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Opinions on Specialized Sirrus?

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Opinions on Specialized Sirrus?

Old 05-28-14, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by blacksapphire08
I found the flat bar to be more comfortable. Can you just add drop bars to a compatible flat bar bike? I noticed that Trek and other retailers sell drop bars in a variety of shapes/sizes. And then there are clip ons but I would imagine they're not as good?
OP, I've refrained from chiming in on this thread so far (for various reasons); however, this ^^^ prompts me to join the discussion.

I ride a flat-bar road bike. I have various reasons for not using drop bars; they are not relevant here. That said, the one piece of advice I would give you is this: do not purchase a flat-bar road bike with the intention of possibly converting it to drop-bars later on, or adding clip-ons or other such kludges. Try if you possibly can to decide at the outset whether you want to use flat-bars or drop-bars for your road cycling, and purchase accordingly.

Reasons. A bike properly designed for road cycling with flat-bars will have an effective top tube about 1 to 2 inches (anywhere from 2.5 to 5 centimetres) longer than the equivalent size designed for drop-bars. This is to partially off-set the longer total reach of a drop-bar bike when the forward extension of the hoods is taken into account. The current Sirrus lineup (up to and including the Sirrus Comp, not the carbon ones) is a good example. I would ride a '54' Specialized Roubaix or Secteur, with an effective top tube of 54.9 cms. I would ride a 'Medium' current Sirrus Comp with an effective top tube of 58.5. So, if you, for example, properly fit a medium Sirrus, bought one, and later decided you really want(ed) drop bars, a conversion would never be quite right -- too long a reach to the hoods, even with a stupid-short stem etc. That's one reason; the other is simply that it's a waste of money. Converting a flat-bar bike to drops gets expensive. But it's the first reason that really matters.

That is what, in my opinion, is wrong with the current full-carbon Sirrus bikes, and similar like the Trek 7.7FX; they are drop-bar road frames with flat bars/controls put on and sold as flat-bar road bikes. Back to my example, were I to want e.g. a Sirrus Expert Carbon I would have to buy 'up a size' at minimum, but that results in compromises I would not want elsewhere -- the bike would be the wrong size for me.

Those comments aside, your decision should come down to personal preference. If at all possible you should try to give drop-bars a thorough trial; perhaps by renting a correctly-fitted bike for a week or two? Just to see if in fact you might actually like them once you had time to get used to them. But if not, then in my view there is very little lost by going with a correctly-fitted flat bar bike, especially if you use bar-ends, for road cycling (always assuming equivalent quality, gearing, etc.) for the typical non-competitive road cyclist.
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Old 05-28-14, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by stephtu
We find them more comfortable because of the multiple hand positions offered and want others to also be comfortable, we are trying to help them. If you are comfortable with single position, or single position + bar ends, then there isn't a point, don't bother. But if you feel like you could use more positions, then different stem and/or frame size to equate the distances involved should have solved the back/neck issues.
But not everyone is the same.. Some have chronic back issues, some have very poor circulation ect, ect, ect.... To the point, I've found that a property fitted flat bar bike is just a good as a drop bar bike..

That's me.. I'd never attempt to sway anyone in the direction of either type of bar.. Some can't ride a flat bar because their hands get numb after short distances. Some can't ride a drop bar because them extra hand positions cause problems in other areas if they are used..

Trust me, my bike was not purchased because it was cheap. For what I paid for it I could easily gotten a high end drop bar bike.. Against my will, I even took the advise of others and rode a drop bar for 2 weeks.. I hated every mile on that thing..

