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Best option for a road bike for the wife

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Best option for a road bike for the wife

Old 11-04-14, 09:36 PM
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Best option for a road bike for the wife

I have zero experience with road bikes and wife is wanting to get into it. We went to the LBS and they put her on a 52cm Trek Lexa, then had her demo a Trek Silque SLX which is above what we are wanting to spend at this time. At this point the two things we have been considering is buying a new Lexa or, I found a "2009 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD, Shimano Ultegra and 105 components and a 27 speed drivetrain. The bike has around 40 miles on it so it is in like new condition" that i believe i can buy for about $1000 and im not sure if that is a decent buy? So should we buy the new Lexa, buy the Madone or shop other brands? Thanks in advance for the advice!
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Old 11-04-14, 09:40 PM
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$1000 is a lot to start out riding with no experience, in my opinion. Going used is definitely not a bad option, but I think you could get her a $600 used/new bike that will do her about the same. Use the other money to get jerseys, spare tubes, pumps, bike computer, and a lot of accessories. This is what I did, I started out on a hybrid actually for about $500.
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Old 11-04-14, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by cjaj70 View Post
I have zero experience with road bikes and wife is wanting to get into it. We went to the LBS and they put her on a 52cm Trek Lexa.......... At this point the two things we have been considering is buying a new Lexa or, I found a "2009 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD,.... i can buy for about $1000. So should we buy the new Lexa, buy the Madone or shop other brands? Thanks in advance for the advice!
The Lexa is a nice bike.... why didn't you just take it home? Did the wife not fall in love with it? As a cyclist sometimes finding a comfortable bike... or even one in the right color is important.

Was/is the Madone (or ANY other bike) the correct size for your wife. If it doesn't fit and feel right it's a bad buy at any price.

You should keep looking. Your wife needs to know when she has found the right bike. Stay with looking at the local bicycle shops. She should test ride every road bike she can find in her size.
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Old 11-04-14, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Bunyanderman View Post
$1000 is a lot to start out riding with no experience, in my opinion. Going used is definitely not a bad option, but I think you could get her a $600 used/new bike that will do her about the same. Use the other money to get jerseys, spare tubes, pumps, bike computer, and a lot of accessories. This is what I did, I started out on a hybrid actually for about $500.
Listen to this guy.
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Old 11-04-14, 09:52 PM
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Used makes sense. But most importantly, whatever you get, make sure it fits. Nothing gets parked permanently sooner than an ill-fitting bike.
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Old 11-04-14, 09:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
The Lexa is a nice bike.... why didn't you just take it home? Did the wife not fall in love with it? As a cyclist sometimes finding a comfortable bike... or even one in the right color is important.

Was/is the Madone (or ANY other bike) the correct size for your wife. If it doesn't fit and feel right it's a bad buy at any price.

You should keep looking. Your wife needs to know when she has found the right bike. Stay with looking at the local bicycle shops. She should test ride every road bike she can find in her size.
The Madone is a 52 but would not let her buy it without riding it. I wasnt sure what the best option was and have always been a fan of buying used if i could find something in really good condition.
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Old 11-04-14, 10:00 PM
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OK, maybe buying used works for you but does it work for your wife?

A totally under-rated factor in new bike purchasing is the wow-factor. Is she enamored enough to want to ride it all the time or will it sit in the garage? Women shop differently from men - don't under value her (maybe unspoken) wants and needs.
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Old 11-04-14, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by cjaj70 View Post
..... I wasnt sure what the best option was ....
And... without a crystal ball.... there is never anyway to tell. IMHO there is no logical, rational, formula for determining what is the best bicycle to buy. Thank God we cyclists can be attracted to and form emotional bonds with these bicycles.
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Old 11-04-14, 10:05 PM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
OK, maybe buying used works for you but does it work for your wife?

A totally under-rated factor in new bike purchasing is the wow-factor. Is she enamored enough to want to ride it all the time or will it sit in the garage? Women shop differently from men - don't under value her (maybe unspoken) wants and needs.
Buying new is not a big factor to her. She likes the idea of getting a carbon frame bike but is unwilling to spend the money to buy a new one.
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Old 11-04-14, 10:09 PM
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Then go for the madone, if she likes it. They're nice bikes.

