Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

What waterproof jacket do you use?

Notices
Road Cycling It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle. -- Ernest Hemingway

What waterproof jacket do you use?

Old 11-30-12, 05:16 AM
  #1  
jxpowers
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 99
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What waterproof jacket do you use?

Im looking for a new one, the one i have now is this one

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B...ms_ohs_product

and wow its the worst!! i sweat like a pig in it and its not even waterproof

so i need reccomendations.

Im looking for breathability and waterproofing anything else im not really bothered about

also why are they so expensive, all the good ones are over 100? are there any cheaper ones but are almost as good at the expensive ones

Thanks
jxpowers is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 06:42 AM
  #2  
bigbadwullf
Senior Member
 
bigbadwullf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: West, Tn.
Posts: 1,761
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Cheap disposable poncho. Just something to wait out a shower. If it's raining I'm not riding.
bigbadwullf is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 08:07 AM
  #3  
banerjek
Portland Fred
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,548

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by jxpowers View Post
Im looking for a new one, the one i have now is this one

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B...ms_ohs_product

also why are they so expensive, all the good ones are over 100? are there any cheaper ones but are almost as good at the expensive ones
What you want requires a fair amount of technology and there are very few decent candidates -- none of which are cheap.

However, if you're willing to settle for water resistant rather than waterproof, much cheaper options that work well can be had. I would not recommend a disposable poncho or anything else that's just made of plastic unless your rides are short and you ride slowly.
banerjek is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 09:02 AM
  #4  
Looigi
Senior Member
 
Looigi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 8,951
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Basically, you will get wet, either from rain or sweat. IMO, the best that can be done for longer vigorous riding is having "windproof" "water-resistant" membrane on the front of the jacket and ordinary breezy fabric in the back. This lets moisture out and prevents the jacket from inflating or billowing. It won't keep you dry in the rain, but any jacket that will will soak you in sweat. The best that can be done in the rain is to accept getting wet and have wind blocking in the front and enough technical fabric and/or wool underneath to keep you from getting hypothermia.

The jacket I currently use is a Gore Phantom II which has a plain knit fabric back. It works pretty well, but there are other newer ones out that may be better.
Looigi is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 09:18 AM
  #5  
canam73
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Haunchyville
Posts: 6,400
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
Basically, you will get wet, either from rain or sweat. IMO, the best that can be done for longer vigorous riding is having "windproof" "water-resistant" membrane on the front of the jacket and ordinary breezy fabric in the back. This lets moisture out and prevents the jacket from inflating or billowing. It won't keep you dry in the rain, but any jacket that will will soak you in sweat. The best that can be done in the rain is to accept getting wet and have wind blocking in the front and enough technical fabric and/or wool underneath to keep you from getting hypothermia.

The jacket I currently use is a Gore Phantom II which has a plain knit fabric back. It works pretty well, but there are other newer ones out that may be better.
I follow the same scheme using this jacket which I highly recommend:

https://www.probikekit.com/us/endura-...FYYWMgodBH0Avg
canam73 is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 10:46 AM
  #6  
DGlenday
Senior Member
 
DGlenday's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Frederick, MD
Posts: 1,248

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
See here for a few reviews:

https://www.roadbikerider.com/newslet...er-new-roundup

https://www.roadbikerider.com/newslet...er-new-roundup

https://www.roadbikerider.com/newslet...er-new-roundup
DGlenday is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 11:08 AM
  #7  
Commodus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 4,144
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I have a packable Sugoi shell. Works well, it's about as breathable as anything I've used. It's almost waterproof.

It was over $100, I can't remember how much over.
Commodus is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 11:13 AM
  #8  
banerjek
Portland Fred
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,548

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
It won't keep you dry in the rain, but any jacket that will will soak you in sweat.
This is not entirely accurate. What is true is that breathable jackets don't work very well when it's warmer. However, a good jacket will keep you dry in cold rain (i.e. 30's and low 40's) even if you're hammering so long as you dress sufficiently lightly underneath.