While the drop bar may offer more hand positions to some, to others like me, they do not because I can't use them..
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Old 05-28-14, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by blacksapphire08
I found the flat bar to be more comfortable. Can you just add drop bars to a compatible flat bar bike? I noticed that Trek and other retailers sell drop bars in a variety of shapes/sizes. And then there are clip ons but I would imagine they're not as good?
You can change a flat bar to drop bar, but it's really expensive mainly because shift/brake levers are pricey, $150+ a set. Add handlebar and stem and that's over $200. I would decide between flat bar and drop bar now, once, and be done with it. But be sure to test drop bars *with a stem swap* to give you comparable body angle/reach/drop to the flat bar you find comfortable to rule them in or out. Bring a measuring tape! Shops swap stems for customers all the time, they should have a box of customer swap outs and be willing to put them on a bike you want to test.
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Old 05-28-14, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by raqball
But not everyone is the same.. Some have chronic back issues, some have very poor circulation ect, ect, ect.... To the point, I've found that a property fitted flat bar bike is just a good as a drop bar bike..
Of course different people like different positions. But it seems your problem with drop bars is that you've never really ridden a *properly fitted* one. Look at the pictures in the following post: https://www.bikeforums.net/general-cy...l#post16797792, of drop bar riders with very upright positions, contrast with typical racers. If you want to argue against drop bars, don't argue because of the back/neck issues you had, because that was caused by the wrong stem (and possibly wrong top tube & head tube lengths), not because of the drop bar itself.

Against my will, I even took the advise of others and rode a drop bar for 2 weeks.. I hated every mile on that thing..
Apparently they didn't give you good advice, since they neglected to emphasize stem swap to get you to the reach & angle where you feel comfortable, which is of supreme importance.

You might correctly state "I can't use drop bars as set up out of the box" on most road bikes by default, but "can't use drop bars period" may be inaccurate. And it's misleading to argue for flat bars for someone else when you never even bothered trying a stem swap, you don't have sufficient experience to make the call. Would you call a bike too big or small for yourself if you refused to slide the seat up or down? More cumbersome height adjustment was the loss when threadless took over from quill stems, but then again swapping stems became a zillion times easier.

Last edited by stephtu; 05-28-14 at 12:45 PM.
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Old 05-28-14, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2
There are enough of us who started with flat bars and wound up with drop bars that you should at least be aware of this path. It usually goes like this.

1. Aspiring cyclist walks into LBS looking for something comfortable. Cruisers or comfort hybrids jump out as the obvious choice with their plush saddles, wide tires, and sometimes suspension forks and seatposts.
2. Cycling newbie looks to mod his or her comfort bike to get a little more efficient.
3. After mods, cycling newbie concludes he or she wants something more efficient for 20 or 30 mile rides. Buys a sporty hybrid.
4. A couple of months to a couple of years later, cycling newbie is now hooked on cycling, would like to hang with his or her fast roadie friends, or complete a century or multi day charity ride and concludes that only a drop bar road bike will do.
Pretty much. I've seen more people go this route than go the other way, despite what Wandered may have experienced. I did the same thing.

Step 1: Bought a Sirrus Comp in May 2012.
Step 2: July added Speedplay pedals.
Step 3: Did a century in October. Signed up for AIDS/LifeCycle 2013
Step 4: Bought a road bike in December 2012 (Roubaix Expert).

The Sirrus has sat mostly unused. Since I have a rack on it I keep thinking that when I decide to start commuting by bike I'll use it for that with some saddle bags. Someday.
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Old 05-28-14, 01:09 PM
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Thanks guys I didnt realize that a flat bar bike has different measurements than the drop bar road bikes. That could be part of the reason why I found the Trek Madone to be so uncomfortable. Also I totally forgot about that the shifters/brake levers were different and would have to be changed. I suppose you could move them on top of the bar but then you would lose a riding position. I will try a different size next time im at the store to see if it makes a difference for me. Sounds like going smaller is the best bet?
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Old 05-28-14, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by stephtu
Of course different people like different positions. But it seems your problem with drop bars is that you've never really ridden a *properly fitted* one. Look at the pictures in the following post: https://www.bikeforums.net/general-cy...l#post16797792, of drop bar riders with very upright positions, contrast with typical racers. If you want to argue against drop bars, don't argue because of the back/neck issues you had, because that was caused by the wrong stem (and possibly wrong top tube & head tube lengths), not because of the drop bar itself.


