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Girl Lost in a Bike Store

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Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Girl Lost in a Bike Store

Old 07-14-14, 03:55 PM
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calliebear9
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Girl Lost in a Bike Store

I am looking to get a road bike. It will be my first. I have had my Jamis Coda Sport for over a year and I know at the end of the summer I want to make the switch to a road bike so I can keep adding miles. I like my current bike, but I want to go faster and further and I think I need to upgrade to do that. I find bike stores a little bit similar to car dealers in that there are a lot of bits and pieces of the bikes (or cars) that I donít really understand not having been brought up around them. So I prepare myself by researching and then asking a bunch of questions. But, unfortunately, I donít know what I donít know. And I want to ask the right questions when I get to the store.

The LBS that I frequent carries Trek and Giant. I stopped by this weekend and tried out a Trek Lexa SL as I wanted to see if I even liked the feel of a road bike with drop handlebars. Surprisingly I did. So after the ride, my internet research began.

Based on my Local Bike Stores in the near area I have brand options of Trek, Specialized, Giant, and going further out I have Felt, Jamis, Scott, Raleigh and Bianchi. I like the LBS I have been going to, and as I said, they carry Trek and Giant, so based on convenience I would love to stick with them, but at the same time, I want to find the best bike and can always switch for service. I want to stay at or under $2k all in - so including the pedals and saddle-bag, etc. Does a bike purchase usually include a fitting?

I read online that I should try to maximize my components in terms of quality for my dollar. So I had focused on Shimano 105 as I didnít want entry level and wanted to grow into the bike. I noticed that I can get a aluminum bike with 105 components in my price range or I can try a carbon/composite bike with lesser components (Tiagra). I canít seem to get a carbon with 105. Is the frame material more important than the level of components? Is there a big difference between Tiagra and 105? Is there anything important to know about the difference between alum and carbon besides the ride will feel different?

Secondly I am worried about gearing. I am big girl- letís just say that. I need the low gears to haul my butt up a hill. That being said, I am not climbing any mountains any time soon. I read that for lower gears I would be better off with a Triple. Is that true and I should only target bikes that have triples? Or will a compact get me where I need to be?

I want a bike that is a relaxed fit, so not a racing bike with aggressive geometry, but rather an endurance bike that is designed to be comfortable on for hours.

So right now I am thinking of checking out:
Trek Lexa SLX- it has the Shimano 105 but is alum, is available in compact and triple
Giant Avail 1
Giant Avail Composite 2
Trek Silque- has Tiagra parts but an composite/carbon frame and is getting pricey (btw I hate the name Silque)
Trek Domane- gets pricier, but seems to be more relaxed than the Silque
Trek Madone- pricey and I think too aggressive
Specialized Ruby Sport- is this geometry too aggressive?

I also threw in the Raleigh Capri 3.0 and the Bianchi Impulso Dama, but I need to go to shops I havenít been to for those and I am not as familiar with the brands so I am not sure I want to try it.

Any advice is appreciated particularly related to my two questions.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by calliebear9 View Post
I am looking to get a road bike. It will be my first. I have had my Jamis Coda Sport for over a year and I know at the end of the summer I want to make the switch to a road bike so I can keep adding miles. I like my current bike, but I want to go faster and further and I think I need to upgrade to do that. I find bike stores a little bit similar to car dealers in that there are a lot of bits and pieces of the bikes (or cars) that I don’t really understand not having been brought up around them. So I prepare myself by researching and then asking a bunch of questions. But, unfortunately, I don’t know what I don’t know. And I want to ask the right questions when I get to the store.

The LBS that I frequent carries Trek and Giant. I stopped by this weekend and tried out a Trek Lexa SL as I wanted to see if I even liked the feel of a road bike with drop handlebars. Surprisingly I did. So after the ride, my internet research began.

Based on my Local Bike Stores in the near area I have brand options of Trek, Specialized, Giant, and going further out I have Felt, Jamis, Scott, Raleigh and Bianchi. I like the LBS I have been going to, and as I said, they carry Trek and Giant, so based on convenience I would love to stick with them, but at the same time, I want to find the best bike and can always switch for service. I want to stay at or under $2k all in - so including the pedals and saddle-bag, etc. Does a bike purchase usually include a fitting?

I read online that I should try to maximize my components in terms of quality for my dollar. So I had focused on Shimano 105 as I didn’t want entry level and wanted to grow into the bike. I noticed that I can get a aluminum bike with 105 components in my price range or I can try a carbon/composite bike with lesser components (Tiagra). I can’t seem to get a carbon with 105. Is the frame material more important than the level of components? Is there a big difference between Tiagra and 105? Is there anything important to know about the difference between alum and carbon besides the ride will feel different?

