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The death of non carbon rim....Carbon is the New King of Wheels

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The death of non carbon rim....Carbon is the New King of Wheels

Old 04-11-13, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
Well, the other unasked question is what happens to those wheels Cancellara rode on after he's done? Does he use them again for the next race or do they get sold on ebay?

Durability for one day is nice but I would need several years and thousands of miles before I would be able to rationalize them. In other words, just because a racer races on something doesn't make it appropriate for Joe Tyro.
Valid point, though I doubt you will be riding every day on cobbled roads. I would assume that completing the course of Paris-Roubaix would be equivalent to the bumps most of us face after several years of riding.

I do not think this moment crowns carbon wheels king, they have been king for quite some time. This is complete consolidation by carbon. Not only is carbon strong, durable, and light, it also looks good. That imo is the main reason it is advancing so much on the amateur market. It looks awesome.
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Old 04-11-13, 02:21 PM
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I think that once there is a major peloton crash and all the carbon fiber wheeled bikes spontaneously combust and flaming drug filled cyclists run into the crowd, that cycling will return to its roots and we will see steel bikes with alloy rims again.
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Old 04-11-13, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi
I think that they'll also need to put to rest any doubts about heat dissipation.
I see a future with carbon wheels and small disk brakes on road bikes. To me this is the fusion that might permeate the high end road bike market.
There will be alloy wheels for years to come at the lower end of the market.
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Old 04-11-13, 02:57 PM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
Well, the other unasked question is what happens to those wheels Cancellara rode on after he's done? Does he use them again for the next race or do they get sold on ebay?

Durability for one day is nice but I would need several years and thousands of miles before I would be able to rationalize them. In other words, just because a racer races on something doesn't make it appropriate for Joe Tyro.
You make a good point. Last weekend I watched a race in Pitt Meadows BC where 50% of the ride was dirt/sand/mud and the rest was pavement. It was raining hard during the whole 120 kms. At the transition from dirt to pavement they had to slow.... the sound of brake grinding was amazing. The pro riders were on carbon wheels. Did they relegate those wheels to strictly training after this race?
How much did that one race cost the sponsors ?
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Old 04-11-13, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by bonz50
and as we've seen, discs are indeed coming eventually.
It depends on what you mean by eventually. They have talked about them on road bikes for years. So far the only major manufacturer is Colnago and their sales haven't been a huge success.
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Old 04-11-13, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by hyhuu
Well pros haven't ridden Al frames for a long time so obviously Al frames must be dead as well.
Steel too. Steel is dead. Can't find none anywhere.
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Old 04-11-13, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Inertianinja
thats only an issue if "all" aluminum wheels can withstand P-R. which is obviously not the case

Less material will always mean less strength.
Only until I am able to perfect my formula for unobtainium!
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Old 04-11-13, 04:25 PM
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I cant see a real problem with heat build up, a number of race cars use carbon brakes. Cross bike can be had with disc and I think steel frames still. I know road/racing bikez are different, but you offer a light disc and aero caliper, you might be making money. Hell carbon disc and a sticky brake pad.
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Old 04-11-13, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody
I cant see a real problem with heat build up, a number of race cars use carbon brakes.
Uh, that's a little different...
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Old 04-11-13, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life
I see a future with carbon wheels and small disk brakes on road bikes. To me this is the fusion that might permeate the high end road bike market.
There will be alloy wheels for years to come at the lower end of the market.
Maybe... but what's the point of improving aerodynamics with carbon rims only to go backwards with the addition of a disk brake? Not to mention the weight issue. And all those trippy low spoke count radial front wheels go away when you go to a disk brake system.

The problem with carbon is cost. You'll have hard time matching a hand layup and bake system to an automatic die extrusion machine cost-wise.
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Old 04-11-13, 06:29 PM
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Yes they can survive a A Paris Roubaix. But I'm sure those wheels like the Aluminum ones before will not be raced on again, used solely for training rides if that. If you want strictly a racing wheel Yes Carbon is king. For a training wheel of day after day beatings, I'll stick with aluminum for now.
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Old 04-11-13, 06:40 PM
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anyone here ride their road bikes on horrendous cobblestone, or do you guys ride on paved roads?
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Old 04-11-13, 06:53 PM
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My Al rims have seen many kilometers of farm track cobbles: French and Flemish. No complaints.
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Old 04-11-13, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by abstractform20
anyone here ride their road bikes on horrendous cobblestone, or do you guys ride on paved roads?
Roads around here are a mosaic of patch jobs, missing layer of asphalt and pot holes you don't ride over. I wouldn't say there as rough as cobblestone in general but they do beat up you and your wheels up. I've had to ride home on a cracked rim, not sure I would want to if it where carbon.
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Old 04-11-13, 07:16 PM
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^^^ Utter and complete nonsense. Never could quite figure out why folks are okay with CF frames, forks, stems, handlebars ,seatposts, crank arms etc but CF wheels are too fragile / can't take every day use. I have a set of Enve XC wheels on my MTB 29er that I train and race on that have seen far more abuse then any road wheel would ever encounter and they have proven to be trouble free, extremely durable and lighter and stiffer than Al. When I bought Enve 45s for my road rig a couple of year ago I was assurred by Rich @ Wheelbuilder that I would have no problems using them as a every day training wheel and that they could take any abuse I could dish out. Turns out Rich knows what he is talking about. As the price of CF continues to come down and wheelbuilders like Boyd and Williams offer relatively inexpensive wheel options CF will continue to penetrate and gain share in the mainstream market.

