
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Had my first flat last week (just returned to riding about a year ago). First experience changing a tire roadside and inflating w/ CO2. Blew the first canister by not screwing it into the adapter quickly enough. And promptly broke one of my tire tools. But I was still back on the road in 15 minutes. Finished the ride without needing to call my wife to rescue me. I carry a phone for that purpose, but it feels better to be self-reliant.
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Old 10-08-12, 07:45 AM
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I've done 2800 miles without a flat, but I carry a spare tube, (2) CO2 and a multitool. Went on a 60 mile ride Saturday with 15 others and there were 4 flats along the way. First one was 100 yards from the start. It was a omen to what was ahead. Lucky for me my record is still intact.

It better to be prepared than to walk home.
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Old 10-08-12, 08:01 AM
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You haven't had a flat in MONTHS? You ride without ANY tools or equipment? You called for help because of a FLAT TIRE?
Dude, you deserve to walk.
I have to laugh when I read stuff like "I've done 2800 miles without a flat." I rode 125 miles last week and had THREE flats, which is just a little higher than average. I've had nine on a century. Big thorns around here...

Last edited by Velo Dog; 10-08-12 at 08:05 AM.
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Old 10-08-12, 08:05 AM
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It's a good idea to save the girlfriend interventions for serious problems and support at races.

You can carry stuff to fix flats and minor mechanical problems in your jersey pockets but that greatly increases the chances of forgetting something. It also takes up pocket space that's needed for food and clothes on long rides.

I don't understand the reluctance to use seat bags. Pros don't use them in races because they have support cars following them.... they do when they are out training on their own. They even use fenders when it's appropriate. Trying to look "pro" with your equipment alone is dumb- experienced cyclists see if you're experienced by looking at how you ride, not by your gear. A fred with carbon wheels and no seat bag is still a fred.
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Old 10-08-12, 08:14 AM
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Most of us who don't use saddle bags just don't like saddle bags, we Arnt trying to look pro. I carry nothing because I don't want to carry anything and when I get a flat it's my problem. If I was trying to look pro I wouldn't be riding 14mph.
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Old 10-08-12, 08:27 AM
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Flats are infrequent, but not rare enough that you really want to be riding without a flat kit if you're riding for significant distances.

If all your trips are under 10 miles round trip, I could def see not worrying about a flat kit since it's close enough to home that it's no hassle as long as you have a pickup person. Still, changing flats is definitely a required skill for anybody who's going to ride their bike several times a week for more than trivial distances. It's going to happen, and multiple times at that. Flat kits are also so inexpensive that it's no excuse not to have one. You can stash the whole thing, CO2 and all in a jersey pocket - don't even need a saddle bag if you're not into it.

I used to thing WTF? to the no saddle bag thing, but I understand now, as some bikes come with these aerodynamic blade-shaped seatposts that make a saddle bag hard to fit properly without it bouncing all over the place. (My Cervelo has this problem.) That and the fact that if you just spent $5k on an aero-framed bike and another $2k on wheels, putting a saddle bag dangling off the aero seatpost would probably offset some of those dollars per aero. (Ironman triathletes obsess over the aeroness of a water bottle - there's a 10+ forum post serious debate on the effects of a STRAW from an aerodynamic bottle on slowtwitch.com if you don't believe me.)

Last edited by hhnngg1; 10-08-12 at 08:32 AM.
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Old 10-08-12, 08:47 AM
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I have Lezyne bags/pouches that fit into my jersey pocket. I carry two levers, a couple CO2 cartridges, the inflator head, spare tube, and a patch kit. I put the pouch in my helmet after each ride and never forget to take it. Also I often take a mini pump because it helps find the source of flat and starting the inflation to make sure the tube isn't caught under he bead but its not a necessity.
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Old 10-08-12, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Donsell
Wow, only one flat? I've had so many this summer it isn't funny. I carry a spare tube, glueless patches, levers and a CO2 pump in a saddle bag and a hand pump on the cage and I've used them a lot. All could fit in jersey pockets if you want, but I like always having it on the bike. The glueless patches are temporary and have to be replaced with real patches at home after the ride.

My friends call my saddle bag a bike scrotum, but it's saved me so often that I can take the ribbing.
The anti-seat bag thing is hilarious, and IMO a sure sign of a poseur. I do a lot of group rides, including one sponsored by a shop which involves people who actually race. Of course, the A group starts first, but almost every single one of them carry a seat bag under their saddles. The bag itself weighs almost nothing, and the stuff inside it weighs the same whether it's in the bag or in your pockets.
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Old 10-08-12, 09:30 AM
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You can patch just about any tube short of large razor/glass cuts, so you could get by most situations with nothing but a small lenzyne pump and a tiny pack of stick-on patches in the jersey pocket (plus a single tire lever).

Replace tube or patch with a permanent patch when you get home.

I would skip the CO2 unless you ride ride in a group or decide to get a saddle bag.

Last edited by colombo357; 10-08-12 at 09:40 AM.
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Old 10-08-12, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by mprelaw
The anti-seat bag thing is hilarious, and IMO a sure sign of a poseur. I do a lot of group rides, including one sponsored by a shop which involves people who actually race. Of course, the A group starts first, but almost every single one of them carry a seat bag under their saddles. The bag itself weighs almost nothing, and the stuff inside it weighs the same whether it's in the bag or in your pockets.
I race and carry a bag on one bike but many people don't. The majority of fast riders I see don't and I travel a lot and see rides all over the place.

Part is asthetics - people spend a lot and care about looks and a bag hanging under the saddle detracts from that. Another is getting a bag that fits well. Hhnngg1 already mentioned the problem with aero seat posts. I have one and I can't get the strap to fit snug. Another is most bags stick out past the end of narrow saddles. Finally co2 and other things in the bag make noise. It's real easy o put things in a bag and stick it in my jersey pocket.
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Old 10-08-12, 09:57 AM
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I zip tie a small bag on to the bars.

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Old 10-08-12, 09:58 AM
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^^^^^^^
Love the horn.
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Old 10-08-12, 09:58 AM
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Nice horn!
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