Secondly I am worried about gearing. I am big girl- let’s just say that. I need the low gears to haul my butt up a hill. That being said, I am not climbing any mountains any time soon. I read that for lower gears I would be better off with a Triple. Is that true and I should only target bikes that have triples? Or will a compact get me where I need to be?

I want a bike that is a relaxed fit, so not a racing bike with aggressive geometry, but rather an endurance bike that is designed to be comfortable on for hours.

So right now I am thinking of checking out:
Trek Lexa SLX- it has the Shimano 105 but is alum, is available in compact and triple
Giant Avail 1
Giant Avail Composite 2
Trek Silque- has Tiagra parts but an composite/carbon frame and is getting pricey (btw I hate the name Silque)
Trek Domane- gets pricier, but seems to be more relaxed than the Silque
Trek Madone- pricey and I think too aggressive
Specialized Ruby Sport- is this geometry too aggressive?

I also threw in the Raleigh Capri 3.0 and the Bianchi Impulso Dama, but I need to go to shops I haven’t been to for those and I am not as familiar with the brands so I am not sure I want to try it.

Any advice is appreciated particularly related to my two questions.
The 2015 Felt Z5 will debut later this month, with a carbon frame, internal (Di2 ready) cabling and 105/5800 components at just under 2k. Also, it will have a threaded versus press fit bottom bracket. Yes, most bike shops include fitting as part of the purchase.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:13 PM
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You don't need a triple to have low gear. My bike has a compact crankset with 50/34 chain ring and 11-32 cassette. So I can get as low as 34/32 which is 27.9 gear inches. If you have a triple with a 30 tooth ring and 11-28 cassette which is common for a triple you get 30/28 or 28.1 gear inches.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:16 PM
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The fit of the frame should be the most important...not the material.

If you can get the 105...get it. I had Tiagra on my first bike. The finish and performance of the 105 will be a big step up from Tiagra.

Unless your are under 5'3"...don't limit yourself to womens specific frames.

You do not need a triple. Most "beginner" bikes are going to be equipped with 50/34 cranks and 11-32 cassettes...which will give you roughly the low range of a triple.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:21 PM
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It is true that you have a greater number of gears with a triple, but a compact trims weight, and with the substitution of a 30t rear cassette (which I would ask the LBS to do at purchase) you will have as low a gear as a 30/26, pretty near. I bought my wife a Jamis Ventura (aluminum) with that cassette and she's been able to get up the same hills I can with a 34/26, just slower. Total weight is 23 lbs., which is not super light, but it was an inexpensive bike and since she's just riding for fitness and enjoyment she doesn't feel that it's heavy, just puts it in the 30t and gets there.

The overall weight of the bike makes a difference in climbing, and the weight of the wheels makes an even bigger difference, but that only matters if you're trying to go fast. If you wish to lose weight by cycling, the first priority should be comfort, and a close second should be gearing. It is the amount of time that you spend at a relatively low heart rate that will allow you to spend more time on the bike, so you have to feel comfy and not afraid of hills, and not be stuck with a gear that makes you struggle. So if you try a compact with 34/30 low gear and it doesn't feel like you can handle it, a triple might make more sense. Or look at cyclocross bikes which typically come with components that allow lower gears off the bat.

I have carbon and steel road bikes and an aluminum mountain bike. Which you prefer is really up to you. Carbon frames in your price range are likely to be mid-modulus rather than high-modulus and a bit heavier than the really light race frames, so if your dollar gets you into an aluminum frame with a lighter group and lower overall weight AND you feel comfortable, you might be happier. Once you've gotten a bike that feels good and keeps you out on the road, you'll learn much more about what you wish you would have done and you can start looking into the future at your dream bike.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by calliebear9 View Post
Is the frame material more important than the level of components? Is there a big difference between Tiagra and 105? Is there anything important to know about the difference between alum and carbon besides the ride will feel different?
Frame material now brakes down into price points, there will be a cut off from Aluminum to Carbon Fiber, then almost all the bikes within that price point will be same material. For the ride, how they ride will depend on the design of the frame, Alu used or CF layup, so may variables. For Tiagra vs 105, which model are you talking about is key, 4600 Tiagra is 10 speed, 5800 which is the latest 105 is 11 speed, and there is a big difference with the speed

