Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

New 2015 Treks -- Discuss

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

New 2015 Treks -- Discuss

Old 05-02-14, 12:32 PM
  #1  
mcmoose
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mcmoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Transplanted to PDX area
Posts: 476

Bikes: Trek FX 7.3 WSD, Trek Lexa SLX, Trek Silque S

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
New 2015 Treks -- Discuss

Trek has unveiled some of its new 2015 road bikes. Included are Domanes (4.0 and 6.9) with disc brakes, and a new line of women's road bikes (Silque --cute, eh?) that look to be replacements for the WSD Domanes (much as the Lexa replaced the AL WSD bikes).

My initial reactions:

Silque -- Love the look (geometry); not crazy about the color scheme (but it might just be that bugly green bar tape). Eager to read reviews of the ride quality. Is this the first "arced top tube" Trek has introduced?

Domane Disc -- As someone planning to move to Portland, got to applaud any disc adoption. Do wonder how much additional weight. And I also have to ask: a Sora group set on a carbon bike... really? What's the reasoning? Can you only accommodate a 9-speed cassette if you have a rear disc (and Sora is it for Shimano 9-speeds)? Somebody help me understand.

I appreciate hearing others' thoughts.
mcmoose is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 12:39 PM
  #2  
Urymoto
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I cant wait to see the discs
Urymoto is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 12:42 PM
  #3  
Dunbar
Senior Member
 
Dunbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 3,079

Bikes: Roubaix SL4 Expert , Cervelo S2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by mcmoose View Post
a Sora group set on a carbon bike... really? What's the reasoning?
They are probably just spec'ing the bike to hit a certain price point. Specialized has the same Sora option on the disc Roubaix. They also offer a $7k Roubaix disc with di2 and hydraulic disc brakes if you want to spend boku bucks.
Dunbar is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 12:43 PM
  #4  
ImChris
Senior Member
 
ImChris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 418

Bikes: Trek Madone, Araya commute

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What's a discussion without photos? I dig the Domane Disc from the looks of it. I'd love to ride one and see how great disk brakes are on the road.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Domane_Disk_Profile.jpg (91.9 KB, 816 views)
ImChris is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 12:44 PM
  #5  
mcmoose
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mcmoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Transplanted to PDX area
Posts: 476

Bikes: Trek FX 7.3 WSD, Trek Lexa SLX, Trek Silque S

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Well, my color issue is solved! The bugly green bar tape is only on the top model (SSL), which I could never afford.

Urymoto, here's the best info I can find on the disc models:
Trek launches Domane Disc Road Bike - now in store at Cycles Galleria!

(Don't know if links to Australian bike shops are allowed, but I can't find the equivalent info elsewhere.)
mcmoose is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 12:47 PM
  #6  
dtrain
L-I-V-I-N
 
dtrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Stafford, OR
Posts: 4,801
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mcmoose View Post
Can you only accommodate a 9-speed cassette if you have a rear disc (and Sora is it for Shimano 9-speeds)?
9 and 10 spacing is the same. 11 requires a touch more room.
__________________
"The older you do get, the more rules they're gonna try to get you to follow. You just gotta keep livin', man, L-I-V-I-N." - Wooderson

'14 carbon Synapse - '12 CAAD 10 5 - '99 Gary Fisher Big Sur
dtrain is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 01:24 PM
  #7  
mcmoose
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mcmoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Transplanted to PDX area
Posts: 476

Bikes: Trek FX 7.3 WSD, Trek Lexa SLX, Trek Silque S

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Thanks, Dunbar and dtrain. Haven't seen any MSRP info for the disc Domanes -- Sora on a Carbon Domane still seems wrong (and I say this as a Sora user).

Chris, you're right... so here's the top-of-the-line Silque, complete with the bar tape I so love:



Sorry for the ugly 2nd image... can't seem to detach it!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Asset_215860.jpg (96.1 KB, 81 views)
File Type: jpg
Asset_215860.jpg (91.5 KB, 165 views)

Last edited by mcmoose; 05-02-14 at 01:27 PM.
mcmoose is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 01:24 PM
  #8  
Nebby10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
12x142 rear dropout spacing for road disc is overkill. I'd be interested in seeing how the chainline works out with it going that wide. It certainly makes it easy to find hubs for the bike though, plenty of MTB hubs for those thru-axel sizing. Bike rumor has details on it, with an interesting note that the recommended max tire size is 25c...I expected more clearance for something with thru-axels and disc brakes.