One caveat that may or may not matter to you - used bikes carry no warranty whatsoever from the manufacturer. My last two bikes have been used carbon frames so it doesn't bother me but apparently some people need the comfort of a warranty.
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Old 11-04-14, 10:33 PM
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My wife just got into road bikes recently too and she test rode what feels like a gazillion bikes before she found the right one. A good LBS is key. She went in knowing she wanted something with a more relaxed, comfortable geometry as opposed to a full on race bike and the LBS owner spent a lot of time just watching her form and fit on the different bikes she took out. She narrowed her options to a few WSD bikes - FELT f75 (too aggressive), Specialized Dolce (too cramped), Giant Avail (felt really good but entry level components), Trek Emonda (more comfortable and much quicker than the Avail).

After a really long discussion with our LBS, it came down to the price difference between the 2014 Avail ($700) or the 2015 Trek Emonda ($2100). The LBS owner asked her a question which helped her decide between the two: Are you looking for a bike to enjoy short term, outgrow and upgrade in a year? Or are you looking for a bike you could happily ride and keep for several years? This is something you and your wife might want to consider.

In the end, our LBS had her try on a full carbon 2014 Trek Domane 4.3 WSD which was right in between the Avail and the Emonda price wise, but once the wife took it out for a ride, we all knew that was the one she fit in the most perfect. She parks it next to her side of the bed at night.
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Old 11-04-14, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by cjaj70 View Post
Buying new is not a big factor to her. She likes the idea of getting a carbon frame bike but is unwilling to spend the money to buy a new one.
A good carbon frame bike is going to be about $2500, anything under that and you get sub par drive train, brakes, and warranty. I really doubt she will take any benefit to the carbon bike starting out. She might crash it being inexperienced, so there goes the bike. Carbon is really smooth, you can get a used carbon for less than 1k, but take risks doing so. There would not be any speed difference to her from a $500-600 bike used/new compared to the $2500 bikes starting out with no experience. The $2500 bikes are really smooth, shift amazing, and usually have amazing warranties.
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Old 11-05-14, 01:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Bunyanderman View Post
$1000 is a lot to start out riding with no experience, in my opinion. Going used is definitely not a bad option, but I think you could get her a $600 used/new bike that will do her about the same. Use the other money to get jerseys, spare tubes, pumps, bike computer, and a lot of accessories. This is what I did, I started out on a hybrid actually for about $500.
On the other hand, if she's sure that she wants to get into riding, spending $1000 or more for a good bike that she'll enjoy riding and that won't immediately need to be upgraded as she rides more can be well worth it. That's assuming that it's financially feasible.

In my case, I knew I wanted to get into riding. I wanted to have as much fun as my husband had when he took up bicycling to have something to do while I was away at grad school. When we got my bike, he wisely had me get something nicer than what he had (and it cost more than $1000). I loved riding it (and still do)--four years, two more bikes, and a bicycling trip together to the Italian Alps and Dolomites later, I consider that initial investment in a bike that was better than my novice skills merited to be money well spent.

Though looking at that list, it would have been cheaper to get me a lousy bike that I never rode... But way less fun.
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Old 11-05-14, 01:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
And... without a crystal ball.... there is never anyway to tell. IMHO there is no logical, rational, formula for determining what is the best bicycle to buy. Thank God we cyclists can be attracted to and form emotional bonds with these bicycles.
This whole post could apply to people as well as bicycles.
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Old 11-05-14, 01:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Snakepit View Post
My wife just got into road bikes recently too and she test rode what feels like a gazillion bikes before she found the right one. A good LBS is key. She went in knowing she wanted something with a more relaxed, comfortable geometry as opposed to a full on race bike and the LBS owner spent a lot of time just watching her form and fit on the different bikes she took out. She narrowed her options to a few WSD bikes - FELT f75 (too aggressive), Specialized Dolce (too cramped), Giant Avail (felt really good but entry level components), Trek Emonda (more comfortable and much quicker than the Avail).