Originally Posted by calliebear9 View Post
Is that true and I should only target bikes that have triples? Or will a compact get me where I need to be?
Unless you are in an area with lots & lots of hills, would avoid both compacts and triples, triples are becoming a dead format with 11 speed, there isn't even the option with 5800, and compacts always seem to have a lot of useful gears missing. With 5800 you have a semi-compact 52/36 option or standard 53/39 which combined with the wider ratio cassettes give plenty of options to replace the compact.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:37 PM
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I ride a steel road bike, (old) 9 speed Tiagra, and a triple chainring. It works very well for what I do, and I must say, with the 12-25 road cassette, there are times I need a triple. I believe that a compact double, especially if it were 10 or 11 speed with a mountain cassette should have the same gearing as my triple with road cassette. But there is something to consider. I was doing a group ride last week and for a stretch, I was riding along side a woman who was riding a Cannondale road bike with a compact double. On a long flat stretch of road, she continually shifted between her small and big chainrings. Apparently at a moderate pace on flats, she was right between the hardest gears on the small chainring and the easiest on the big one. I was right in the middle of the range on my road cassette and middle chainring, which allowed me to cruise long stretches with fewer shifts, and none using the left hand shifter. You need to test ride some bikes to see what works best for you.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:43 PM
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Just get the pink one! Kidding!

I'll address the triple versus double question. I've ridden both for years. These days you can accomplish the same gear range with either setup. I've ridden a triple with a 12-25 and a compact with a 12-27 and the range is almost identical. These days, a lot of compact doubles are spec'd with 12-32 cassettes, which provide very low gearing for steep hills.

To me, the value of the triple for a new rider is in that wonderful middle chainring (usually a 40 tooth). When mated with the rear cassette, it provides a wide range of gears in the typical speed range of a new rider who may average between 13 and 17 mph on the flats, as opposed to the compact setup, where you may find yourself frequently switching between the 34 and the 50 in that speed range, with a lot of cross-chaining (small chainring, small back cog; large chainring, large back cog). Cross-chaining causes more wear and tear on the drivetrain.

The downside of the triple (sometimes) is that it's a little more finicky to get tuned so it works perfectly.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:45 PM
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Of the bikes listed, the Giant Avail Composite 2 would give you the best bang for the buck IMHO. The added comfort of carbon (composite) for longer rides and a mix of 105 gives you what you're looking for. Take your time, compare the specs and do your research. It is confusing, but you'll get it narrowed down and pull the trigger eventually.
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Old 07-14-14, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by dstrong View Post
Just get the pink one! Kidding!

I'll address the triple versus double question. I've ridden both for years. These days you can accomplish the same gear range with either setup. I've ridden a triple with a 12-25 and a compact with a 12-27 and the range is almost identical. These days, a lot of compact doubles are spec'd with 12-32 cassettes, which provide very low gearing for steep hills.

To me, the value of the triple for a new rider is in that wonderful middle chainring (usually a 40 tooth). When mated with the rear cassette, it provides a wide range of gears in the typical speed range of a new rider who may average between 13 and 17 mph on the flats, as opposed to the compact setup, where you may find yourself frequently switching between the 34 and the 50 in that speed range, with a lot of cross-chaining (small chainring, small back cog; large chainring, large back cog). Cross-chaining causes more wear and tear on the drivetrain.

The downside of the triple (sometimes) is that it's a little more finicky to get tuned so it works perfectly.
That and anticipating long or steep hills and getting to the small chainring before running out of gears on the middle chainring. Once I had that Eureka moment early last season, the miles came a lot easier.
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Old 07-14-14, 06:25 PM
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I got my 2014 Felt Z5 for 1,349$ with carbon frame /105 components. Shop around to see the best deal.
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Old 07-14-14, 06:39 PM
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Get a part time job there, see how much you learn...
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Old 07-14-14, 06:45 PM
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Ride everything you like the looks of and focus on the one/ones that feel best. Buy the model you like and based on your budget get the best components you can. If I had to choose either/or I would go for better components over carbon. I began on a triple which allowed me to do things I would not have been able to otherwise but now have a compact and don't really miss it.
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Old 07-14-14, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by calliebear9 View Post
Is the frame material more important than the level of components? Is there a big difference between Tiagra and 105? Is there anything important to know about the difference between alum and carbon besides the ride will feel different?
I would focus on the component level more than the frame material. For your stated size/weight, I'd suggest the aluminum. I'm 215, down from 285, myself and while it may be unfounded, I still regard carbon bikes with caution. I would hate to spend $2000 and have the frame asplode under my big ass.

