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Fulcrum Racing 3 vs Mavic Cosmic Elite

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Fulcrum Racing 3 vs Mavic Cosmic Elite

Old 11-04-12, 06:00 AM
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hscycling
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Fulcrum Racing 3 vs Mavic Cosmic Elite

Hi, I do ride 50-60km on a weekend and it's been almost 4 years now.
Recent two months, me and a friend has achieved 30kph average speed for ~50km ride on a slightly hilly road, and we really glad with that result.
Now I'd like to increase the average speed to 35kph and thinking to upgrade my wheelset.
Currently I'm still using a 3 years Fulcrum Racing 7 with Boca Bearing upgrade -- which is it's fine -- but I need more speed.

As my budget is limited, which one I should choose for an upgrade: Fulcrum Racing 3 or Mavic Cosmic Elite? Both are around $500.
You might also know/notice that Elite has 30mm rim which is a slightly 'aero' design.

Please advice. Thanks!
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Old 11-04-12, 06:50 AM
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Buying new stuff for one's bike is always fun. However, no wheelset is going to give you a 5 kph speed increase. Only riding more and doing targeted workouts will do that. New wheels can help with comfort and handling, and that's what I'd look for if I were convinced I needed new wheels.
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Old 11-04-12, 07:08 AM
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I am a huge fan of Fulcrum wheels owning two sets of Fulcrum 5's. I can afford Fulcrum 0's but choose the 5's for the strength and flex. Fulcrum's 3's and 0's are very stiff and are meant for racing without compromise to ride quality. Because they are lighter, they will also be a bit more fragile.
Fulcrum 5's or 7's aren't uber stiff but plenty stiff enough for my 185#'s and they NEVER go out of true and I ride very rough roads and sometimes at close to 30 mph. OP...you can't buy game bro. No wheels will make you faster. The Fulcrum 7's you have are fine...especically at your level. The bearing upgrade you made to the wheels is a waste of money. Fulcrum uses very high quality cartridge bearings in their 7's and 5's.
If you want speed, start training, drop weight and increase muscle mass. Spend the money on a strength conditioning regiment at your gym. Work on your position on the bike. Improve your pedal stroke so you can ride a higher RPM.
A pro on a clunker will drop 99% of the guys on this forum because it ain't about the bike or the wheels...especially at the recreational level.
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Old 11-04-12, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
Fulcrum's 3's and 0's are very stiff and are meant for racing without compromise to ride quality.
You need to read up on what wheel stiffness can and (mostly) can't do for ride quality.
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Old 11-04-12, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by canam73 View Post
You need to read up on what wheel stiffness can and (mostly) can't do for ride quality.
Rather...you need to test ride a variety of wheels. Have you tested different Fulcrum wheels? There is a noticable difference in stiffness...which is expected. Racers love super stiff wheels and frames. Rec riders?...not so much. I prefer Fulcrum 5's to Fulcrum 3's for example and not because of cost...but because of ride quality. Fulcrum 5's hit the sweet spot for me. They aren't bone jarring but stiff enough when sprinting out of the saddle. If you are a competitive rider and a climber in particular, then a 1500g super stiff wheelset may make sense. But for the average guy a lower end wheelset like the Fulcrum 5's are 'better' and considering the cost difference you pay for those 200g's, Fulcrum 3's as good as they are, are a waste of money for the average cyclist at almost twice the cost of Fulcrum 5's.
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Old 11-04-12, 09:52 AM
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Shorten your rides a bit and get used to riding faster. Once you can ride at the speed you want, begin increasing the distance again. If you're set on your route - do some recreational intervals, pick maybe a 5K section and up the pace to what you want to be able to hit, then recover and do it again if you can. You get faster by riding faster.

All that being said, new bike stuff is great. Both of the wheelsets are good options - I would choose the wheels that your favorite shop carries. That way, and problems will be quickly taken care of. Also, in service of riding faster, developing that relationship and finding new people to add to your list of riding buddies will do wonders.
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Old 11-04-12, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
Rather...you need to test ride a variety of wheels. Have you tested different Fulcrum wheels? There is a noticable difference in stiffness...which is expected. Racers love super stiff wheels and frames. Rec riders?...not so much. I prefer Fulcrum 5's to Fulcrum 3's for example and not because of cost...but because of ride quality. Fulcrum 5's hit the sweet spot for me. They aren't bone jarring but stiff enough when sprinting out of the saddle. If you are a competitive rider and a climber in particular, then a 1500g super stiff wheelset may make sense. But for the average guy a lower end wheelset like the Fulcrum 5's are 'better' and considering the cost difference you pay for those 200g's, Fulcrum 3's as good as they are, are a waste of money for the average cyclist at almost twice the cost of Fulcrum 5's.
No.

