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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Need help choosing tires!

Old 04-24-13, 09:22 PM
  #1  
BostonGreg
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Need help choosing tires!

Just purchased my first road bike, Domane 5.2 and picked up a pair of 2012 SHIMANO DURA-ACE 7900 C50 CLINCHER WHEELS CARBON WHEELSET

I need to know if these tires are a perfect fit for the Dura-Ace C50 Carbon wheels (see link for tires I like)...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-VITTORIA-Z...item589ef7aad0

Also, in the Ebay listing for the wheels, it states "Note: Can be used for 10-speed with an additional spacer" What does this mean exactly? Will I need to purchase additional parts just to get these wheels up? Should I look at any better options?

Sorry if these are stupid questions, I'm new to road biking. Used to bike in high school a bit but it's been years. Looking to get some exercise, meet some new friends in local bike clubs and really enjoy my summer with my new hobby riding the bike paths on the Cape Cod Coast

Cheers folks, thanks for any help you can give. If there's a much better option for tires with this high-end setup, I'd love to hear some options. I did spend some money on the bike and wheels and definitely don't want cheap tires. I do like the white look of these Zaffiros though!

Best,
Greg
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Old 04-24-13, 09:24 PM
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Here are the exact rims I bought if this helps...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/171026884251

I'm guessing that all 700c tires will fit and so my real question is what is the difference between:

700c 23

700c 25

700c 28

Are the higher numbers wider tires for an easier ride but not as fast? What size would be best on the Dura-Ace carbon wheels?

Last edited by BostonGreg; 04-24-13 at 09:31 PM.
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Old 04-24-13, 09:35 PM
  #3  
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I could be mistaken but I thought the 7900 wheels were for 8/9/10 speed cassettes. Im assuming the spacer is needed since they had to make the clearance for smaller cassettes.
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Old 04-24-13, 09:38 PM
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That's a pretty low end tire. Most people here will recommend Continental GP4000S for a nice setup like yours.

There are several good tire options available. Conti GP4000S, Michelin Prorace 4, Schwalbe Ultremo, Vittoria Open Corsa are all high end options. But if you're not racing, something like a Vittoria Rubino Pro or Diamante, or a Michelin Lithion 2 might be a good option. Hell, I race and I use Lithion 2 tires.

Last edited by ILUVUK; 04-24-13 at 09:43 PM. Reason: additional info
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Old 04-24-13, 09:39 PM
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if it's great handling and smooth ride, vittoria open corsa evo cx.
for a bit more durability, schwalbe ultremo zx

life is too short to ride on crappy tires
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Old 04-24-13, 09:56 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by BostonGreg View Post
Just purchased my first road bike, Domane 5.2 and picked up a pair of 2012 SHIMANO DURA-ACE 7900 C50 CLINCHER WHEELS CARBON WHEELSET

I need to know if these tires are a perfect fit for the Dura-Ace C50 Carbon wheels (see link for tires I like)...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-VITTORIA-Z...item589ef7aad0

Also, in the Ebay listing for the wheels, it states "Note: Can be used for 10-speed with an additional spacer" What does this mean exactly? Will I need to purchase additional parts just to get these wheels up? Should I look at any better options?

Sorry if these are stupid questions, I'm new to road biking. Used to bike in high school a bit but it's been years. Looking to get some exercise, meet some new friends in local bike clubs and really enjoy my summer with my new hobby riding the bike paths on the Cape Cod Coast

Cheers folks, thanks for any help you can give. If there's a much better option for tires with this high-end setup, I'd love to hear some options. I did spend some money on the bike and wheels and definitely don't want cheap tires. I do like the white look of these Zaffiros though!

Best,
Greg
They're likely referring to the 1mm shim that goes behind all the cogs when you install them on the wheel.
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Old 04-24-13, 10:20 PM
  #7  
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Vittoria Corsa Evo CX tires are great as are the GP4000s. great ride quality but cost more than the Vittoria's you asked about. Personally I prefer a better ride over longevity. Whatt is your budget?
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Old 04-24-13, 11:09 PM
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Cost doesn't matter, I want the best. Glad I didn't get that first pair. Thanks for all the great options guys! Smooth ride, fast tire and sharp looks are most important I suppose. I'll also be riding on some Boston area roads and dont want a tire that's going to go flat on me all the time. I think it's going to be one of these two final options>

Continental Grand Prix 4000s clincher tires ($90 pair)