Domane Disc 4 is $2,099
Domane Disc 6.9 is $7,899.99

Last edited by Nebby10; 05-02-14 at 01:27 PM.
Nebby10 is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 02:14 PM
  #9  
mcmoose
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mcmoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Transplanted to PDX area
Posts: 476

Bikes: Trek FX 7.3 WSD, Trek Lexa SLX, Trek Silque S

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Thanks, Nebby. I noticed in the comments that someone from Cycles Galleria said they had just built up a Domane disc (didn't specify which) and it weighed in at 7.5 kg (~16.5 lbs).
mcmoose is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 02:25 PM
  #10  
Nebby10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mcmoose View Post
Thanks, Nebby. I noticed in the comments that someone from Cycles Galleria said they had just built up a Domane disc (didn't specify which) and it weighed in at 7.5 kg (~16.5 lbs).
They built up the 6.9, it's on their Facebook page. I understand that bike companies like to lead off new bikes with top end components, but to me it seems weird to pair a non-groupset item (the R785) with full DA Di2. I think an Ultegra Di2 setup would've been interesting...possibly in the 4k price range? Also, one of the other sites tested max tire width and said they could just barely fit a 30c tire in the bike, which seems a bit limiting. I guess they're still shooting for mostly a pure road bike/endurance road bike.
Nebby10 is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 02:32 PM
  #11  
roadandmountain
Banned.
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Yeah, there's no way the 4.0 is going to weigh in at 7.5 kg.

I was looking at the 2014 domane 2.0. Seems to be a great value at the price. I do have some reservations about fatigue with built-in frame flex on an aluminum frame.

If I were to go fanboy mode, I would just assume they do extensive fatigue testing ahead of time, but you never know.

Anyone care to speculate about whether this might be an issue for the aluminum domanes down the line?
roadandmountain is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 02:50 PM
  #12  
Nebby10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by roadandmountain View Post
Yeah, there's no way the 4.0 is going to weigh in at 7.5 kg.

I was looking at the 2014 domane 2.0. Seems to be a great value at the price. I do have some reservations about fatigue with built-in frame flex on an aluminum frame.

If I were to go fanboy mode, I would just assume they do extensive fatigue testing ahead of time, but you never know.

Anyone care to speculate about whether this might be an issue for the aluminum domanes down the line?
The flex is reduced a significant amount by the fact that it's got a seatpost rather than a seatpost cap, so I think it should be fine. It's also why the carbon domane feels a fair bit more plush than the alloy version.
Nebby10 is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 03:24 PM
  #13  
roadandmountain
Banned.
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanks nebby.

I will most likely buy a domane 2.

I've seen just about every type of suspension design come and go over the past 25 years and so I'm naturally a bit skeptical. There hasn't been a single suspension design of any kind which has been widely adopted by road bikes, so that's another reason for a bit of caution also.

I just don't want to see the domane become exposed as another 'y bike' although based upon reviews from the first 2 seasons, that's unlikely to be the case.
roadandmountain is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 04:39 PM
  #14  
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,388
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 504 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by mcmoose View Post
And I also have to ask: a Sora group set on a carbon bike... really? What's the reasoning? Can you only accommodate a 9-speed cassette if you have a rear disc (and Sora is it for Shimano 9-speeds)? Somebody help me understand.

I appreciate hearing others' thoughts.
I own 2 bikes - one has Sora from somewhere around 2010, the other has Dura-Ace from somewhere around 2009. At the end of a ride - I cannot tell you which component group I was riding. I just forget about it. There's not a huge difference. (From what I've read, the edition of Dura-Ace that I have may be particularly crappy.) But even with modern bikes, I will ride a $3k bike with Ultegra, and then a $1500 bike with Tiagra, and I can only tell the difference if I actually start thinking about it.

Practically speaking - modern Ultegra feels a little smoother. It's better put together, sure, the Tiagra shifts a little clunkier. But do I really care?

But - after a ride, I can you exactly whether I was riding my aluminum bike (a specialized Sequoia, their aluminum "comfort" bike, so not something stiff and racy or anything) vs riding my full carbon bike by how my body feels. On my full carbon - hands and arms feel great. On my aluminum - hands and arms feel a little tired and worn out. And I have 25c on my aluminum, and 23c on my carbon bike.