If you are trying for a comfy ride through wheel flex you are doing it wrong. That's what different tires and PSIs are for.

No well built wheels should flex in a noticeable manner under standard power outputs, meaning the 98% you aren't at a full sprint or attacking on a steep pitch. That 2% of the time isn't encountered during Rec. riding.

Read this: https://www.rouesartisanales.com/article-23159755.html I know the models are out of date, but unless Fulcrum completely changed their philosophy (and is way different than every other large wheel manufacturer) their high end wheels are not stiffer than the 5 or 7.
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Old 11-04-12, 08:08 PM
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Thank you for your suggestion and opinion.

I'll keep training as much as I can.

I still believe a wheelset has "something" that will improve the speed. I also just replace my old Ultremo ZX to Vittoria Open Corsa Evo II + latex tube - and I can feel the different - say it adds 2kph from my previous record.
I am able to reach and maintain my speed at 37-38kph on low HR, but once I push more up to 40kph then I'm done (can see my video here. Start from 0:45 my HR quickly went up to 160s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YLbz4EPYBg).

My concern was Fulcrum Racing 3 is lighter than Mavic Cosmic Elite but Elite has 30mm deep rim.
So lighter versus aero?
Fulcrum Racing 5 has aero's spokes. Does it do any thing?
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Old 11-04-12, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
I am a huge fan of Fulcrum wheels owning two sets of Fulcrum 5's. I can afford Fulcrum 0's but choose the 5's for the strength and flex. Fulcrum's 3's and 0's are very stiff and are meant for racing without compromise to ride quality. Because they are lighter, they will also be a bit more fragile.
Fulcrum 5's or 7's aren't uber stiff but plenty stiff enough for my 185#'s and they NEVER go out of true and I ride very rough roads and sometimes at close to 30 mph. OP...you can't buy game bro. No wheels will make you faster. The Fulcrum 7's you have are fine...especically at your level. The bearing upgrade you made to the wheels is a waste of money. Fulcrum uses very high quality cartridge bearings in their 7's and 5's.
If you want speed, start training, drop weight and increase muscle mass. Spend the money on a strength conditioning regiment at your gym. Work on your position on the bike. Improve your pedal stroke so you can ride a higher RPM.
A pro on a clunker will drop 99% of the guys on this forum because it ain't about the bike or the wheels...especially at the recreational level.
I have a set of Fulcrum Zero Comp Ltd. Edition on my Colnago C59.

I have a set of Campagnolo Eurus on my Bianchi Infinito.

And I also own a set of Fulcrum 5 that came originally with my Bianchi.

I agree with you that at the recreational level higher average speeds have more to do with training than with wheels.

I also agree wiht you that a pro can drop a recreational rider even if the pro is riding on lead wheels.

I disagree with you, however, on your assessment of the Fulcrum Zero wheels. Those wheels are stiff AND comfortable (a seeming paradox). Ride comfort has more to do with tire choice than with actual stiffness. A flexy wheel is not more comfortable than a stif wheel. I run Veloflex tires on both bikes, with Vittoria latex inner tubes. The ride on both the Colnago and the Bianchi is supremely comfortable.

I expect my Fulcrum wheels (and the Campy wheels) to be as long lasting as my other wheelsets.

And yes, Fulcrum wheels are great!
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Old 11-04-12, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by hscycling View Post
Thank you for your suggestion and opinion.

I'll keep training as much as I can.

I still believe a wheelset has "something" that will improve the speed. I also just replace my old Ultremo ZX to Vittoria Open Corsa Evo II + latex tube - and I can feel the different - say it adds 2kph from my previous record.
I am able to reach and maintain my speed at 37-38kph on low HR, but once I push more up to 40kph then I'm done (can see my video here. Start from 0:45 my HR quickly went up to 160s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YLbz4EPYBg).

