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MTB bike shoes with 3 hole system?

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MTB bike shoes with 3 hole system?

Old 12-29-12, 03:30 PM
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UK_Cyclist
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MTB bike shoes with 3 hole system?

Does anyone know of any mountain bike shoes which use a three hole system for attaching cleats?

I cycle a road-bike however I am adverse to purchasing road-shoes because of their uncomfortable off-bike use (walking).

I would like to purchase a pair of recessed cleat shoes with treaded soles and therefore an improved ease of movement off the bike, which are compatible with road pedals.

Thank you very much for any suggestions/thoughts.
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Old 12-29-12, 03:47 PM
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why not just buy some MTB SPD pedals or something like that to put on your roadie? I've never used them on a roadie, but they seem like they would work.
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Old 12-29-12, 03:58 PM
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What your asking for doesn't exist, and really isn't even possible. The 3 bolt (i.e. Look, Keo, Shimano SPD-SL etc) cleat takes up so much of the front of the sole of the shoe, that there won't be any space for tread; even if you did fit some tread in, it would interfere with the cleat / pedal interface.

Nothing wrong with using MTB shoes & cleats for road cycling, you can get carbon sole shoes, and although they aren't quite as stiff as a road one, but will be far more comfortable for walking in; and MTB clipless pedals are fine for riding distance in.

What you really need to do, is decide if you want to be able to walk when on the road bike or not. Road shoes really aren't meant for walking in, you can get cleat covers, which are good for very short distance, but you want to be planning you rides so you don't need to walk very far. If your rides involve a lot of walking, you want to be going for the MTB pedal / shoe setup.
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Old 12-29-12, 07:30 PM
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There are no MTB shoes with the 3 hole system that I can think of at the moment, but there are road shoe with both the 3 and 2 hole system. How long do you walk in cycling shoes? The only time I walk in mine is when I go number 1/2.

Also, MTB shoes use the 2 hole cleat because it sheds dirt a lot better than the 3 hole system. Just get MTB pedals.
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Old 12-29-12, 08:09 PM
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Look for 'touring' pedals. They take the recessed cleat but the pedals will have a wider platform.

An example is the Shimano PD-A600 pedal:
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Old 12-30-12, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by canam73 View Post
Look for 'touring' pedals.
@canam73. Hi, thank you for your suggestion! What are "touring" pedals? What are they designed for? Are they a mix of MTB and road pedals?

Last edited by UK_Cyclist; 12-30-12 at 07:50 AM.
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Old 12-30-12, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by GT4 View Post
How long do you walk in cycling shoes?
@GT4. I'm not required to walk a certain distance because of a particular route I chose... It's just that I don't wish to be caught-out if I become absolutely drained and have to dismount and walk a bit.
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Old 12-30-12, 07:55 AM
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@jimc101. Hi. Thank you very much for your reply. Very helpful of you to leave such a full reply.
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Old 12-30-12, 08:06 AM
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I use SPDs on my road bikes as well as my hybrid and cross bikes. I like the recessed cleats as I use the same shoes for commuting, and I like to be able to walk into the office, bar etc with my biking shoes. I've got three Shimano SPD pedal setups: A520 (similar to the A600 above), A530 (platform on one side) and M520 (dual-sided). I log thousands of miles on the SPDs every year, and they work great for me.
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Old 12-30-12, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by UK_Cyclist View Post
@canam73. Hi, thank you for your suggestion! What are "touring" pedals? What are they designed for? Are they a mix of MTB and road pedals?
Essentially, yes. They are designed for bicycle touring, which usually means road riding but with more occasions to get off and walk in your shoes. In addition to the shimano models hsh101 pointed out, there is also the Crank Brothers Candy. And if you can order from Nashbar, they have their own versions of the shimano pedals that are a little cheaper.
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Old 12-30-12, 09:38 AM
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The pedals I eventually purchase will be the first set of clipless pedals I have ever used/owned.
I've done some searching on the internet and found these best prices:

Wellgo WPD 823, http://www.cyclesportsuk.co.uk/produ...oducts_id=8077
£19/US $30
Shimano M530 SPD Trail pedal, http://www.merlincycles.com/bike-sho...pd-pedals.html
£21/US $35
Shimano A520 SPD Touring, http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...=UnitedKingdom
£25/US $40

And these ones are more pricey, but would they be worth it?
Shimano A600 SPD Touring, http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/...edals___silver
£50/US $80

Considering they'll be my first set of clipless pedals, which would you recommend considering their quality but also price?
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Old 12-30-12, 10:00 AM
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Look made the shoe you are asking about back in the early 90's, but SPD style pedals eliminated the need for shoes like this.
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Old 12-30-12, 11:54 AM
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Between Wellgo and Shimano, would go for Shimano, as cleats are easier to get hold of, the other key players in the UK market are Crank Brothers and Time, Most UK bike shops will carry at least one of these 3 brands; the only pedal type to avoid at present is Look Quartz, this has been replaced by a new & much improved model, which isn't on the market yet.

For which to get, how shiny do you want, or what matches the color scheme on your bike, all 4 sellers you have linked to are good, if you use Merlin or CRC, go via cashback sites for some extra cashback on your purchase.
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Old 12-30-12, 01:33 PM
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Jimc101 has some good advice for you. Also, think about whether you want one-sided or multi-sided pedals. If I recall correctly, Shimano "A" are all one-sided, whilst "M" are dual-sided. At this point, I like my M520's the best, as I don't have to worry about making sure the pedal is right-side up when I go to click into them. But, the single-sided touring ones can also be advantageous, if you expect to ride without cleats.