As the temps increase, overheating becomes more of an issue. In many cases, it's just easier to figure out how to be comfortable and wet -- 33F and soaking wet is no big deal if you have the gear. However, if you'll be in changing conditions -- for example all day rides in mountains where precipitation, temps, and effort vary drastically, you'll be a lot more comfortable if you can dress much lighter and stay dry.
banerjek is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 11:21 AM
  #9  
david58
Senior Member
 
david58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Posts: 1,846

Bikes: Fuji Cross Comp, BMC SR02, Surly Krampas

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
Basically, you will get wet, either from rain or sweat. IMO, the best that can be done for longer vigorous riding is having "windproof" "water-resistant" membrane on the front of the jacket and ordinary breezy fabric in the back. This lets moisture out and prevents the jacket from inflating or billowing. It won't keep you dry in the rain, but any jacket that will will soak you in sweat. The best that can be done in the rain is to accept getting wet and have wind blocking in the front and enough technical fabric and/or wool underneath to keep you from getting hypothermia.

The jacket I currently use is a Gore Phantom II which has a plain knit fabric back. It works pretty well, but there are other newer ones out that may be better.
Breathable and waterproof is pretty much an oxymoron. Just ain't gonna happen. When the jacket is wet, no vapor can pass. When you exert yourself, you will sweat faster than the water resistant membrane case pass the vapor, and you get wet from condensation (sweat). Top that off that goretex fabrics are not going to be completely waterproof, and you just have a bunch of tradeoffs to decide on.

I have found that in all but really cold rain, I do best in my good old commuter-yellow Pearl Izumi lightweight jacket that has the zip-off sleeves. It is not an entirely effective wind block, which helps cool me. It works well enough for rain-resistance, particularly if I have layered properly, usually with wool involved (if in the warm weather, I just ride wet). For colder days, or heavier rain, I wear my Showers Pass, but it works for me due to the vent on the back and the long pit zips. But I can still out-sweat it.

The suggestion for the Gore Phantom II is good. I am less well-heeled, so I went with REI Novarra Headwind jacket and pants - wind and water resist fronts, plain fabric back. Works great in a wide variety of weather, though when it is really raining hard the jacket doesn't work since the whole back leaks, and the pants get kinda heavy with water. But they are good for what they do.

I have been wearing GoreTex since the original stuff came out. It has been a 40+ year love/hate relationship. Works great when it isn't really super wet or I am not exerting myself. But to stay dry in a good rain or while fishing, etc., I go for rubberized fabrics that are 100% waterproof. Watch "Dangerous Catch" - those boys don't wear goretex, would be the wrong choice.

Again, tradeoffs. And I still haven't mastered the art of layering up for my ride to/from work...
david58 is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 12:16 PM
  #10  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,650

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3020 Post(s)
Liked 936 Times in 709 Posts
Yes, that PI with the zip-off sleeves is good, but transition back to sleeves is a PITA. I still like a Performance Century jacket and a wind vest. I live in the PNW and never ride with a waterproof. I've tried, but if it's raining it's too hot and sweaty, and if it's snowing you don't need waterproof for sure. The thing to check is can whatever you get easily stuff into a jersey pocket. Nothing like being forced to suffer because you have nowhere to store the frigging thing when it stops raining.

Commuting or doing LSD is a somewhat different story, because you can usually moderate the effort to control your body temp.
Carbonfiberboy is online now  
Old 11-30-12, 12:21 PM
  #11  
david58
Senior Member
 
david58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Posts: 1,846

Bikes: Fuji Cross Comp, BMC SR02, Surly Krampas

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Yes, that PI with the zip-off sleeves is good, but transition back to sleeves is a PITA.
I will often just slip the sleeves back on without zipping them. Then I get more ventilation than if the jacket is full-up.
david58 is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 01:04 PM
  #12  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,650

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3020 Post(s)
Liked 936 Times in 709 Posts
Originally Posted by david58 View Post
I will often just slip the sleeves back on without zipping them. Then I get more ventilation than if the jacket is full-up.
Thanks, I'll try that.
Carbonfiberboy is online now  
Old 11-30-12, 01:07 PM
  #13  
bikerjp
Beer >> Sanity
 
bikerjp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,449

Bikes: 2014 Evo DA2, 2010 Caad9-4, 2011 Synapse-4, 2013 CaadX-disc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
None. If it's a short shower then I just get wet. It's not like you are not at least somewhat wet from sweat anyway. If it's raining before I go I don't go. In the winter it's snow and a bit of falling snow isn't a problem for most jackets you'd use in the winter. If it's a blizzard I'm staying home.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Commuting or doing LSD is a somewhat different story, because you can usually moderate the effort to control your body temp.
Doing LSD while riding must be a trip.