My concern was Fulcrum Racing 3 is lighter than Mavic Cosmic Elite but Elite has 30mm deep rim.
So lighter versus aero?
Fulcrum Racing 5 has aero's spokes. Does it do any thing?
The whole "lighter vs. aero" debate on wheels goes on and on (a simple Google search will reveal the tip of the iceberg). To sum it up, however, I'll say this: Neither one is really going to make you an average of 5kph faster. New wheels feel great though, and if that makes you ride more and/or faster, then that's how you're really going to increase your speed.
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Old 11-04-12, 09:39 PM
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Buy whichever wheelset looks cool to you and can support your weight. No wheelset is magical enough to give you a 5 kph increase in speed, so that's a non-issue...
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Old 11-05-12, 02:02 AM
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Aerobars and aerohelmet save your more watts than those wheels and will be cheaper too
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Old 11-05-12, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia View Post
I have a set of Fulcrum Zero Comp Ltd. Edition on my Colnago C59.

I have a set of Campagnolo Eurus on my Bianchi Infinito.

And I also own a set of Fulcrum 5 that came originally with my Bianchi.

I agree with you that at the recreational level higher average speeds have more to do with training than with wheels.

I also agree wiht you that a pro can drop a recreational rider even if the pro is riding on lead wheels.

I disagree with you, however, on your assessment of the Fulcrum Zero wheels. Those wheels are stiff AND comfortable (a seeming paradox). Ride comfort has more to do with tire choice than with actual stiffness. A flexy wheel is not more comfortable than a stif wheel. I run Veloflex tires on both bikes, with Vittoria latex inner tubes. The ride on both the Colnago and the Bianchi is supremely comfortable.

I expect my Fulcrum wheels (and the Campy wheels) to be as long lasting as my other wheelsets.

And yes, Fulcrum wheels are great!
I will defer to you as you own both Fulcrum 0's and 5's. I guess the paradox you describe of stiffer not being less comfortable is a paradox if not debate. In some ways it is the same argument as frame stiffness. Some will prefer a certain level of stiffness...some like uber stiff frames and others not so much. The not so much clan is comprised of Roubaix versus Tarmac riders. Some will prefer the more compliant ride of the Roubaix. The tire creating compliance debate intersperced with wheel stiffness is a moot argument. If you hang out on mtb forums you will learn that wheel stiffness is a major element of the ride equation. Guys that ride off road are pretty focused on ride quality because they are trying to protect their bodies over grueling conditions. What do they do when it comes to tires? Not only do they sag pressures by running tubeless but are going to 29ers which inherently have flexier wheels. All you have to do is experiment with different wheelsets off road to know one that is more forgiving over the bumps versus not.
The same applies to road bikes. You can't say tune ride compliancy with tire selection and in particular pressure as canan stated. First, one should never tune ride quality with tire pressure. Tire pressure for optimal footprint should be based upon load and deflection. So, a false argument. Further, take two bikes with the softest possible tires and the lowest pressure and the bike with the flexier wheels will have more ride compliancy. This isn't an either or scenerio. Same argument for stiff frameset. A softer frame with softest tire will give a better ride than stiff frame with same softest tire.

The speed versus stiffness debate is also highly contentious and has been argued on the 41. The whole argument of energy not being conserved or somehow lost by a frame or wheelset being less than truck axle stiff is the other argument when it comes to performance versus comfort. A good rider on a whippy frame with flexible wheels will drop an average rider on a super stiff frame with super stiff wheels...every time. Oh the stiff bike may feel faster to both...but that is feel. Porshes feel faster going down the road than BMW's as well at the same speed...having owned both. I really believe that is the dynamic more at play...feel that gives the illusion of power transmission or performance.
Congrats on all the great bikes and thanks for your comments. Wheel discussions are never fully agreed upon.

Last edited by Campag4life; 11-05-12 at 06:36 AM.
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Old 11-05-12, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
I will defer to you as you own both Fulcrum 0's and 5's. I guess the paradox you describe of stiffer not being less comfortable is a paradox if not debate. In some ways it is the same argument as frame stiffness. Some will prefer a certain level of stiffness...some like uber stiff frames and others not so much. The not so much clan is comprised of Roubaix versus Tarmac riders. Some will prefer the more compliant ride of the Roubaix. The tire creating compliance debate intersperced with wheel stiffness is a moot argument. If you hang out on mtb forums you will learn that wheel stiffness is a major element of the ride equation. Guys that ride off road are pretty focused on ride quality because they are trying to protect their bodies over grueling conditions. What do they do when it comes to tires? Not only do they sag pressures by running tubeless but are going to 29ers which inherently have flexier wheels. All you have to do is experiment with different wheelsets off road to know one that is more forgiving over the bumps versus not.
The same applies to road bikes. You can't say tune ride compliancy with tire selection and in particular pressure as canan stated. First, one should never tune ride quality with tire pressure. Tire pressure for optimal footprint should be based upon load and deflection. So, a false argument. Further, take two bikes with the softest possible tires and the lowest pressure and the bike with the flexier wheels will have more ride compliancy. This isn't an either or scenerio. Same argument for stiff frameset. A softer frame with softest tire will give a better ride than stiff frame with same softest tire.