As for A520 vs A600, I thought the two primary differences betwen them were weight and profile. Neither was worth it to me for the cost difference, so I went with the 520's.
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Old 12-30-12, 01:48 PM
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I see plenty of people (some really fast!) with MTB pedals on road bikes. Don't get hung up on the MTB name. The Shimano M520s are dirt cheap and double sided. You can get stylish looking leather shoes that mount SPD cleats. I've seen posts where people say single sided MTB pedals are a bit difficult because the side with the clip is always on the bottom side. The advantage of road pedals is weight savings, but, like other bike gear, lower weight comes with a higher price tag.
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Old 12-30-12, 02:30 PM
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The A600 is essentially the A520 with lighter materials. It's only important if you're counting grams. Unless you're racing A520 is good for most purposes. Really the selection of your shoe will probably be more important than the choice of pedal or cleat interface.
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Old 12-30-12, 05:43 PM
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@a1penguin, @hsh101 and @Anyone else(!), Between the Shimano M520 & Shimano M530, does either pedal have any benefit for road cycling? What are the major differences? Any recommendation for either pedal?

(I've linked URL photos for each).
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Old 12-30-12, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by UK_Cyclist View Post
@a1penguin, @hsh101 and @Anyone else(!), Between the Shimano M520 & Shimano M530, does either pedal have any benefit for road cycling? What are the major differences? Any recommendation for either pedal?

(I've linked URL photos for each).
My thoughts... the M530 gives you a larger contact area, which could be helpful if either you plan to ride without cleats at all, or if your shoes aren't too firm and you need the support. The M520 is closer to a true road bike pedal, while still being SPD. I lean towards the M520 for my road bikes as I don't expect to need the larger contact area. That being said, both are good choices IMHO.
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Old 12-30-12, 06:46 PM
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another 'mtb' type option would be any variation of the crank bros eggbeaters. I use either eggbeaters or the Candy version (has small platform) on all my road bikes. I have both mtb and road shoes (use the quattro cleat for eggbeaters on the 3 hole road shoes). Have never had unwarrented release, find them easy to get in and out, and the 'float' is a comfortable level without sacrificing hold-in.
As for shoes, I've found that equivalent mtb shoes to road shoes are equally 'stiff'. You pay $250+ and you'll get a stiff road or mtb shoe. However, because mtb shoes are also designed to be 'run' on by riders, through rock and other obstacles, they are of much studier construction. For that, they weigh significantly more - I've found them to be as much as a lb heavier than an equivalent road shoe (per pr., without cleats).
I use the mtb shoes for general riding and my 'under the week' training rides. But when the pace freshens, like the weekend hammerfests, I pull out the road shoes, cause I need all the help I can get.
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Old 12-31-12, 03:24 AM
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I have M520s on my road bike. They have the double-sided feature and thus eliminate the worry of having the right side up. In fact, they even come with plastic inserts, allowing the M520s to have a flat side if you happen to ride without your cleats/shoes. I've never used them, so I don't know how comfortable they would be for longer rides. Additionally, Shimano also offers a multidirectional release cleat, which I found useful as a first-time clipless pedal user because you need not release only in one direction/angle. As to the shoes, I can walk in them and find them useful as others have suggested (stopping somewhere to eat, bar, walk the bike, etc.) and are sufficiently stiff--no hot foot or other problems. HTH
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Old 12-31-12, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by superfred View Post
. Really the selection of your shoe will probably be more important than the choice of pedal or cleat interface.
Good advice , find shoes that give you plenty of room and have a firm(hard) sole . I use M520's also, with shoes that have a carbon-graphite sole , and I really love the set-up. Good luck to you.
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Old 12-31-12, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by elboGreaze View Post
find shoes that give you plenty of room and have a firm(hard) sole . I use M520's also, with shoes that have a carbon-graphite sole , and I really love the set-up. Good luck to you.
Hi! @elboGreaze, Thanks for your wishes. Out of interest which cycling shoes do you wear?
And also, when you said "shoes that give you plenty of room", What did you mean exactly? Are you talking about how usually when one does exercise, his/her feet will swell a little? And so you need shoes that will accommodate this change?
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Old 12-31-12, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by das Ben Gator View Post
As to the shoes, I can walk in them and find them useful as others have suggested (stopping somewhere to eat, bar, walk the bike, etc.) and are sufficiently stiff--no hot foot or other problems. HTH
@das Ben Gator, Hi! Thank you for your reply I appreciate it a lot. May I ask which cycling shoes you wear? You see, I'm trying to decide on which pair to purchase.

Last edited by UK_Cyclist; 12-31-12 at 07:28 AM.
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Old 12-31-12, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by hsh101 View Post
the M530 gives you a larger contact area, which could be helpful if either you plan to ride without cleats at all, or if your shoes aren't too firm and you need the support. The M520 is closer to a true road bike pedal, while still being SPD. I lean towards the M520 for my road bikes as I don't expect to need the larger contact area.
@hsh101, Hi again. I was under the impression that pedals with a larger contact area would be closer in design/form to a true road-bike pedal? (And hence, therefore the M530s). I assumed that because, when I looked at road-specific pedals, they appear to be larger is size. Is that incorrect?
What is the advantage of a larger contact area? Cheers pal again!
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Old 12-31-12, 08:41 AM
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IMO, you don't want them too snug from the get-go . Been using these for two years now , no issues .
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