Last edited by bikerjp; 11-30-12 at 01:15 PM.
bikerjp is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 01:35 PM
  #14  
Diegomayra
Too Fat for This Sport
 
Diegomayra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 698

Bikes: 2011 Cannondale Supersix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Very good discussion. I have just finished perfecting my cold gear setup,'and now I am debating rain riding.
I have been caught in heavy downpours for brief periods, it definitely is a totally different riding style, where saftey is mmore of a factor than speed.

Is riding in the rain worth it? I'm not advocating having no rain gear at all, rather just interested if it's worth the maintenance required post ride?
Diegomayra is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 01:52 PM
  #15  
bigfred 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NZ
Posts: 3,841

Bikes: More than 1, but, less than S-1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
As has already been pointed out, the only way you'll stay dry in even the most waterproof of jackets is if you moderate your effort to minimize sweating.

I just get used to the idea that I will get wet and subscribe to the windproof but well ventillated approach. My two basic rain layers are a windproof vest with ample rear venting for stuffing into a jersey pocket as a just in case or in the event of fairly light showers. For more continuous or heavy rain I use a PI Aero jacket. It's reasonably waterresistant, tight fitting and only have venting at the arm pits.
__________________
Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.
bigfred is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 03:12 PM
  #16  
Gordy748
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Diegomayra View Post
Is riding in the rain worth it? I'm not advocating having no rain gear at all, rather just interested if it's worth the maintenance required post ride?
If you live in the Pacific Northwest, then if you think it's not worth riding in the rain you will not be riding at all for 7 months of the year.

My current rain outfit is Rapha Belgian hat, Rapha rain jacket, Assos rain gloves, Gore tights and Rapha neoprene overshoes. I also only use wool undershirts and socks, on the understanding I will get damp or wet somehow but that at least wool retains heat.

I've heard that the Assos rain jacket is simply the best rain jacket you can buy. The price is steep, steep, steep, though.
Gordy748 is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 03:33 PM
  #17  
CenturionIM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,049
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
What you want requires a fair amount of technology and there are very few decent candidates -- none of which are cheap.
Who are the few decent candidates that you speak of?
CenturionIM is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 03:55 PM
  #18  
Sean T
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 95

Bikes: Giant TCR

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bigbadwullf View Post
Cheap disposable poncho. Just something to wait out a shower. If it's raining I'm not riding.
I love these sorts of non answers.
so helpful
Sean T is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 04:14 PM
  #19  
banerjek
Portland Fred
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,548

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by theEconomist View Post
Who are the few decent candidates that you speak of?
I think the GoreTex Active stuff is light enough for cycling -- one of my go to jackets is the Gore Oxygen GT AS. Disclaimer: I'm a product tester for which I receive consideration, so you may want to take my words with a grain of salt. There's another jacket that's lighter and better still, but it's not available yet. Before the Active line (also marketed as Active Shell) came out, I took the position that nothing was light enough and that you were better off getting wet. I've owned jackets throughout the Gore-Tex line for years. I have never found any PacLite, Performance Shell, or Pro Shell jackets that I'd recommend for cycling.

Waterproof/breathable jackets are not magic. If you'd sweat in a windbreaker when it's dry, you'll sweat in one of these things regardless of the weather. So you can't hammer and stay dry at 55F even if it would work fine at a lollygagging pace.

So in a classic BF sense, whether one of these would work for you depends on how, where, and under what conditions you ride.
banerjek is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 04:18 PM
  #20  
maidenfan
Senior Member
 
maidenfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland, Or
Posts: 570
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I've spent the last two years trying to figure out how to stay dry and it just didnt work for me - I always ended up wet on the inside. When I started trying to figure out how to stay warm and comfortable things started happening. So far, for me, light wool baselayers and an unzipped showers pass elite jacket have worked well in the 30-40's range. If it gets real cold or real wet I'll zip the jacket up and/or add another baselayer or use a thicker one. I use wool bibs for bottoms and add a goretex layer when its really wet.
maidenfan is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 05:41 PM
  #21  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,650

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3020 Post(s)
Liked 936 Times in 709 Posts
Originally Posted by Diegomayra View Post
Very good discussion. I have just finished perfecting my cold gear setup,'and now I am debating rain riding.
I have been caught in heavy downpours for brief periods, it definitely is a totally different riding style, where saftey is mmore of a factor than speed.

