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Clipping in

Old 05-09-14, 11:43 AM
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Clipping in

Hi,

Just joined this forum.

Hoping someone has some advice.

I have Shimano Light Action SPD-SL pedals.

I am able to clip out easily. However clipping in is a struggle. Problem I have is pedal keeps turning over such that I cannot clip in. Is there a technique to clip in?

I have read that Shimano has a pedal where one side is platform and the other is to clip in but seems to be unavailable in SL. My shoes only accept SL so I am restricted.

Maybe there is an adjustment of the cleat I need to do?

Your advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks and I look forward to your reply.

Bruce
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Old 05-09-14, 11:47 AM
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Yes it's easier to clip in if you adjust the cleats. Just pay attention where you feet likes to go when trying to clip-in and adjust the cleat to do that. Have the cleat at balls of your feet lined up with the pedal spindle.

Don't know what to suggest for improving clip, other than to practice. I look down quick to make sure pedal is positioned correctly, actual clipping is no look. So I glance quick and I'm off.
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Old 05-09-14, 12:02 PM
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I use SPD and SPD-SL. The key to the SLs is that you need to drag your toe over the pedal to hook the cleat into the front of the pedal before pushing down. Most people make the mistake of trying to get the two aligned by angling the foot or hoping to catch the pedal when it is flat. I start with the foot that is clipped in at the 10-11 oclock position, push off, and clip in on the first rotation as the unclipped pedal reaches the 12 oclock position. Once you get the hang of it you don't even have to look down.
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Old 05-09-14, 12:07 PM
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Hi there welcome to the forum. Agree with Zymphad's recommendations. Also know that new cleats can sometimes be harder to engage than when they've been broken in after a good dozen rides or so. They will become easier to clip in as you ride them more as long as your pedal tension is not set really high.
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Old 05-09-14, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by redlude97
I use SPD and SPD-SL. The key to the SLs is that you need to drag your toe over the pedal to hook the cleat into the front of the pedal before pushing down. Most people make the mistake of trying to get the two aligned by angling the foot or hoping to catch the pedal when it is flat. I start with the foot that is clipped in at the 10-11 oclock position, push off, and clip in on the first rotation as the unclipped pedal reaches the 12 oclock position. Once you get the hang of it you don't even have to look down.
+1. Hooking with the front is key.
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Old 05-09-14, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by zymphad
Just pay attention where you feet likes to go when trying to clip-in and adjust the cleat to do that.
Not sure many bike fitter-types would agree with that advice.

Me, I ride Speedplay, so I don't have a problem, unless I forget to occasionally (once a year, maybe a bit more if I ride a lot in the rain) oil the springs in the cleats.
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Old 05-09-14, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by KenshiBiker
Not sure many bike fitter-types would agree with that advice.

Me, I ride Speedplay, so I don't have a problem, unless I forget to occasionally (once a year, maybe a bit more if I ride a lot in the rain) oil the springs in the cleats.
He can do what's comfortable. I couldn't care less what some bike fitter thinks, I do what is comfortable for me and what works to clip in and out fast and safely. I hope the OP does try different things until he gets what is comfortable and what works for him.
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Old 05-09-14, 08:56 PM
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I think some pedals or any pedals for that matter all require a certain amount of familiarity by the user.. Just keep practicing the movement required to get the right feel. Stick the bike in a trainer or maybe clip and unclip once up to a speed that will allow you to practice while you are moving. After awhile you won't even think about it anymore.
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