The speed versus stiffness debate is also highly contentious and has been argued on the 41. The whole argument of energy not being conserved or somehow lost by a frame or wheelset being less than truck axle stiff is the other argument when it comes to performance versus comfort. A good rider on a whippy frame with flexible wheels will drop an average rider on a super stiff frame with super stiff wheels...every time. Oh the stiff bike may feel faster to both...but that is feel. Porshes feel faster going down the road than BMW's as well at the same speed...having owned both. I really believe that is the dynamic more at play...feel that gives the illusion of power transmission or performance.
Congrats on all the great bikes and thanks for your comments. Wheel discussions are never fully agreed upon.
I didn't say to tune ride quality with tire pressure alone, I said to tune it with a combination of tire size and appropriate pressure. But even past that there are still many who over inflate their tires on a mistaken notion that it makes them faster and then look for other places to compensate for a crappy ride. In those cases they can in fact improve their ride with a pressure reduction alone.

And this is not anything like the argument over frame stiffness. Frames are specifically designed to have some controlled compliance, especially in the vertical plane. Road bike wheels are not. Flex in wheels fatigues the metals which will lead premature failure of spoke and rims. But you don't have to worry about it because that Fulcrum 5 set that you enjoy has one of the stiffest rear wheels on the market.
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Old 11-05-12, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by canam73 View Post
I didn't say to tune ride quality with tire pressure alone, I said to tune it with a combination of tire size and appropriate pressure. But even past that there are still many who over inflate their tires on a mistaken notion that it makes them faster and then look for other places to compensate for a crappy ride. In those cases they can in fact improve their ride with a pressure reduction alone.

And this is not anything like the argument over frame stiffness. Frames are specifically designed to have some controlled compliance, especially in the vertical plane. Road bike wheels are not. Flex in wheels fatigues the metals which will lead premature failure of spoke and rims. But you don't have to worry about it because that Fulcrum 5 set that you enjoy has one of the stiffest rear wheels on the market.
It doesn't matter if 'you believe' that wheels aren't designed with what you coin controlled compliance. First, if you believe that wheel designers don't understand the effect to ride quality of the wheels they design, you are sadly mistaken. They do. The reality is, wheels do end up with a given level of flex based upon design and weight limitations generally related to cost of materials which affects ride quality. By design, wheels vary in flex and affect to ride...sometimes dramatically.
If you have never ridden Fulcrum 0 or 3 wheels...they feel stiffer than 5's. Just read any review on line. They are clearly stiffer.
As to your assertion about a Fulcrum 5 rear wheel being one of the stiffest on the market, that is in question as well. While I believe Fulcrum 5's are adequately stiff...it is their 'medium' stiffness that makes them such a great training wheel over poor road surfaces in particular. Plus they are bombproof.
Here is a review of Fulcrum 5's below that refutes your comment about how stiff a Fulcrum 5 rear wheel is. The 200 lb rider thought the wheels were borderline noodly which I think is off...but maybe for a 1500w sprinter. To me the 5's at 185 lbs are stiff enough for the average rider.
https://www.bikewheelsets.com/reviews...eelset-review/

Last edited by Campag4life; 11-05-12 at 10:41 AM.
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Old 11-05-12, 11:03 AM
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Campag4life, I am not entirely convinced about the comfort of a flexier frame being more comfortable than a stiffer frame. My Infinito is flexier than the C59--in fact the C59 is internally ribbed for additional stiffness.

Both bikes are identically equipped except for the wheels (as noted above).

On long rides, 75+ miles I swear to you, the C59 feels more comfortable. I feel "fresher" after a long ride on the C59 than I do after a long ride on the Infinito.

I know this goes contrary toyour opinion, but it is based on what my body is telling me after long rides on both bikes.

Incidentally, the Veloflex tires with latex inner tubes are just the shizzle! I won't talk about how I am getting fewer flats because...oh merde, I did it. I've just cursed myself. Sacre bleu!

