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Who here rides a new steel road bike?

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Who here rides a new steel road bike?

Old 09-28-14, 08:57 AM
  #51  
Drummerboy1975
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
And? Do some research... The Mr. pink fits most all of these specs, except for discs.
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Old 09-28-14, 08:58 AM
  #52  
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Steel , Raleigh 2015 are mentionable . To truly appreciate a steel frame is to see one being built , there are classes on this subject , in my area Pacific NW , Paul Brodie .
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Old 09-28-14, 08:58 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Nice list, but not comprehensive. Southwest Frame Builders in Dallas, TX is not on it, and I'm sure many others as well. This is a very good start, however. By the way, depending upon where in Arkansas you are, Southwest in Dallas may be a good choice for you. When I had them repaint my 1990 Romic 531 frame, I drove up from Houston for the day to drop the frame off and discuss all the details with them. That was very effective toward getting what I wanted. See below:

Thanks, I'll look them up.
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Old 09-28-14, 09:01 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Drummerboy1975 View Post
Oh, and it will need to be custom painted House of Colors Sunset Kandy Tangerine Orange.
How close is that LeMond Washoe I posted?
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Old 09-28-14, 09:01 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by Drummerboy1975 View Post
Here's the list I was wanting. I'm looking into a custom build. Here's what I want... I want a steel frame road bike, that can handle up to, at least a 32c tire for gravel, disc brakes, not worried about fenders or luggage rack brazons, not a relaxed geometry, but also not doing cries either, somewhere middle of the road. Threaded BB is preferred, a carbon fork, uses builder does his/her own very nice custom fork. Oh, and it will need to be custom painted House of Colors Sunset Kandy Tangerine Orange.

Directory Of Custom American Handmade Road Bike Frame Builders | CYCLOPHILIAC - American Made Cycling
Have you looked into Co-motion? I have one of there tandems and the Espresso road bike. Great riding bikes. The Klatch model sounds like it would fit what you want.
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Old 09-28-14, 09:42 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post

Sweet. The red brakes are the touch! Candy apple red and gold works, too, not at all the muscle car cliché I might have thought.
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Old 09-28-14, 10:03 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by Drummerboy1975 View Post
And? Do some research... The Mr. pink fits most all of these specs, except for discs.
Does All City make a Mr. Moving Target, because that'd be perfect for you.
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Old 09-28-14, 10:28 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by Drummerboy1975 View Post
I've been riding a full carbon Fuji for three years now. I love the nice, soft, squishy ride, but that's the problme. I want something with more response.
THere are lots of reasons to get steel but avoiding soft, squishy ride of carbon isn't one. Most carbon frames are very stiff and certainly don't feel squishy. That's why all top pros ride carbon and some sprinters keep coming back asking for greater stiffness.

The benefit of carbon fiber is it can be made to exhibit any characteristic. My carbon fiber bikes are substantially stiffer than steel.
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Old 09-28-14, 04:10 PM
  #59  
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This thread is quite extraordinary. Carbon squishy? Carbon offering responsiveness that steel cannot match? Carbon stiffer than steel? Custom builds are a crap shoot?

None of these generalisations are correct. i have steel bikes that are phenomenally stiff, at the expense of being somewhat heavy. I have a carbon bike (Giant TCR) that is plenty stiff. The "responsiveness" of these bikes is governed by their geometry, not their frame material. I have a custom steel bike - columbus spirit frame, carbon forks - that is light and fast, handles better than my TCR, and is a little less stiff.

A decent framebuilder will build you a steel bike that offers the stiffness (or lack of it) and other characteristics that you want. But it sounds as if the issue here is not frame material, but merely finding a bike that you like.
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Old 09-28-14, 05:12 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Sweet. The red brakes are the touch! Candy apple red and gold works, too, not at all the muscle car cliché I might have thought.
Thanks. Candy Apple Red gets its punch from a tranlucent red layer over a gold base layer. The gold you see is the same as the base layer. We just painted the whole bike gold, then masked off the panel and head tube and went over the rest with the red. That turned out to be both cost effective and very good looking too. Sometimes ideas just work out right.
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Old 09-28-14, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
This thread is quite extraordinary. Carbon squishy? Carbon offering responsiveness that steel cannot match? Carbon stiffer than steel? Custom builds are a crap shoot?