You would do well to shoot for 105 and hope for Ultegra in your price range. Tiagra isn't junk by any stretch of the imagination, but with your budget, you can get a nice setup and shouldn't have to settle for any Tiagra or Sora components. Be sure that you don't get fooled by the rear dťrailleur being a step-up from the rest of the components. That's a common strategy. While the RD's level is important, the shifters' level is more important, IMO, to the feel/functionality of the shifting at the end of the day.


Originally Posted by calliebear9 View Post
I read that for lower gears I would be better off with a Triple. Is that true and I should only target bikes that have triples? Or will a compact get me where I need to be?
A triple will give you 30 combinations (on a ten-speed drivetrain (10 cogs in the back)) while a two-ring setup up front (whether compact, semi-compact or standard or whatever) will give you 20. The actual range from the highest to lowest gear will actually be roughly the same (and either setup can be tweaked by customizing the cassette/cogs in the rear.) The different arrangements have plusses and minuses and I'm sure you could search out numerous threads on this forum discussing it into the ground. In short, though, a triple is going to give you smaller jumps between the gear ratios which means when you're rolling along and feel the need to shift up or down, the amount of difference between the gear you're in and the next gear will be small and the shift will be smoother than if you were in a double-up-front setup. The end result is that if you have rolling terrain in your area, you will likely end up shifting more often with a triple but you'll be able to always pick the gear that is most comfortable for you at a given moment to maintain your speed/cadence. With a double, you could end up having to sit in a less optimal gear and have to push a little harder (or softer) than you might wish to at that moment. Personally, I prefer a triple, but I live in a pretty hilly place and do a lot of climbing.


As has been pointed out, if you are tall enough to avoid the bikes made specifically for women, do so. With your budget, you ought to be able to get a very nice bike and all the necessary accessories.
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Old 07-14-14, 07:27 PM
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One more opinion: It sounds like you can get what you're looking for with the Lexa SLX. Slightly more upright position (that can be adjusted at the bike shop when they fit you), good components, and depending on how hilly an area you live in and how strong you are, you could go with either the double or triple on that bike. You could try a carbon frame to see if you notice the difference and if it's worth it to you. There's an endless debate between frame types but it seems that aluminum might take a little more abuse, carbon possibly more comfortable and lighter. Tuned properly, you probably won't notice a difference between Tiagra and 105 when you're riding. And you'll have more fun on a bike that you think looks really cool than one that was a great deal.
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Old 07-14-14, 07:28 PM
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I have a Jamis Quest Comp that I really like. The adjustable thread less stem system is neat, can move the stem up/down across an 80mm range. I like a more aggressive position, and as my gut shrinks, I can adjust things a bit easier.

I'm a pretty noob cyclist and really noob road cyclist, so my opinion isn't very informed.
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Old 07-14-14, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by I <3 Robots View Post
The fit of the frame should be the most important...not the material.

If you can get the 105...get it. I had Tiagra on my first bike. The finish and performance of the 105 will be a big step up from Tiagra.

Unless your are under 5'3"...don't limit yourself to womens specific frames.

You do not need a triple. Most "beginner" bikes are going to be equipped with 50/34 cranks and 11-32 cassettes...which will give you roughly the low range of a triple.
Beginner road bikes are better spec'ced than pro road bikes, that are useless for all-round riding! Unless you have strong muscles, you'll be thankful for an 11-32 cassette - which is a big help up hills - even if you have a compact crankset and triple cranks are no longer needed unless you plan to do extensive touring which is a subject for our dedicated forum on here.
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Old 07-14-14, 08:29 PM
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I am a woman, new to the sport, starting cycling 18mo ago. Lol, I've already bought three bikes, so I'm not an expert but I've been through the process. Like you, I didn't know too much about bikes. Now I know more but still not that much.

First, people can tell you to test ride a lot of bikes but for me that was very difficult on practical grounds- shops don't necessarily stock lots of WSD in a variety of frame sizes. And as a newby, it was hard for me to extrapolate from one bike to another- for example, riding a wrong size frame to understand the features of a bike, or riding a bike with better components than you'd purchase in order to test a frame. So on practical grounds, you may need to travel far & wide, or limit your test rides to the models you can find locally in your size.