Apparently they didn't give you good advice, since they neglected to emphasize stem swap to get you to the reach & angle where you feel comfortable, which is of supreme importance.

You might correctly state "I can't use drop bars as set up out of the box" on most road bikes by default, but "can't use drop bars period" may be inaccurate. And it's misleading to argue for flat bars for someone else when you never even bothered trying a stem swap, you don't have sufficient experience to make the call. Would you call a bike too big or small for yourself if you refused to slide the seat up or down? More cumbersome height adjustment was the loss when threadless took over from quill stems, but then again swapping stems became a zillion times easier.
You see that's my problem = when people try to force a drop bar down the throats of others.. It's either you are new and don't know any better, it's your fit is wrong, or there is another reason as to why people choose a flat bar.. The answer is never because that's what the person wants..

I don't need a drop bar crammed down my throat.. I made an educated decision to buy a flat bar bike and I am thrilled with it.. Could I have messed around with a different stem on a drop bar like my LBS suggested? Sure! Could I have went back to my LBS and have them do more adjustments? Sure? But why bother if a flat bar works for me?

I honestly don't get it..... Now you attack me because I don't know any better and you attack the experience of my LBS and their ability to do a proper fit.. All because of what? You want me to ride a drop bar?

I have been properly fitted for a drop bar bike.. My LBS always does a great job, I have no doubt about it! I don't think you've read any of my previous posts in this thread as I clearly stated my that LBS explained using a different stem...

Oh and I'm not the one trying to convince anyone that a specific type of bar is better for ---> them..

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Old 05-28-14, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by daihard
The 7.4 FX has 700x32c tyres. The 7.5 FX has 700x28c's. The 7.6 / 7.7 FXs have 700x25c's.
My bad.....thanks for correcting
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Old 05-28-14, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by JakiChan

Step 1: Bought a Sirrus Comp in May 2012.
Step 2: July added Speedplay pedals.
Step 3: Did a century in October. Signed up for AIDS/LifeCycle 2013
Step 4: Bought a road bike in December 2012 (Roubaix Expert).
Here was my progression:

1) 2007: Bought a cheap Hybrid for commuting. Wanted to make sure it was for me so I bought cheap!
2) 2008: Upgraded to a better Hybrid after I found I was diggin it.
3) 2009: Retired and bought a more sporty flat bar road bike since I didn't need to commute any longer.
4) 2011: Bought a higher end flat bar road bike because I wanted something better..
5) 2013: Bought the mother of all flat bar road bike = The one I have now..

All of my old bikes are donated to local bike kitchens..
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Old 05-28-14, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by blacksapphire08
I will try a different size next time im at the store to see if it makes a difference for me. Sounds like going smaller is the best bet?
I don't think I'd go smaller, that would lower bars which might be counterproductive. What I would try is:
- different line of road bikes, so-called "endurance" line, like Specialized Secteur, Giant Defy, Fuji Sportif, Cannondale Synapse, Trek Domane, Felt Z, etc. These start with higher head tubes, sometimes slightly shorter top tubes as well, catering to more upright positions. I think the Madone 1.5 is Trek's "H2" fit which is somewhere between "endurance fit" and hard core race "H1" fit.
- stem flipped up, not down, and one with more rise, and maybe less length. Best is to measure. Start with saddle position in relationship to the bottom bracket on the flat bar bike you like, and set up same position on road bike. Then measure from tip of saddle (assuming comparable size saddles) to the flat bar, you want similar length from the tip to maybe halfway between the flat tops & the brake hoods. Then, look for distance between top of saddle and bar top, and set up similar relationship on the top/hoods. Pick stem that gets you to the right length & distance. Some shops have variable angle stems, though they are heavier (and you still need to pick the right length).
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Old 05-28-14, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by raqball
You see that's my problem = when people try to force a drop bar down the throats of others..
No one's trying to force a drop bar down anyone's throat. We are just encouraging newbies to give them a proper trial, based on a comfortable customized fit, rather than just the default stem length that came on the bike and the height & flipped up or down position it happened to be in on the test ride. Not changing stems is basically equivalent to not adjusting seat height for comfort, the fit is wrong.