Originally Posted by clausen
Yes they can survive a A Paris Roubaix. But I'm sure those wheels like the Aluminum ones before will not be raced on again, used solely for training rides if that. If you want strictly a racing wheel Yes Carbon is king. For a training wheel of day after day beatings, I'll stick with aluminum for now.
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Old 04-11-13, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Grambo
^^^ Utter and complete nonsense. Never could quite figure out why folks are okay with CF frames, forks, stems, handlebars ,seatposts, crank arms etc but CF wheels are too fragile / can't take every day use.
This be BF, several of these posters are not cool with CF any of the above.
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Old 04-12-13, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff
Maybe... but what's the point of improving aerodynamics with carbon rims only to go backwards with the addition of a disk brake? Not to mention the weight issue. And all those trippy low spoke count radial front wheels go away when you go to a disk brake system.

The problem with carbon is cost. You'll have hard time matching a hand layup and bake system to an automatic die extrusion machine cost-wise.
Replacing your worn-out rims goes away with disc brakes, too. Recreational riders don't care much about aerodynamics, and there are more recreational cyclists than wannabe racers.
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Old 04-12-13, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Arabesque
Aluminum is dead?

Maybe in the Tour, where everything is sponsored or use is free.

Not for us paying out of pocket.
Yeah, I wont be replacing any of my AL wheels with CF at current prices...
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Old 04-12-13, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest
I just bought a set of Fulcrum Racing 7s for $193 a few weeks ago. Want to guess what the rims are made of? It ain't carbon.
I thought you moved on to tubular wheels?? What made you go back to Alum clinchers.? I'm curious as to thoughts on how they compared to each other.

Last edited by Afdica; 04-12-13 at 11:04 AM.
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Old 04-12-13, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest
Replacing your worn-out rims goes away with disc brakes, too. Recreational riders don't care much about aerodynamics, and there are more recreational cyclists than wannabe racers.
Yeah but worn-our rims are generally limited to riders like high mileage commuters. This thread is about racers, riders who enjoy performance and going faster, and those that benefit of carbon and aero wheels.
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Old 04-12-13, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by StanSeven
Yeah but worn-our rims are generally limited to riders like high mileage commuters. This thread is about racers, riders who enjoy performance and going faster, and those that benefit of carbon and aero wheels.
All the racers I know go through 1-2 rims per season.
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Old 04-12-13, 11:14 AM
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I race and I've never done that. I usually get tired on my wheels well before that. I've got Zipp 303's with maybe 15,000 miles and quite a few races and the wheels still look great.
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Old 04-12-13, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Afdica
I thought you moved on to tubular wheels?? What made you go back to Alum clinchers.? I'm curious as to thoughts on how they compared to each other.
I did. But I went back. Flats are really, really expensive with tubulars.

I still prefer the way they feel when I go through a tight corner at high speed (coming down hill). It's really hard to describe, but I feel more confident that they're gripping the road and in a good way, and won't crash me, versus clinchers. It isn't a huge difference but it was one I appreciated. The lighter weight is nice, too.

But ... the same tire for clincher vs tubular is $75 vs $120 at LBS, or $35 online and I can mount it myself vs I'm not sure what and even if I bought it at the bike shop they charged me to glue it. I work in software, which means knowing that somebody qualified and mechanically inclined did the mechanical work brings me a lot of comfort when I'm coming down the mountain - I refused to glue them myself. Anyway, a tubular flat generally means replacing the tire and having a new one glued. (I tried Cafe Latex on a flat once, no dice. Got a flat after driving two and a half hours to Mount Rainier to climb up to Paradise, couldn't fix it, had to turn back.)

Three or four flats convinced me that tubulars aren't worth the minor but appreciable benefits.
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Old 04-12-13, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by StanSeven
Yeah but worn-our rims are generally limited to riders like high mileage commuters. This thread is about racers, riders who enjoy performance and going faster, and those that benefit of carbon and aero wheels.
Perhaps someone took a wrong turn while looking for the racing forum. It's a common mistake.
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Old 04-12-13, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Arabesque
Aluminum is dead?

Maybe in the Tour, where everything is sponsored or use is free.

Not for us paying out of pocket.
+1
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