This year I've been looking for a bike-to-work commuter bike, but I'm not willing to give up ride quality. I've been looking for the Sora level full carbon bike. It's a higher upfront cost, but long term it seems like it's cheaper to go with Sora, but I still get the nicer ride quality of a full carbon frame.

tl;dr: The extra cost of the smoother and more compliant ride with full carbon is something that some people can feel, whereas higher priced components are not. Some people (like myself) are willing to pay more for a more comfortable ride, but not willing to pay more for very slightly better shifting.

P.S. Ok, I stand corrected a bit - it looks like it's the $2,099 version of the bike that's Sora. I that case - Sora seems like an odd choice. I was thinking it was like the Roubaix, where they offer a $1,600 version with Sora.

Last edited by PaulRivers; 05-02-14 at 06:05 PM.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 06:09 PM
  #15  
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,388
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 504 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 20 Posts
The only official release notes I could find were from Bike Rumor (though they make it clear that what they're writing is official info from Trek, not just a rumor) -
New Trek Domane Disc Brake Endurance Road Bike Debuts w/ New Bontrager Affinity Wheels

Anyone else have a source for other info?

It seems a little ambiguous whether the "new" model is "same domane + disc brakes" or whether much else has changed. Sounds like they moved to using those really annoying "seat mast" things that Trek likes on their bikes, but not sure if anything else significant has changed. (For example, reviews of the current model mentioned the rear of the bike feeling a lot more compliant than the front. I personally found the ride on the base series a bit dead, and the ride on the more expensive series a bit to stiff for a "comfort" bike.)
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 06:12 PM
  #16  
gc3
Falls Downalot
 
gc3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: DC
Posts: 3,103

Bikes: Now I Got Two

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd say as an un-objective observer that these new Treks are closing fast on the Spesh Tarmac/Roubaix level of fugliness...just one person's opinion...
gc3 is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 06:31 PM
  #17  
Nebby10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
The only official release notes I could find were from Bike Rumor (though they make it clear that what they're writing is official info from Trek, not just a rumor) -
New Trek Domane Disc Brake Endurance Road Bike Debuts w/ New Bontrager Affinity Wheels

Anyone else have a source for other info?

It seems a little ambiguous whether the "new" model is "same domane + disc brakes" or whether much else has changed. Sounds like they moved to using those really annoying "seat mast" things that Trek likes on their bikes, but not sure if anything else significant has changed. (For example, reviews of the current model mentioned the rear of the bike feeling a lot more compliant than the front. I personally found the ride on the base series a bit dead, and the ride on the more expensive series a bit to stiff for a "comfort" bike.)
The seat mast is only on the Domane 6 series, the 4 series still has a standard seatpost; which has been the case for even the current Domane's. Going from the pictures that I've seen, it looks like a standard Domane with dropouts switched to thru-axel and brake bridge removed, everything else looks the same.


As for the ride, it's stiffer up front because the rear has the isospeed pivot while there's only so much you can do to dampen a fork.
Nebby10 is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 06:49 PM
  #18  
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,388
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 504 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by Nebby10 View Post
The seat mast is only on the Domane 6 series, the 4 series still has a standard seatpost; which has been the case for even the current Domane's. Going from the pictures that I've seen, it looks like a standard Domane with dropouts switched to thru-axel and brake bridge removed, everything else looks the same.
Oops, I misread this bit - I thought it was saying that they were putting the mast from the 6 on the 4. But on rereading it, it sounds like you're right and I misread it, with the 4 having a standard seat post and the 6 having the seat mast.

UPDATE: It also means the use of a seat mast design on the 6-series, which Royce Beckon, Trek’s assistant road brand manager says makes a massive difference in overall compliance compared to the 4-series’ standard seatpost design. The 6-series also gets their asymmetric steerer (ovalized just above the crown to be wider side to side than it is front to back, giving it better fore/aft compliance without hurting steering precision), full carbon fiber fork. That’s versus a symmetric standard carbon fork with alloy steerer on the 4′s.

Still think those seat masts are annoying as heck though. Especially since it already has the iso coupler in the back, so it likely doesn't need more rear compliance.

