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23C Gator Hardshells -> 28C Grand Prix 4-Seasons?

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23C Gator Hardshells -> 28C Grand Prix 4-Seasons?

Old 01-07-14, 10:10 PM
  #26  
Drew Eckhardt 
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Originally Posted by biciklanto View Post
This is quite the conversation! Clearly what I should do is buy the new Grand Prix 4000 S IIs in 28C, which will save weight over my current 23Cs, drastically improve ride quality and reduce rolling resistance, and hope that they hold together when the road turns rotten.

Or I get the Grand Prix 4-Seasons after all, noting that they have double Vectran breakers and Duraskin for the sidewalls, and take comfort in the fact that they are 330TPI tires instead of the 180 offered by the Gator Hardshells, even if they're not the so-called BlackChili compound.
I think the GP 4 Season is an answer in search of a question. They don't ride as nice as the GP4000 S, don't have the long tread life of a Gatorskin, and don't ride appreciably better than a Gatorskin.

While they have measurably better wet traction the other tires are usually fine and none are going to save you if you get silly with leaves, painted lines, or manhole covers.

I'd try a GP4000 S II or GP4000 S 25mm wide if you can't wait

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 01-08-14 at 11:13 AM.
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Old 01-08-14, 05:51 AM
  #27  
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Well, found some new data this morning courtesy of a Slowtwitch post on the new GP 4000 S II — complete with graphs, because who doesn't like graphs?

Slowtwitch: Continental GP 4000 S II (with credit to Greg Kopecky)


Perhaps the most telling bit of interest to me is this graph right here of rolling resistance for various sizes of Grand Prix 4000 S II:


Clearly Continental is on the bandwagon when it comes to wider tires equaling lower rolling resistance, with 120 PSI at 23C being roughly equal to the rolling resistance of a 28C tire at about 85PSI.

Maybe this means I've found my tire.
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Old 11-30-20, 03:26 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by biciklanto View Post
I'm getting ready to replace tires on my all-rounder, a CAAD7, and I'm contemplating going for larger tires to try to find a better balance for my riding habits. I put on Continental's Gator Hardshell tires because I despise hate hate getting flats, and to that end I've been really happy with the change, with no flats over the last two years of riding. It seemed like a good move over the Gatorskin because it's the same idea but more.

I ride mostly roads and paved trails here in Germany, though it's not uncommon for me to find myself on groomed dirt and gravel paths through the woods. On these, I've noticed that the narrow width and hard compound of the Hardshells leaves much to be desired. So I'm thinking that if I go to a wider tire that still has anti-puncture properties (in this case, Duraskin and a double Vectran-breaker), while improving both comfort and tracking on non-paved surfaces. I've also read that the GP 4 is a slightly narrower-than-advertised tire, which means that 28mm makes more sense to me than 23mm or 25mm to ensure that I'm actually getting increased width.

Am I on the right track, or are there other recommendations? Given that I'm in Germany, my two options are Schwalbe and Continental, with others like Vittoria being so peripheral that I'm not really interested. I know next to nothing about Schwalbe tires, having always ridden Continental, but if there's a tire there that can balance ride comfort, puncture resistance, and maintain or improve on speed, I'd love to hear about it.
If you don't like flats, get the Hardshell. High rolling resistance vs time changing tyres. AND, it's better to use higher rolling resistance for training, then on race day, use your race tyres.
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Old 11-30-20, 03:31 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
"drastically" might be overstating any differences.

The GP 4 Season does use the BlackChilli compound.
Are you sure? Conti makes no mention of it on their product page.

https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...-prix-4-season
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Old 11-30-20, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
I think the GP 4 Season is an answer in search of a question. They don't ride as nice as the GP4000 S, don't have the long tread life of a Gatorskin, and don't ride appreciably better than a Gatorskin.

While they have measurably better wet traction the other tires are usually fine and none are going to save you if you get silly with leaves, painted lines, or manhole covers.

I'd try a GP4000 S II or GP4000 S 25mm wide if you can't wait
I've ridden both, and the 4 Season is a much nicer and easier rolling tire. It's also very durable, and wears slowly, as well. maybe not as long wearing as the Gators, but still a long life tire. And they are much more supple than the Gators, that, to me, ride like rocks. Hated them.
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Old 11-30-20, 04:49 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
Are you sure? Conti makes no mention of it on their product page.

https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...-prix-4-season
Ummmm,...... this is a SIX year old thread. I suspect the zombie has figured it out by now.

But, in response to "your" question, here's your answer(s):


Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
As sure as the speed with which product lines change now a'days.



In your link there: look to the lower right, in the chart, just to the right of the "TPI". See that little black and yellow box with the picture of a black chilli in it's right hand section? That's THE "Black Chilli" logo. I don't have any GP 4 Season boxes at the moment, but, I'm reasonably sure it was also on the boxes of my last batch of GP 4 Season tires. So, yeh, unless they're old stock or they've changed again, GP 4 Seasons use the black chilli compound. For whatever that's worth.
Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
Oh god. Now you've got me wondering.

They don't have a "big black chilli" below the black chilli icon like they have on the supersonic chart. But, then the GP 4000 lacks the chilli logo on the chart but includes a big version of it in the description.

Hell if I know. Let us know what it says on your box(es). Or, if I get some more before you, I'll do the same.
Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
I know this much: My GP 4 Seasons are sticky.

Maybe not as sticky as the Maxxis Re-fuses I had, but, very comparable to the Michelin Pro Optimums. I can tell a difference between the Pro Optimums and the GP 4 Seasons, but, it's difficult to put it to suppleness are rubber compound, etc.
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Old 11-30-20, 06:36 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
Ummmm,...... this is a SIX year old thread. I suspect the zombie has figured it out by now.

But, in response to "your" question, here's your answer(s):
Damn...

Wasn't paying attention. It floated to the top and I responded. But the 4 Seasons are really good tires.
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