It's either you are new and don't know any better, it's your fit is wrong, or there is another reason as to why people choose a flat bar.. The answer is never because that's what the person wants..
From your testimony, it's evident you didn't like drop bars because the fit was wrong and it hurt your body ... It wasn't because you didn't like the shape of the hoods in your hands or the way the levers worked. Some people with small hands have difficulty with STI levers, the amount they have to push inward, and getting good grip for braking, those would be way better reasons to choose a flat bar, compared to uncomfortable back/neck because of refusal to change the stem.

I made an educated decision to buy a flat bar bike and I am thrilled with it.. Could I have messed around with a different stem on a drop bar like my LBS suggested? Sure! Could I have went back to my LBS and have them do more adjustments? Sure? But why bother if a flat bar works for me?
That's fine for you, but why recommend for other people to use flat bar, based on apparently uneducated preference based on poor fit? If your decision was an educated one, in my mind you wouldn't have tortured yourself for two weeks in an uncomfortable position, you would have gone out of the shop comfortable in the first place. You'd then maybe experiment with lower and/or longer position, concluded they were uncomfortable, and return to what was comfortable. Then you'd decide whether you wanted the extra positions or not. You were the one who barged into this thread proclaiming "FALSE!" to someone's suggestion that drop bars are more comfortable on long rides, for them.

I honestly don't get it..... Now you attack me because I don't know any better and you attack the experience of my LBS and their ability to do a proper fit.. All because of what? You want me to ride a drop bar?
I'm not attacking you for riding a flat bar. I'm attacking you for recommending that others ride a flat bar, based on your experiences with a drop bar, because your experiences were a flawed experiment, that shouldn't carry over to other people.

I have been properly fitted for a drop bar bike..
You were uncomfortable on it, so I wouldn't call it "properly fitted". Proper fit takes into account a rider's preferences and body limitations. There is no fit method that is right for everyone immediately off the initial setup. They may have started you on a default position based on what is comfortable for most people, but they clearly didn't finish the job.

I clearly stated my that LBS explained using a different stem...
But you also stated that you never bothered trying it. How can you properly conclude that you would still be uncomfortable on a different stem without trying it?

Of course, if you are happy with flat bar, then fine, none of us care what you choose for yourself. You are very defensive about your choice, I don't know why you feel "under attack".

Last edited by stephtu; 05-28-14 at 02:19 PM.
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Old 05-28-14, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by stephtu
No one's trying to force a drop bar down anyone's throat. We are just encouraging newbies to give them a proper trial, based on a comfortable customized fit, rather than just the default stem length that came on the bike and the height & flipped up or down position it happened to be in on the test ride. Not changing stems is basically equivalent to not adjusting seat height for comfort, the fit is wrong.


From your testimony, it's evident you didn't like drop bars because the fit was wrong and it hurt your body ... It wasn't because you didn't like the shape of the hoods in your hands or the way the levers worked. Some people with small hands have difficulty with STI levers, the amount they have to push inward, and getting good grip for braking, those would be way better reasons to choose a flat bar, compared to uncomfortable back/neck because of refusal to change the stem.


That's fine for you, but why recommend for other people to use flat bar, based on apparently uneducated preference based on poor fit? If your decision was an educated one, in my mind you wouldn't have tortured yourself for two weeks in an uncomfortable position, you would have gone out of the shop comfortable in the first place. You'd then maybe experiment with lower and/or longer position, concluded they were uncomfortable, and return to what was comfortable. Then you'd decide whether you wanted the extra positions or not. You were the one who barged into this thread proclaiming "FALSE!" to someone's suggestion that drop bars are more comfortable on long rides, for them.


I'm not attacking you for riding a flat bar. I'm attacking you for recommending that others ride a flat bar, based on your experiences with a drop bar, because your experiences were a flawed experiment, that shouldn't carry over to other people.