Is riding in the rain worth it? I'm not advocating having no rain gear at all, rather just interested if it's worth the maintenance required post ride?
Depends on the frequency of rain in your area. In the PNW there are only two kinds of riders: the wet and the weak.

My practice is to do one long hard ride a week, regardless of wetness, and do the rest indoors or at the gym. Like you say, one spends too much time maintaining and too little riding. But riding outside in the rain is totally worth it. First of all, it's really fun. Secondly, you're going to get wet if you ride seriously, so you might as well get some practice at it. I never have a ride that was bad because of weather. They're all good rides.
Carbonfiberboy is online now  
Old 11-30-12, 06:04 PM
  #22  
banerjek
Portland Fred
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,548

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 33 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
But riding outside in the rain is totally worth it. First of all, it's really fun. Secondly, you're going to get wet if you ride seriously, so you might as well get some practice at it. I never have a ride that was bad because of weather. They're all good rides.
Correct.

People don't whine about getting wet when they take a shower, so what's the big deal about adding a bicycle to the equation? When you're riding, you barely notice you're wet. The only reasons to even bother to stay dry is that you want to be able to get away with less gear or commuters might like the possibility of not having to change.
banerjek is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 06:46 PM
  #23  
david58
Senior Member
 
david58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Posts: 1,846

Bikes: Fuji Cross Comp, BMC SR02, Surly Krampas

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
I think the GoreTex Active stuff is light enough for cycling -- one of my go to jackets is the Gore Oxygen GT AS. Disclaimer: I'm a product tester for which I receive consideration, so you may want to take my words with a grain of salt. There's another jacket that's lighter and better still, but it's not available yet. Before the Active line (also marketed as Active Shell) came out, I took the position that nothing was light enough and that you were better off getting wet. I've owned jackets throughout the Gore-Tex line for years. I have never found any PacLite, Performance Shell, or Pro Shell jackets that I'd recommend for cycling.

Waterproof/breathable jackets are not magic. If you'd sweat in a windbreaker when it's dry, you'll sweat in one of these things regardless of the weather. So you can't hammer and stay dry at 55F even if it would work fine at a lollygagging pace.

So in a classic BF sense, whether one of these would work for you depends on how, where, and under what conditions you ride.
[Tongue firmly in cheek...] But you guys with 0.03% body fat can have the gore-tex type garments appear to work - I think you sweat less than those of us that have an adipose base layer....
david58 is offline  
Old 11-30-12, 11:24 PM
  #24  
bikerjp
Beer >> Sanity
 
bikerjp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,449

Bikes: 2014 Evo DA2, 2010 Caad9-4, 2011 Synapse-4, 2013 CaadX-disc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
But riding outside in the rain is totally worth it. First of all, it's really fun. Secondly, you're going to get wet if you ride seriously, so you might as well get some practice at it. I never have a ride that was bad because of weather. They're all good rides.
Fun is a matter of perspective. I don't mind, in fact I thoroughly enjoy, riding or otherwise being out in friggin' cold weather. I don't mind getting wet on ride when it's a short shower or something but I hate the road grim that gets all over me and the bike. Thought I had ruined a new jersey once when I got home with road spray all over the back. Long soak, stain remover and a good wash saved it.
bikerjp is offline  
Old 12-01-12, 12:16 AM
  #25  
david58
Senior Member
 
david58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Posts: 1,846

Bikes: Fuji Cross Comp, BMC SR02, Surly Krampas

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Depends on the frequency of rain in your area. In the PNW there are only two kinds of riders: the wet and the weak.

My practice is to do one long hard ride a week, regardless of wetness, and do the rest indoors or at the gym. Like you say, one spends too much time maintaining and too little riding. But riding outside in the rain is totally worth it. First of all, it's really fun. Secondly, you're going to get wet if you ride seriously, so you might as well get some practice at it. I never have a ride that was bad because of weather. They're all good rides.
+1 !!!
david58 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.