OR

2013 Vittoria Open Corsa Evo CX III Clincher ISOGRIP ($105 pair)

What is the difference between 23 and 25? Will the larger 25 width give more stable handling? Will both 23 and 25 fit the DURA-ACE c50 carbon wheel?
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Old 04-24-13, 11:18 PM
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GP4000S are the best.
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Old 04-25-13, 12:40 AM
  #10  
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Maybe you should get somebody to pedal your bike for you too. Crikey.
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Old 04-25-13, 01:10 AM
  #11  
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The number is the nominal width of the tire, 23 vs 25 vs 28mm. They'll all work with your wheels; the only issue might be if the 28's will clear your frame. Narrower tires are run at higher pressure (I'd recommend getting a floor pump as well to top off before each ride; 110 psi gets old quickly with a frame pump), and while they roll better any benefit is quickly lost on bad pavement. You'll end up expending energy on bouncing rather than rolling. The choice between 23 or 25 might depend on pavement, wheels, and frame. I'd suggest starting with a quality 23; if that is too harsh, consider a 25. Running at too low of pressure for the tires width will increase rolling resistance and invites pinch flats.

Flats are a given; we all get them. Bring a spare tube or two and a CO2 inflator. However, the frequency of flats is highly variable... If you avoid cracks, holes, the areas around manholes, gutters, and stripes of gravel or other debris you will have a lot less of them. That's because nails, staples, etc collect in holes, cracks and debris. Things that give you flats won't stay around on smooth pavement that sees tire traffic. If you do get a flat, determine where it is and check the tire. This way whatever caused the flat isn't still stuck in the tire to give you another flat immediately with a fresh tube. If you have a suspect area on the tire, turn it inside out and run a nail along it. A pair of tweezers is practical to pull out foreign objects. It's normal to go months without flats then all of a sudden get a bunch, and this might be a cue to replace the tire. If you ride on crappy pavement the tires will get chewed up before they wear down.
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Old 04-25-13, 06:48 AM
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Thanks for the great advice sfrider!
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Old 04-25-13, 07:07 AM
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Also consider Michelin Pro 4's, if you discussing GP4000's and the Vittoria's they should be in the mix. I doubt you'll feel much difference between the upper end clincher brands to begin with anyway, as others have said, get a kit together to deal with your first flat, and practice removing/replacing a tube in your garage first before you need to do it on the road.
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Old 04-25-13, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by BostonGreg View Post
Cost doesn't matter, I want the best. Glad I didn't get that first pair. Thanks for all the great options guys! Smooth ride, fast tire and sharp looks are most important I suppose. I'll also be riding on some Boston area roads and dont want a tire that's going to go flat on me all the time. I think it's going to be one of these two final options>

Continental Grand Prix 4000s clincher tires ($90 pair)

OR

2013 Vittoria Open Corsa Evo CX III Clincher ISOGRIP ($105 pair)

What is the difference between 23 and 25? Will the larger 25 width give more stable handling? Will both 23 and 25 fit the DURA-ACE c50 carbon wheel?

And shop around, you can get GP 4000s tires for a lot less than $90 a pair.
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Old 04-25-13, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Jaymadd View Post
And shop around, you can get GP 4000s tires for a lot less than $90 a pair.
Where ?
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Old 04-25-13, 12:01 PM
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http://www.probikekit.com/bicycle-ty.../10780063.html

$75 for two delivered

Edit: also use this code for another 10% off

BICYCLING10

Last edited by StanSeven; 04-25-13 at 12:05 PM.
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Old 04-25-13, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by StanSeven View Post
Maybe..http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-to-buy!/page6
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Old 04-25-13, 12:47 PM
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One note: in my opinion only, TPI is a highly overrated measure of the actual quality of a tire.

Some people think higher TPI tires "ride more nicely". I can't necessarily tell the difference between lower and higher TPI tires, but A/B testing TPI's effect alone is totally impossible. There are too many other factors at play here to speak definitively.

Some evidence points to SOME higher TPI tires having lower rolling resistance. I don't necessarily buy these tests, though. IMO, compounds and tread make bigger differences. Rolling resistance in general is both really hard to test in the real world and really hard to feel in the real world.

Lower TPI tires generally have higher resistance to cuts as the carcass threads are thicker. This has certainly been my experience.

In general, I think super light, high end, high TPI tires aren't worth it for training / club rides. These tires are far more prone to flatting. IMO, the trade off on durability and cut resistance is too steep for the small (perhaps inperceptable) performance gains on offer. A good quality tire at ~250-300G is perfect for most non-racing applications. IMO, 50-100g in extra tire weight vs. something like the GP4000s (which I've found flats relatively easily) is well worth not flatting.
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