Second, the most important feature of a bike is a frame size that fits, not whether it's a WSD or a "man's" bike. Two of my bikes are men's bikes and one is WSD. The big difference for me is that I had to swap out a bunch of stuff on my main squeeze, a men's BMC. Woman's saddle, seatpost with less offset, shorter stem, narrower bars, shorter cranks. Those changes really add up and you're less likely to need as many changes if you buy a WSD. So practically speaking, WSD may save you some $.

Third, my fitting in the LBS was terrible. My second fitting in a different LBS was more terrible. All of my fittings with my fitter have been excellent. So personally, I'd take whatever fitting the LBS gave me but I'd also set something aside for a session or two with a different fitter, just in case.

Good luck, any questions feel free.
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Old 07-14-14, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by dstrong View Post
I'll address the triple versus double question. I've ridden both for years. These days you can accomplish the same gear range with either setup. I've ridden a triple with a 12-25 and a compact with a 12-27 and the range is almost identical. These days, a lot of compact doubles are spec'd with 12-32 cassettes, which provide very low gearing for steep hills.

To me, the value of the triple for a new rider is in that wonderful middle chainring (usually a 40 tooth). When mated with the rear cassette, it provides a wide range of gears in the typical speed range of a new rider who may average between 13 and 17 mph on the flats, as opposed to the compact setup, where you may find yourself frequently switching between the 34 and the 50 in that speed range, with a lot of cross-chaining (small chainring, small back cog; large chainring, large back cog). Cross-chaining causes more wear and tear on the drivetrain.

The downside of the triple (sometimes) is that it's a little more finicky to get tuned so it works perfectly.
I totally agree; get the triple. The weight difference is minor, as is the tuning (at least for a good mechanic). I have a triple (52-42-30) with a 12-34 cassette, and almost always just leave it on the middle chain ring; that gives me a useful speed range of about 7-25mph. But the small chain ring is a lifesaver when I hit a steep hill, say 6-7%+. Those that have said (above) that you can use a wider range (more teeth on biggest cog) cassette with a compact double are correct, BUT you can use that same wider cassette with the triple and get an even lower overall gearing. And you eliminate the cross-chaining problem as well as switching back and forth often between the compact's two chain rings. It is not a big deal to have the cassette changed if need be. Worst case scenario is that you'd have to have the rear derailleur changed to accommodate a larger range. But if you decide later on that the compact crank isn't enough, changing to a triple later on is a big deal, definitely involving a new front derailleur and new brifter (brake-shifter).

And an aluminum bike is fine. Alberto Contador (in the Tour de France) may have wished for one today as his carbon frame failed on him and he had a nasty crash breaking his tibia and dropping him out of the race. : ( [he was one of the favorites to win]

Edit: Latest story on Contador's broken bike is that it was the spare that was broken, and that was done by hitting a car or somesuch, without Contador on it. In any case, an aluminum bike is fine, and I like mine (although that one is my hybrid, not my road bike which is Titanium).

Best of luck, Dick

Last edited by dicktill; 07-14-14 at 08:59 PM. Reason: received new news report ...
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Old 07-14-14, 08:51 PM
  #20  
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Get Giant avail composite 2. Have a Female friend who got the same bike January, trained for MS150 in 4 months and loves the bike.
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Old 07-14-14, 09:11 PM
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In addition to Dicktill's comments about triple gearing's advantages, on many triples (those with a 74mm BCD) the inner ring can be swapped for one as small as 24 teeth allowing extremely low gearing. The smallest inner ring for a road compact is a 33 tooth.

In my opinion, unless you live somewhere that's dead flat, as a new rider with some extra weight you will not regret getting a triple. As you improve, you can simple ignore the extra gears or easily convert to a double. As noted above, double to triple is not nearly as easy though.
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Old 07-14-14, 09:12 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by calliebear9 View Post
I am looking to get a road bike. It will be my first. I have had my Jamis Coda Sport for over a year and I know at the end of the summer I want to make the switch to a road bike so I can keep adding miles. I like my current bike, but I want to go faster and further and I think I need to upgrade to do that. I find bike stores a little bit similar to car dealers in that there are a lot of bits and pieces of the bikes (or cars) that I don’t really understand not having been brought up around them. So I prepare myself by researching and then asking a bunch of questions. But, unfortunately, I don’t know what I don’t know. And I want to ask the right questions when I get to the store.

The LBS that I frequent carries Trek and Giant. I stopped by this weekend and tried out a Trek Lexa SL as I wanted to see if I even liked the feel of a road bike with drop handlebars. Surprisingly I did. So after the ride, my internet research began.