None of these generalisations are correct. i have steel bikes that are phenomenally stiff, at the expense of being somewhat heavy. I have a carbon bike (Giant TCR) that is plenty stiff. The "responsiveness" of these bikes is governed by their geometry, not their frame material. I have a custom steel bike - columbus spirit frame, carbon forks - that is light and fast, handles better than my TCR, and is a little less stiff.

A decent framebuilder will build you a steel bike that offers the stiffness (or lack of it) and other characteristics that you want. But it sounds as if the issue here is not frame material, but merely finding a bike that you like.
I think you are being a bit harsh regarding some understandable rhetorical shortcuts. Sure steel can be made as stiff as desired, but at what weight and comfort penalties. And we have already established that OP doesn't understand the meaning of responsiveness or at least isn't clarifying what he means by it. Finally you don't have to spend much time here to read the many posts about custom frames gone wrong. Not saying it is a failing of the builder necessarily. It could easily be just a faiilure of communication. What you have observed in this thread should convince you of this possibility.
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Old 09-28-14, 05:54 PM
  #62  
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Ride a steel frame most days. Cost me a grand total of $350 bucks. New.
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Old 09-28-14, 05:58 PM
  #63  
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God get that Judge Judy clip out of my mind.
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Old 09-28-14, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
I think you are being a bit harsh regarding some understandable rhetorical shortcuts. Sure steel can be made as stiff as desired, but at what weight and comfort penalties. And we have already established that OP doesn't understand the meaning of responsiveness or at least isn't clarifying what he means by it. Finally you don't have to spend much time here to read the many posts about custom frames gone wrong. Not saying it is a failing of the builder necessarily. It could easily be just a faiilure of communication. What you have observed in this thread should convince you of this possibility.
Great post Robert. I've mentioned before I'm a victim of the custom Kool-Aid. Custom is great for people with unusual body dimensions where regular geometry and available parts sizing won't work. But for the vast majority, it's a waste of money in my opinion. One can usually find an off the shelf frame with desired characteristics by searching and asking. Even if that's not possible, the chances of effective communication between the rider and builder is one big chance.
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Old 09-29-14, 04:21 AM
  #65  
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The on going love affair with steel while perhaps not totally baffling is a throwback to another time.

Do you guys remember Euro who was a pretty controversial guy here who I believe got banned a long time ago and hasn't returned...in least any form I have recognized.

He was from 'Europe' of course and a knowledgeable bike guy and he said that infatuation with steel was largely a US thing and nobody in Europe rode steel bikes or if they were around they were old bikes. If Europeans weren't on carbon than they were on Al. Reasons are manifold but basically Al can be hydroformed to create asymmetric tube sections for differential stiffness in opposing planes and of course Al is lighter. If you check with Bianchi for example, they didn't sell a single steel bike in Europe and only one or two steel models in US, of which I used to own one. If you look at Specialized, Giant, Trek, pretty much all the big guys, none of them sell a steel bike or if they do it is an outlier compared to Al which is ubiquitous.