You were uncomfortable on it, so I wouldn't call it "properly fitted". Proper fit takes into account a rider's preferences and body limitations. There is no fit method is right for everyone. They may have started you on a default position based on what is comfortable for most people, but they clearly didn't finish the job.


But you also stated that you never bothered trying it. How can you properly conclude that you would still be uncomfortable on a different stem without trying it?

Of course, if you are happy with flat bar, then fine, none of us care what you choose for yourself. You are very defensive about your choice, I don't know why you feel "under attack".
Again... Why on earth would I bother wasting my time, their time and extra $$ just so I can ride a drop bar? I am seriously confused as to why you think that is an option...

I have no, zero, nadda issues on flat bars. I do 40-miles a day. I do 60 miles rides and I do century rides all with no issues whatsoever..

What is so great about a drop bar bike that I don't currently already have?

I guess at this point I am beating a dead horse.. You keep saying my fit was wrong but you were not there, you did not see my position on the bike and you have no clue what my ailments and body issues may be.. Based on this ---> I surrender...
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Old 05-28-14, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by raqball
Again... Why on earth would I bother wasting my time, their time and extra $$ just so I can ride a drop bar? I am seriously confused as to why you think that is an option...
I'm not telling you to do it, I'm just not seeing why you are bothering proclaiming flat bars are the greatest to others.

You keep saying my fit was wrong but you were not there, you did not see my position on the bike and you have no clue what my ailments and body issues may be..
How you can claim your fit was right, if you were so uncomfortable, and never even tried different stems? Proper fit = comfortable! Identical position can be had, equal comfort should be possible. Flat bar vs. drop bar should be chosen based on preferences for hand positions and lever types/sizes, not based on torso & neck position which can be equalized.
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Old 05-28-14, 02:33 PM
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Now you are just plain making things up..

I never said flat bars are the greatest to others. I've never tried to push anyone to get a flat bar bike.. What I've tried to do is say that flat bars are an option, just like they are for me..

It's you who has for some odd reason determined that anything less than a drop bar is unacceptable to everyone on the planet earth. Why? I have no clue..

I can claim my fit was right because my LBS did it and I trust them 100%.. I won't respond to you any further because as I said, now you are just flat out making things up which = I am not interested in playing your game..

Add another to ye ole' blocked list...

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Old 05-28-14, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by raqball
Here was my progression:

1) 2007: Bought a cheap Hybrid for commuting. Wanted to make sure it was for me so I bought cheap!
2) 2008: Upgraded to a better Hybrid after I found I was diggin it.
3) 2009: Retired and bought a more sporty flat bar road bike since I didn't need to commute any longer.
4) 2011: Bought a higher end flat bar road bike because I wanted something better..
5) 2013: Bought the mother of all flat bar road bike = The one I have now..

All of my old bikes are donated to local bike kitchens..
Yeah, I haven't seen a lot of that progression amongst the ALC community. But for the last two years I've seen plenty of folks start training in January on a hybrid and somehow have a drop-bar road bike come June. It may be just a California thing. Plenty of flat bars on ALC but they're in the minority for sure.
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Old 05-28-14, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by JakiChan
Yeah, I haven't seen a lot of that progression amongst the ALC community. But for the last two years I've seen plenty of folks start training in January on a hybrid and somehow have a drop-bar road bike come June. It may be just a California thing. Plenty of flat bars on ALC but they're in the minority for sure.
I am without a doubt an odd ball cyclist.. I know many people can't do long distances on a flat bar because their fingers go numb.. I've never had this issue.. I do tend to move my hands around quite often and I even have some rather odd hand angles on the bar and bar ends that might look uncomfortable to others, but they work for me..

If people want a Hybrid with a flat bar them more power to em! Maybe they will be like me and have no issue going distance on them..