Thanks for the compliment about the bikes. I do love riding my Italian bici, all of them.
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Old 11-05-12, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
It doesn't matter if 'you believe' that wheels aren't designed with what you coin controlled compliance. First, if you believe that wheel designers don't understand the effect to ride quality of the wheels they design, you are sadly mistaken. They do. The reality is, wheels do end up with a given level of flex based upon design and weight which affects ride quality. Wheels vary in flex and affect to ride...sometimes dramatically.
If you have never ridden Fulcrum 0 or 3 wheels...they feel stiffer than 5's. Just read any review on line. They are clearly stiffer.
As to your assertion about a Fulcrum 5 rear wheel being one of the stiffest on the market, that is in question as well. While I believe Fulcrum 5's are adequately stiff...it is their 'medium' stiffness that makes them such a great training wheel over poor road surfaces in particular. Plus they are bombproof.
Here is a review of Fulcrum 5's below that refuses your comment about how stiff a Fulcrum 5 rear wheel is. The 200 lb rider thought the wheels were borderly noodly which I think is off...but he maybe a 1500w sprinter. To me the 5's at 185 lbs are stiff enough for the average rider.
https://www.bikewheelsets.com/reviews...eelset-review/
And here is a 205 lb reviewer who didn't have that problem: https://reviews.roadbikereview.com/fu...set-pro-review But i'm guessing you already read it since it's the first thing that came up on a google search. Wheelsets are individual and there will be variance, but perhaps Fulcrum should work on their quality control to produce a more consistent product.

And 'bombproof'? Ok. How is that tested anyway?

Wheel designers deal with flexibility all the time as they attempt to find a good balance between weight savings and stiffness. If they are Campy compatible (or Shimano 11sp) even more so as the flange offsets make the rear inherently less balanced.

But go back to the study I linked. If you don't want to believe the findings for the Fulcrum 5 then fine, it was a small sample and maybe things have changed some in the last 4 years. But look at the overall trends, especially in large makers like Fulcrum, Mavic and Shimano. If you throw out the highest and lowest from each one's offerings they are all pretty consistent on their values. Maybe you don't see it, but it appears to me that each has a standard they are building towards. Combined, those 3 makers are a large portion of the OEM market, so it also makes sense that they seem to favor stiffer but comparably heavy wheel, too, as they need to be durable for a wider range of rider weights and power outputs then some of the after market builders.
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Old 11-05-12, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by canam73 View Post
And here is a 205 lb reviewer who didn't have that problem: https://reviews.roadbikereview.com/fu...set-pro-review But i'm guessing you already read it since it's the first thing that came up on a google search. Wheelsets are individual and there will be variance, but perhaps Fulcrum should work on their quality control to produce a more consistent product.And 'bombproof'? Ok. How is that tested anyway?

Wheel designers deal with flexibility all the time as they attempt to find a good balance between weight savings and stiffness. If they are Campy compatible (or Shimano 11sp) even more so as the flange offsets make the rear inherently less balanced.

But go back to the study I linked. If you don't want to believe the findings for the Fulcrum 5 then fine, it was a small sample and maybe things have changed some in the last 4 years. But look at the overall trends, especially in large makers like Fulcrum, Mavic and Shimano. If you throw out the highest and lowest from each one's offerings they are all pretty consistent on their values. Maybe you don't see it, but it appears to me that each has a standard they are building towards. Combined, those 3 makers are a large portion of the OEM market, so it also makes sense that they seem to favor stiffer but comparably heavy wheel, too, as they need to be durable for a wider range of rider weights and power outputs then some of the after market builders.
Not much more to say to you...bold above. Ridiculous. Fulcrum wheels are probably the best machine built wheels on the planet as are all Campy wheels at their respective price points.
As to the 205 lb review you posted...I agree with him. I believe the Fulcrum 5's are substantially stiff. He also clearly stated the Fulcrum 5's will never be confused with stiffer racing wheels. No lower end training wheels are as stiff as light race wheels as a general rule. Apples and oranges.
Have fun.
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Old 11-05-12, 12:17 PM
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Canam73, FWIW, that's areview of the 2008 wheels. Changes have been made since then.
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Old 11-05-12, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia View Post
Canam73, FWIW, that's areview of the 2008 wheels. Changes have been made since then.
Yeah, fwiw, I noted that twice in this thread.
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Old 11-05-12, 12:27 PM
  #21  
Campag4life
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Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia View Post
Campag4life, I am not entirely convinced about the comfort of a flexier frame being more comfortable than a stiffer frame. My Infinito is flexier than the C59--in fact the C59 is internally ribbed for additional stiffness.

Both bikes are identically equipped except for the wheels (as noted above).

On long rides, 75+ miles I swear to you, the C59 feels more comfortable. I feel "fresher" after a long ride on the C59 than I do after a long ride on the Infinito.