My view is a slightly wider tire will tune out any road harshness based upon Al especially today with the new Al bike designs. Many say a CAAD10 or Specialized Secteur rivals the comfort level of carbon and without a ride penalty and of course Al can be made very stiff as well, not because of its inherently low modulus but rather selection of tube sections that create stiffness. Also Al doesn't rust. I just don't see the love for steel now and I have owned 30 of them.
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Old 09-29-14, 04:30 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by StanSeven View Post
Great post Robert. I've mentioned before I'm a victim of the custom Kool-Aid. Custom is great for people with unusual body dimensions where regular geometry and available parts sizing won't work. But for the vast majority, it's a waste of money in my opinion. One can usually find an off the shelf frame with desired characteristics by searching and asking. Even if that's not possible, the chances of effective communication between the rider and builder is one big chance.
This and many will even choose a custom frame if they have rather ordinary body proportions because they believe they need a custom geometry because they can't get comfortable on a traditional frame. These people basically never learned the tenants of good fit which is largely a game of opposites for the unknowing. I recently fit a rider at my club. We are identically sized in height, leg and arm width. He has owned 5 different frames in the last 3 years searching for this holy grail of fit and couldn't have been more off in spite of many local fittings. Got him set up and he thinks I am the greatest man alive. I told him that when we ride, we know natively whether a fit is right or not. What happens with many is they try a few different combinations but quit searching because they just can't nail their fit. They basically quit before they learn what a good fit is and why. Really no different than getting good at anything that isn't easy. But custom frames are generally not needed except for very small or NBA size guys/girls.
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Old 09-29-14, 06:42 AM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
I just don't see the love for steel now and I have owned 30 of them.
I am a recreational rider who is probably one of the better/stronger riders in my club's B ride. I'm not one of those guys who can ride a bike around the block and tell you that it's stiffer, quicker, etc. than anything else. I was riding an AL Masi Gran Criterium w/CF fork & rear in a size 58. It was never the right size for me although I had it set up so that I was pretty comfortable with it. In traditional measurement I should really be on a 55-56 frame. Last year I was encouraged by a friend who is an industry rep to go to a particular LBS for a fitting. It made all the difference. This guy made the bike fit amazingly well. At the beginning of this year a club member was selling a Guru Sidero (steel) w/SRAM Rival and Mavic Elites in a size 55. The bike had been ridden twice. It was a $2400 frame and probably a $3400 bike as it sat. Wanted $1200. I grabbed it. Been riding it all season and absolutely love it. I should mention that fully equipped to ride each bike weighs exactly 19 lbs. To your points....Really I can't tell the difference in ride between them. The Masi feels longer, I think. If the Masi was a 55 I would never have gotten another bike. The biggest difference has been all about the tires and psi. The guy who fit me to the Masi also fit me to the Guru. Should mention he didn't charge me to do it. Do I need a custom frame? Doubtful. I'm your average guy at 5'9 (down from 5'10 1/2") and 180 lbs with a 32 1/2" inseam. Have lost a little reach over the years. Custom? I don't see why. Steel, CF, AL? All good to me. Now, about saddles...........
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Old 09-29-14, 07:43 AM
  #68  
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The truth about (me and ) steel:

On the one hand I have owned steel bikes continuously since 1983. That includes two custom built Romics and a Ritchey steel Breakaway. In fact I just recently had the remaining Romic repainted and fully refurbished as many of you know from the pictures I have posted. I love the redone Romic and wouldn't want to part with it under any circumstances despite having carbon and titanium as well. And back in the '80s I also had experience with glued Trek aluminum. The aluminum is gone, but the steel remains.

Sounds simple right. You would think me a steel-is-real guy. Not so fast, because on the other hand, I redid the Romic with modern 10 speed parts, threadless steeerer, and a carbon fork. I only ride it on special occasions and then mostly just to show it off. My go-to rides are the Giant TCR Advanced carbon and, to a lesser extent, the Everti Falcon titanium. As much as I like the Romic, I recognize it doesn't do the job nearly as well at the Giant and the Everti. If it hadn't been mine forever, I probably wouldn't care about it at all. If I hadn't refurbished it as a labor of love and hobby project, I don't think I would have kept it unless there had been nothing else to do with it. Truth is, my love for the Romic is all about nostalgia, the familiarity of long association, shared history, and the pride of having done a good job of refurbishing it. The rest of the steel-is-real stuff just doesn't impress me.