My only advise to a new buyer who wants a flat bar would be to do as I did. Buy the 1st bike ( be it a flat or a drop bar) cheap and adjust from there with the next bike..
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Old 05-28-14, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by raqball
If people want a Hybrid with a flat bar them more power to em! Maybe they will be like me and have no issue going distance on them..
I will say, I think the Sirrus is closer to a flat-bar road bike than a hybrid. One of the reasons I think the Roubaix felt so comfortable was that it's geometry is very similar to the Sirrus.
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Old 05-28-14, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by raqball
Now you are just plain making things up..

It's you who has for some odd reason determined that anything less than a drop bar is unacceptable to everyone on the planet earth. Why? I have no clue..
You are the one making things up, I said no such thing. I never said flat bars are unacceptable. I'm just saying that if someone is going to reject drop bars, they ought to do so for reasons that make sense, not because some shop sent them out in some position that is bad for them, not because of a different torso angle & reach is making them uncomfortable, because those things can be fixed, it's not an inherent problem with drop bars.

I can claim my fit was right because my LBS did it and I trust them 100%..
Then you were wrong to trust them. If you end up uncomfortable, your fit wasn't right, period. Shops can only guess what will be comfortable for someone, they can only send people out initially based on default average preferences. Then they have to adjust based on how you feel, if you are still uncomfortable, the fit isn't right yet! The fact that you were left uncomfortable is reason enough to know that the fit wasn't right. Why should a right fit leave someone in pain?

It's like a person insisting "my pants fit right, I trust my tailor 100%", and meanwhile they are stepping on pant cuffs all day. The LBS made an error in not properly querying your position preferences initially, or you erred in passing on trying a different stem. If you are so happy with flat bar, then why did you bother trying drop bar at all? If you were going to try drop bar, why make such a try rigged to not work?

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Old 05-28-14, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by JakiChan
I will say, I think the Sirrus is closer to a flat-bar road bike than a hybrid. One of the reasons I think the Roubaix felt so comfortable was that it's geometry is very similar to the Sirrus.
My 2013 Sirrus Limited SL4 uses the exact same frame as the Roubaix SL4.. Very comfortable bike!

The regular Sirrus is an awesome bike, no doubt but in my opinion Specialized seriously hooked up the Limited SL4.. It's a pure high end road bike with a flat bar, Di2 shifting and a ton of awesome features..

MSRP on mine was $5,000 but I got it for much less, brand new from my LBS.. Specialized only made 300 of them and I guess they were not selling so discount galore direct from Specialized.. Even so, and in hindsight, I would have paid the 5K for it because it's such an awesome bike in my opinion of course..

Last edited by raqball; 05-28-14 at 04:13 PM.
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Old 05-28-14, 04:16 PM
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I found that bike very interesting. I mean the Ki-2 thing always seemed a little hack-ish, but Specialized liked it enough to sell it. It wouldn't be needed now, since you can probably do 6870 with 11-32 and not need the Ki2 system.
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Old 05-28-14, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by JakiChan
I found that bike very interesting. I mean the Ki-2 thing always seemed a little hack-ish, but Specialized liked it enough to sell it. It wouldn't be needed now, since you can probably do 6870 with 11-32 and not need the Ki2 system.
Didn't know that.. Thanks for the info..

As far as the Ki2 goes I don't have any issues and the shifting is smooth and instantaneous..
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Old 05-28-14, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by blacksapphire08
Thanks guys I didnt realize that a flat bar bike has different measurements than the drop bar road bikes. That could be part of the reason why I found the Trek Madone to be so uncomfortable. Also I totally forgot about that the shifters/brake levers were different and would have to be changed. I suppose you could move them on top of the bar but then you would lose a riding position. I will try a different size next time im at the store to see if it makes a difference for me. Sounds like going smaller is the best bet?
Not necessarily. 2 years ago, I had no idea what size road bike would fit me. I assumed based on stand over I needed a 53 or 54 cm bike When I bought my Salsa, the LBS convinced me to try going up to 55 cm and it was the right choice for me. Too small bikes had me too hunched over. A larger frame allowed me to stretch out a bit more, though I don't have much stand over clearance.
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