I know this goes contrary toyour opinion, but it is based on what my body is telling me after long rides on both bikes.

Incidentally, the Veloflex tires with latex inner tubes are just the shizzle! I won't talk about how I am getting fewer flats because...oh merde, I did it. I've just cursed myself. Sacre bleu!

Thanks for the compliment about the bikes. I do love riding my Italian bici, all of them.
I think your analysis about comfort can be reduced down to fit. I presume the bikes are set up differently. Perhaps you don't think so, but that would be my guess. Fit trumps stiffness for comfort in my experience. I will tell you this applies to the Roubaix. Many believe the Roubaix SL3 to be a compliant bike. It is one of the stiffest bikes I have ever ridden. Plus there are really two types of stiffness....vertical stiffness and torsional stiffness. Bike designers try to divorce the two as much as possible...goal being a bike that won't crack your nuts over bumps but when you stand and sprint, you can't feel any flex.
I personally like a relatively stiff frame..and medium stiff wheels.

Speaking of Bianchis, years ago I bought a Veloce steelie...complete bike with Campy. The bike came with Campy Vento wheels with weird G3 spoke config on the front wheel as well as the rear wheel....which was rightly scoffed at by purists. Early Campy Vento wheels were 'whippy'. I could make the brake pads rub out of the saddle. Campy ultimately revised the design of the Vento to more conventional spoke pattern in the front wheel and were much better. I put Campy Zonda wheels on the Bianchi and the bike was transformed...much stiffer ride. Now the Veloce steelie was/is a fairly flexible frame...and Zonda wheels are mid range but medium stiff....not a bad combo really. But no comparison to the Roubaix...light years ahead in performance.
Cheers.

Last edited by Campag4life; 11-05-12 at 12:31 PM.
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Old 11-05-12, 12:51 PM
  #22  
canam73
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
Not much more to say to you...bold above. Ridiculous. Fulcrum wheels are probably the best machine built wheels on the planet as are all Campy wheels at their respective price points.
Well, somebody has to be, might as well be them. Kind of a dubious honor in my opinion.

Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
As to the 205 lb review you posted...I agree with him. I believe the Fulcrum 5's are substantially stiff. He also clearly stated the Fulcrum 5's will never be confused with stiffer racing wheels. No lower end training wheels are as stiff as light race wheels as a general rule. Apples and oranges.
Have fun.
No he didn't, he said he could feel a difference. A 205lb 'pro'. I've never heard of him, but that's not saying much. He also doesn't say what specifically he does consider to be stiff. But it is stiff enough that he suggests that some may want use a wider and more forgiving tire, and not that they keep looking for a more flexible wheel.

And once more I'll ask you to not take my word for it but to actually look at the data in those charts. Light weight racing wheels aren't shown to be stronger than the lower end wheels 'as a general rule'. But hey, they are 4 years old. Perhaps you can point me to some new information.
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Old 11-05-12, 01:12 PM
  #23  
eja_ bottecchia
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Originally Posted by canam73 View Post
Yeah, fwiw, I noted that twice in this thread.

I must have missed it while reading your otherwise scintallating posts. My apologies indeed!
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Old 11-05-12, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia View Post
I must have missed it while reading your otherwise scintallating posts. My apologies indeed!
So you read enough to think I over looked something that was worth posting about, but ended up being wrong about that. Brilliant.
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Old 11-05-12, 01:25 PM
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Campag4life
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Originally Posted by canam73 View Post
Well, somebody has to be, might as well be them. Kind of a dubious honor in my opinion.



No he didn't, he said he could feel a difference. A 205lb 'pro'. I've never heard of him, but that's not saying much. He also doesn't say what specifically he does consider to be stiff. But it is stiff enough that he suggests that some may want use a wider and more forgiving tire, and not that they keep looking for a more flexible wheel.

And once more I'll ask you to not take my word for it but to actually look at the data in those charts. Light weight racing wheels aren't shown to be stronger than the lower end wheels 'as a general rule'. But hey, they are 4 years old. Perhaps you can point me to some new information.
First, I don't take your word for anything...lol. I have enough experience with different level wheels. Second, I never said that light weight wheels are stronger than lower end wheels. In fact, anecdotally, racing wheels are weaker. Why? Because they feather the edge of lightness to reduce inertia and static weight. Lighter wheels with less spoke count can have less section modulus and hence tendency to bend...or crack or go out of true. Ask anybody who owns 36 spoke Open Pros why they ride them versus low spoke count carbon wheels on pot hole strune training rides.
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