Based on my Local Bike Stores in the near area I have brand options of Trek, Specialized, Giant, and going further out I have Felt, Jamis, Scott, Raleigh and Bianchi. I like the LBS I have been going to, and as I said, they carry Trek and Giant, so based on convenience I would love to stick with them, but at the same time, I want to find the best bike and can always switch for service. I want to stay at or under $2k all in - so including the pedals and saddle-bag, etc. Does a bike purchase usually include a fitting?

I read online that I should try to maximize my components in terms of quality for my dollar. So I had focused on Shimano 105 as I didn’t want entry level and wanted to grow into the bike. I noticed that I can get a aluminum bike with 105 components in my price range or I can try a carbon/composite bike with lesser components (Tiagra). I can’t seem to get a carbon with 105. Is the frame material more important than the level of components? Is there a big difference between Tiagra and 105? Is there anything important to know about the difference between alum and carbon besides the ride will feel different?

Secondly I am worried about gearing. I am big girl- let’s just say that. I need the low gears to haul my butt up a hill. That being said, I am not climbing any mountains any time soon. I read that for lower gears I would be better off with a Triple. Is that true and I should only target bikes that have triples? Or will a compact get me where I need to be?

I want a bike that is a relaxed fit, so not a racing bike with aggressive geometry, but rather an endurance bike that is designed to be comfortable on for hours.

So right now I am thinking of checking out:
Trek Lexa SLX- it has the Shimano 105 but is alum, is available in compact and triple
Giant Avail 1
Giant Avail Composite 2
Trek Silque- has Tiagra parts but an composite/carbon frame and is getting pricey (btw I hate the name Silque)
Trek Domane- gets pricier, but seems to be more relaxed than the Silque
Trek Madone- pricey and I think too aggressive
Specialized Ruby Sport- is this geometry too aggressive?

I also threw in the Raleigh Capri 3.0 and the Bianchi Impulso Dama, but I need to go to shops I haven’t been to for those and I am not as familiar with the brands so I am not sure I want to try it.

Any advice is appreciated particularly related to my two questions.
A double is fine. The Lexa, Madone, and Domane all came with 11-28 cassettes, which will work fine. My wife just went from a Lexa SLX to a Madone 4.5 with Ultegra. She picked up the Madone new as a 2013 close out model for under $1900 with a fitting. She was lucky that a dealer close had a 2013 left in her size. She absolutely loved her Lexa SLX, and she decided since she was riding so much that it would be nice to get I to the comfort of carbon. It came down to a 2013 Domane 4.3 with 105 or the 2013 Madone 4.5 with the Ultegra. In the end the comfort features of the Domane didn't do enough for her and she liked the Madone better with the nicer components, wheels, and tires. The LBS set her Madone up very close to the way her Lexa was configured. They even switched out the length of the stem to make it perfect.

So, with that being said, the Lexa SLX with 105 is a great bike!!! You would love it, my wife's was a 2011, so it did not have the ISO Decoupler like the newer SLX, Domane, and Silque have. I always look for closeouts first, if nothing is available, then I would go with the Lexa. You need to test ride a options though!!! Good luck!!
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Old 07-14-14, 09:44 PM
  #23  
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Keep in mind bikes don't have genders. OP didn't say what her height was but if you're taller than 5'4" take a look at a man's bike. You will want to ride a diamond frame road bike.

Parts can be swapped out and everything can be fitted to how you like to ride by a bike shop.
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Old 07-14-14, 10:04 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by rms13 View Post
You don't need a triple to have low gear. My bike has a compact crankset with 50/34 chain ring and 11-32 cassette. So I can get as low as 34/32 which is 27.9 gear inches. If you have a triple with a 30 tooth ring and 11-28 cassette which is common for a triple you get 30/28 or 28.1 gear inches.
+1 A few years ago I bought a bicycle with a triple because I live at the foot a huge hill.... with much of the city on the other side. But I have recently purchased a new bike with a compact crankset and I love it. Nothing wrong with the triple! But the compact works fine for climbing.
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Old 07-14-14, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
+1 A few years ago I bought a bicycle with a triple because I live at the foot a huge hill.... with much of the city on the other side. But I have recently purchased a new bike with a compact crankset and I love it. Nothing wrong with the triple! But the compact works fine for climbing.
All depends on how strong your legs/lungs/heart are, and how much weight you have to get up the hill, and how steep that hill is ... some of us need gear in the low 20's, like my 30 chain ring to 34 cog (= 23.2 gear-inches).

Regards, Dick
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