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Still riding DT shifters? -- new bike thoughts

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Still riding DT shifters? -- new bike thoughts

Old 02-13-05, 09:17 AM
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fixie.ninja
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Still riding DT shifters? -- new bike thoughts

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Last edited by fixie.ninja; 10-31-07 at 03:50 AM.
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Old 02-13-05, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by fixie.ninja

Does anyone else turn away from the trend of buying the newest and 'best' at every turn, in lieu of what's comfortable and familiar (and affordable)?
Yeah, I got lots of older stuff,with downtube and barend shifters and 7 and 8 speeds. Doesn't cost a fortune and it can be found reasonably cheap for what use to to considered top shelf stuff. There are plenty of decent frames to be had on ebay,and ww.gvhbikes.com has some new stuff that is reasonable.....I tried alot of aluminum and it just didn't work for me.
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Old 02-13-05, 09:42 AM
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It's the aluminium. Just hate that not the newer technology. I'm outfitting my steel bianchi with my number one biggest want: STI. That means my downtube stuff has to go. Of course then I realized it'd be much cheaper if I just stayed with DT than trying to upgrade to STI.
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Old 02-13-05, 09:48 AM
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After riding a steel Miele I bought used in 1992 I recently purchased a new AL/STI bike. It's a Fuji Roubaix and I like it a lot. It handles better & is a little lighter. When I bought it I assumed I'd only ride the old Miele when it was raining or the Fuji was in the shop. I couldn't bear to get rid of the Miele for sentimental reasons (rode a bunch of Triathlons in my 20's and lost 30 lb on it in my 30's), but I find I still ride it about once a week for reasons that go beyond sentimentality. The old Miele has seen better days but it's still a lot of fun to ride when you just want to cruise along and enjoy the ride. Frankly I also like it from a styling standpoint. It just looks like an old school road bike and I like that. Later this year I'm going to either paint & rebuild my Miele and make it my Sunday driver or paint it & convert it to a fixie for the training benifit.

Good luck in your quest for a new bike (or a new old bike)!
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Old 02-13-05, 10:41 AM
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What's "skitchy"? Halfway between skittish and sketchy? If that's the case, I wonder if you are not complaining about historical differences (are there some?) between trail figures, or alleged (have doubts about this) increased response to lateral CG changes due to frame stiffness.

The integrated brake/shift levers are a great advance, and so are indexed shift levers, whether downtube or bar-end, as long as you don't mind paying for them.

I would whole-heartedly grab something new, even if it meant that I bought lower down in the pecking order. It could be that 8-speed Sora STI on an aluminum frame is now better than old 7-speed friction Dura-Ace. Anybody want to defend the merits of LP vinyl or 8-track versus CD or solid state?

I have been through all the steps, from 1982 to the present. I stuck with 7-speed long enough to go straight to 9-speed STI, but other than that I did them all, including using 8-speed Athena shifters with my 7-speed rear end. I will be sticking with 9-speed STI for a while longer.

You should do what is right for you and the way you use your bikes. I need a bike that tracks straight through a turn, laid over elbow to elbow with other bikes, even if I shift. STI is helpful for that application. I have heard that bar-end shifters work sufficiently well also.

I usually get flamed on a post like this (for one thing the steelies come after me), and a lot isn't worse than a little, and I wish to point out that for a very long time Campy did not shift as well as a lot of Japanese derailleurs. That's because the Japanese (Suntour?) invented and patented the single-pivot-slant-parallelogram derailleur, and Campagnolo refused to license the technology. Instead they just waited until the patent expired before they copied it. So the NR / SR / et. al, derailleurs never shifted as well as the Japanese derailleurs, because the distance of the upper jockey pulley from the cog teeth varied from cog to cog, and chain shifting is in part a function of the aggregate deflection of the chain through that distance. The Italian drivetrains tended to skip and chatter a lot, compared to Japanese drivetrains of the same period.

Yes, a lot of prestige and collectibility attaches to owning and riding a classic Italian bike with period Campy parts, but they didn't work well when they were new, and they don't work well now. No cachet at all attaches to low-end old Japanese parts, though.
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Old 02-13-05, 12:11 PM
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What about carbon or titanium?
It'll certainly be neat to see a carbon frame with bar end shifters or maybe even clamp a contraption with DT shifters.
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Old 02-13-05, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by SDS
I usually get flamed on a post like this (for one thing the steelies come after me), and a lot isn't worse than a little, and I wish to point out that for a very long time Campy did not shift as well as a lot of Japanese derailleurs. That's because the Japanese (Suntour?) invented and patented the single-pivot-slant-parallelogram derailleur, and Campagnolo refused to license the technology. Instead they just waited until the patent expired before they copied it. So the NR / SR / et. al, derailleurs never shifted as well as the Japanese derailleurs, because the distance of the upper jockey pulley from the cog teeth varied from cog to cog, and chain shifting is in part a function of the aggregate deflection of the chain through that distance. The Italian drivetrains tended to skip and chatter a lot, compared to Japanese drivetrains of the same period.

Yes, a lot of prestige and collectibility attaches to owning and riding a classic Italian bike with period Campy parts, but they didn't work well when they were new, and they don't work well now. No cachet at all attaches to low-end old Japanese parts, though.
Actually that's very interesting, thanks for that.
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Old 02-13-05, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by SDS

Yes, a lot of prestige and collectibility attaches to owning and riding a classic Italian bike with period Campy parts, but they didn't work well when they were new, and they don't work well now. No cachet at all attaches to low-end old Japanese parts, though.
Italian frmes function perfectly with oriental parts on them. BTW, what is 'cachet'? Special bling or some kind of poseur' garb?
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Old 02-13-05, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by slvoid
What about carbon or titanium?
It'll certainly be neat to see a carbon frame with bar end shifters or maybe even clamp a contraption with DT shifters.
I built a recent Trek 5200 OCLV with dountube shifters. Talk about freaking the bike geeks and snobs out!
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Old 02-13-05, 12:54 PM
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From the American Heritage Dictionary Online:

Cachet: 1. A mark or quality, as of distinction, individuality, or authenticity: “Federal courts have a certain cachet which state courts lack”

I will try harder to write down to the appropriate level.
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