Ride what you like, and like what you ride. Just don't imagine (my opinion, my advice) that any bike on today's market can beat the performance potential of carbon fiber, however you define that. I ride the steel, and I ride the Ti, but I know that "crabon" is king.
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Old 09-29-14, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
The truth about (me and ) steel:

On the one hand I have owned steel bikes continuously since 1983. That includes two custom built Romics and a Ritchey steel Breakaway. In fact I just recently had the remaining Romic repainted and fully refurbished as many of you know from the pictures I have posted. I love the redone Romic and wouldn't want to part with it under any circumstances despite having carbon and titanium as well. And back in the '80s I also had experience with glued Trek aluminum. The aluminum is gone, but the steel remains.

Sounds simple right. You would think me a steel-is-real guy. Not so fast, because on the other hand, I redid the Romic with modern 10 speed parts, threadless steeerer, and a carbon fork. I only ride it on special occasions and then mostly just to show it off. My go-to rides are the Giant TCR Advanced carbon and, to a lesser extent, the Everti Falcon titanium. As much as I like the Romic, I recognize it doesn't do the job nearly as well at the Giant and the Everti. If it hadn't been mine forever, I probably wouldn't care about it at all. If I hadn't refurbished it as a labor of love and hobby project, I don't think I would have kept it unless there had been nothing else to do with it. Truth is, my love for the Romic is all about nostalgia, the familiarity of long association, shared history, and the pride of having done a good job of refurbishing it. The rest of the steel-is-real stuff just doesn't impress me.

Ride what you like, and like what you ride. Just don't imagine (my opinion, my advice) that any bike on today's market can beat the performance potential of carbon fiber, however you define that. I ride the steel, and I ride the Ti, but I know that "crabon" is king.
And keep in mind Robert, you are speaking to a very small audience of steel owners that always come out of the closet when steel is mentioned. These luddites congregate on the 41 only and why it is virtually impossible to find a steel bike on the road except one being ridden by a bearded guy in saddles with panniers.
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Old 09-29-14, 08:48 AM
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Rode my new Steve Rex custom steel bike on Saturday's Knoxville Double Century, 204 miles, 14,908'. I had it made specifically for longer rides like double centuries and it did not disappoint.

Bike Ride Profile | 2014 Knoxville Double Century near Vacaville | Times and Records | Strava
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Old 10-01-14, 07:26 AM
  #71  
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I'm thinking of having a custom bike built that will put all of these arguments to rest.

It will have a CF triangle, Ti seat and chain stays, aluminum lugs and a steal fork.

And for good measure, wooden hooped wheel set with hubs made from Nasa Space Shuttle material.

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Old 10-01-14, 07:47 AM
  #72  
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I like the idea of getting a used steel frame and building the bike up yourself. I ride an older Lemond Tourmalet 853, and the ride is fantastic.
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Old 10-01-14, 09:29 AM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
And keep in mind Robert, you are speaking to a very small audience of steel owners that always come out of the closet when steel is mentioned. These luddites congregate on the 41 only and why it is virtually impossible to find a steel bike on the road except one being ridden by a bearded guy in saddles with panniers.
You're "very wrong". As usual.
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Old 10-01-14, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Drummerboy1975 View Post
I'm thinking of having a custom bike built that will put all of these arguments to rest.

It will have a CF triangle, Ti seat and chain stays, aluminum lugs and a steal fork.

And for good measure, wooden hooped wheel set with hubs made from Nasa Space Shuttle material.
You forgot the bamboo.
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Old 10-01-14, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
You forgot the bamboo.
And the magnesium.

Personally, I'd do a carbon fork (weight loss, vibration damping), AL downtube, BB shell and chain stays (stiffeness and power transfer), steel tt and seat stays (for the ride, man, the $#&^ing ride) and magnesium seat and head tube (in case I crashed into a ravine where people couldn't see me I could scrape some off and use it for a super bright signal fire). Many of my wheels already have White Industry or DA hubs so I already got the Ti covered.

I'd use the bamboo in a steamer to make some pork buns after the ride. Oh, and #@$% the wood.
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