Originally Posted by Nebby10 View Post
As for the ride, it's stiffer up front because the rear has the isospeed pivot while there's only so much you can do to dampen a fork.
Reviews I read comparing it to the Roubaix claimed the Domane was more compliant in the back but worse in the front (compared to the Rouabix), suggesting that the Roubaix did a better job of front compliance, suggesting that the Domane could possibly be made more compliant in the front regardless of the iso coupler thingy.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 06:59 PM
  #19  
Nebby10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Oops, I misread this bit - I thought it was saying that they were putting the mast from the 6 on the 4. But on rereading it, it sounds like you're right and I misread it, with the 4 having a standard seat post and the 6 having the seat mast.

UPDATE: It also means the use of a seat mast design on the 6-series, which Royce Beckon, Trek’s assistant road brand manager says makes a massive difference in overall compliance compared to the 4-series’ standard seatpost design. The 6-series also gets their asymmetric steerer (ovalized just above the crown to be wider side to side than it is front to back, giving it better fore/aft compliance without hurting steering precision), full carbon fiber fork. That’s versus a symmetric standard carbon fork with alloy steerer on the 4′s.

Still think those seat masts are annoying as heck though. Especially since it already has the iso coupler in the back, so it likely doesn't need more rear compliance.
I found that the seatpost vs seat mast made a difference. Trek claims it allows for more compliance and over multiple test rides I tend to agree that it does seem to feel that way.

Reviews I read comparing it to the Roubaix claimed the Domane was more compliant in the back but worse in the front (compared to the Rouabix), suggesting that the Roubaix did a better job of front compliance, suggesting that the Domane could possibly be made more compliant in the front regardless of the iso coupler thingy.
I can see the roubaix being able to absorb more road buzz via the zerts inserts, but Trek couldn't do something similar because of their patent. Would be interesting to see what Trek or any other companies can do to add more absorbtion/compliance to the fork without sacrificing too much...
Nebby10 is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 07:08 PM
  #20  
Smokehouse
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 636
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Urymoto View Post
I cant wait to see the dicks
no offense man...but glancing at the page, this is how I initially read your post....
Smokehouse is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 08:35 PM
  #21  
Dunbar
Senior Member
 
Dunbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 3,079

Bikes: Roubaix SL4 Expert , Cervelo S2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Nebby10 View Post
I can see the roubaix being able to absorb more road buzz via the zerts inserts, but Trek couldn't do something similar because of their patent. Would be interesting to see what Trek or any other companies can do to add more absorbtion/compliance to the fork without sacrificing too much...
I own a Roubaix SL4 and have done a 30-40 minute test ride on a Domane 6 series. The rear end compliance on the Domane is much better than the Roubaix even with the Cobble Cobbler seat post installed (I have one on mine). I honestly don't feel much difference in front end stiffness between the two. My suggestion for front end compliance would be to run a 25mm tires at a sensible pressure (I run 80psi @ 165-170lbs.) The Roubaix SL4 feels much stiffer and more responsive hammering hard out of the saddle. The Domane is more muted in comparison but as mentioned it has a much smoother ride over rough pavement. Both great bikes, you just need to decide which characteristics are your priority.
Dunbar is offline  
Old 05-02-14, 09:10 PM
  #22  
softreset
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 816
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Liked 47 Times in 18 Posts
- One of the guys I work with at the shop has a 2.0 series aluminum Domane with something like 6500 commuter miles and it's holding up just fine.

- The new 6.9 is Di2 where as the current 6.9 is DA9000 so you're getting Di2 FD/RD and shifting as well as disc brakes for $1000.00

- If I recall reading in one of the release reviews for R785 is Shimano is "not ready" to finalize the design and adjust it to be "worthy" of the DA label. Interestingly enough the 6.9 with DA Di2 (via Project One) is $8632.

- You get a seat mast on the 5-series Domane as well (not just the 6-series), the 4-series is the seat post as others have stated. I've logged about ~ 2000 miles on a 5-series and own a 4-series and the road buzz is definitely reduced. I dunno if it's worth the price premium though, it's definitely a YMMV.
softreset is offline  
Old 05-03-14, 06:03 AM
  #23  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,572
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1187 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by gc3 View Post
I'd say as an un-objective observer that these new Treks are closing fast on the Spesh Tarmac/Roubaix level of fugliness...just one person's opinion...
We differ there for sure. To me a standard flat top tube bike looks dated if not a bit fugly. I subscribe to form follows function and I prefer the look of a Roubaix and Domane...I have placed my Roubaix along side with Domane and they are close in shape. The future of bikes is the Roubaix shape, so might as well get used to it unless you want a bike with a lot of drop. Specialized took the Tarmac SL5 which is soon to be released in a slightly more conventional direction, because they could based upon the Tarmac's more conventional head tube height....the SL4 Tarmac winning the best road bike award 3 years in a row. So if you want a pure race bike, then a Tarmac has a more traditional shape.

Compared to Trek, I prefer the Roubaix all said..notably because I hate Trek's high neck seatpost treatment..for all their road bikes. I am ambivalent about the pivot seat post also as my Roubaix has enough rear compliance for me.
Further I don't like a 31mm seat post...no reason for it...if anything would prefer a proliferation of 25.4mm posts that Cannondale is now doing.
So I prefer the design of the Roubaix to the Domane and know some that have switched from the Domane to the Roubaix bike. Two of the fast guys in my club ride Domanes.

As to the disk thing...I won't subscribe if there is a weight difference...and there is. But if I rode in a fair amount of rainy whether which I don't, I prefer a disk bike. I also like a disk bike as a commuter or knock around road bike...just not my fastest group ride bike.

Last edited by Campag4life; 05-03-14 at 06:17 AM.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 05-03-14, 06:14 AM
  #24  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,572
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1187 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Dunbar View Post
I own a Roubaix SL4 and have done a 30-40 minute test ride on a Domane 6 series. The rear end compliance on the Domane is much better than the Roubaix even with the Cobble Cobbler seat post installed (I have one on mine). I honestly don't feel much difference in front end stiffness between the two. My suggestion for front end compliance would be to run a 25mm tires at a sensible pressure (I run 80psi @ 165-170lbs.) The Roubaix SL4 feels much stiffer and more responsive hammering hard out of the saddle. The Domane is more muted in comparison but as mentioned it has a much smoother ride over rough pavement. Both great bikes, you just need to decide which characteristics are your priority.
I think that is a fair comparison. I have read your comments before about the Roubaix SL4 having a harsh ride in back which promoted your move to the COBL post to tame it. I will go out on a limb and say that the rear Triangle of the SL4 Roubaix with longer chain and seat stays than the SL4 Tarmac is no stiffer and in fact, likely fractionally more compliant than the Tarmac which is perennially considered a favorite race bike among top amateurs. Specialized took the Roubaix in this direction by intent...to give the Roubaix a more race feel and performance. I personally believe a performance rider will prefer the stiff rear end of a Roubaix to a Domane. I would. I don't like compliant rear triangles personally. I prefer the responsiveness and feedback. Tom Boonen in this year's Roubaix race who lead most of the race with unbelievable effort rode his custom Roubaix SL4 with short head tube without a COBL seatpost. For anybody who watched that race, I am still amazed by the beating of those riders.
Far and away the assault any rider takes on a road bike is the front of the bike through the hands and not in the rear of the bike through the saddle. This is for the simple reason that better riders use the saddle as a perch and not a lazy boy chair. They ride more unweighted with higher leg forces to the pedals.
So that is my opinion. I side with Specialized who took the Roubaix in the direction of the Tarmac albeit with slightly more laid out angles which by design introduces more compliancy.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 05-03-14, 11:50 PM
  #25  
roadandmountain
Banned.
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by gc3 View Post
I'd say as an un-objective observer that these new Treks are closing fast on the Spesh Tarmac/Roubaix level of fugliness...just one person's opinion...
I am in complete agreement.

The entire industry is moving towards generic fugliness. Matte black is despicable. Gotta love how it picks up and holds fingerprints like a champ. You can't even touch the bike!

The days of fun bike colors are gone.

Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Reviews I read comparing it to the Roubaix claimed the Domane was more compliant in the back but worse in the front (compared to the Rouabix), suggesting that the Roubaix did a better job of front compliance, suggesting that the Domane could possibly be made more compliant in the front regardless of the iso coupler thingy.
I've read the same. What is spesh doing with the front end that trek isn't?

1. smaller head tube diameter?

2. squishy gel in the fork?

3. bar tape, carbon bars....?

Last edited by roadandmountain; 05-03-14 at 11:54 PM.
roadandmountain is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.