After a really long discussion with our LBS, it came down to the price difference between the 2014 Avail ($700) or the 2015 Trek Emonda ($2100). The LBS owner asked her a question which helped her decide between the two: Are you looking for a bike to enjoy short term, outgrow and upgrade in a year? Or are you looking for a bike you could happily ride and keep for several years? This is something you and your wife might want to consider.

In the end, our LBS had her try on a full carbon 2014 Trek Domane 4.3 WSD which was right in between the Avail and the Emonda price wise, but once the wife took it out for a ride, we all knew that was the one she fit in the most perfect. She parks it next to her side of the bed at night.
Awww. And I mean that in the best possible way. I congratulate you- and her- on your patience while she found the right bike and wish both of you many happy miles.
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Old 11-05-14, 02:38 AM
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The Domane is a great bike, very well recommended.
I really like mine.
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Old 11-05-14, 05:05 AM
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I sympathise with your dilemma. For years I have been suggesting my wife get a road bike with no success - she loves her custom built Roberts tourer and Raleigh Silhouette mixte.

Then, we met a neighbour who had started cycling for finess, used an MTB and had just swapped for a road bike. He raved about it and suddenly my wife was all "You know, I think I should get a road bike" !!!!!!!!

So we test rode a few (she's 5'1 so fit was critical) looked around for used but then decided to go new and went to get a £600 aluminium road bike. We ended up instead getting a full carbon Orbea Orca Dama, with upgraded Mavic wheels!!!

She loves it. (I didn't doubt she would).

Rule of thumb - listen to what your wife wants. If she is happy with used (and you worry she may not get into it), then buy used. If she gets a buzz out of new, then go for that, ladies road bikes are very marketable. If she chooses just based on the colour so be it

I know that can be difficult - women can be difficult to read (I still don't understand Sandra after 30+ years!)

If the STOP sign had been designed by a woman it would just say "You should know what I want you to do!"

I hope you get it sorted. Road biking together is a real bonding experience
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Old 11-05-14, 06:37 AM
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Sorry, I only clicked on this thread because when I read the title I thought you were trying to trade your wife for a road bike.


My advice in that situation is to take the first offer that comes along...don't hold out for carbon.
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Old 11-05-14, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by thump55 View Post
Sorry, I only clicked on this thread because when I read the title I thought you were trying to trade your wife for a road bike.


My advice in that situation is to take the first offer that comes along...don't hold out for carbon.
I wish I'd listened to this advice many moons ago,
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Old 11-05-14, 07:00 AM
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If your wife wants to get into racing, then the lexa and the 2009 madone are good buys. Plus the madone is a good deal. I'd seriously consider an alternative. The biggest factor in whether a bike is comfortable for the long haul is the tires. Everything else being equal, a slightly larger tire run at a little lower pressure means you have a bike that is more comfortable and will handle better over different types of terrain. The alternative I'd look at would be a cross bike. You can get it with slicks. A good quality cross bike will be light and comfortable and will ride well over most any type of surface you are likely to encounter.
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Old 11-05-14, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by chewa View Post
I sympathise with your dilemma. For years I have been suggesting my wife get a road bike with no success - she loves her custom built Roberts tourer and Raleigh Silhouette mixte.

Then, we met a neighbour who had started cycling for finess, used an MTB and had just swapped for a road bike. He raved about it and suddenly my wife was all "You know, I think I should get a road bike" !!!!!!!!

So we test rode a few (she's 5'1 so fit was critical) looked around for used but then decided to go new and went to get a £600 aluminium road bike. We ended up instead getting a full carbon Orbea Orca Dama, with upgraded Mavic wheels!!!

She loves it. (I didn't doubt she would).

Rule of thumb - listen to what your wife wants. If she is happy with used (and you worry she may not get into it), then buy used. If she gets a buzz out of new, then go for that, ladies road bikes are very marketable. If she chooses just based on the colour so be it

I know that can be difficult - women can be difficult to read (I still don't understand Sandra after 30+ years!)

If the STOP sign had been designed by a woman it would just say "You should know what I want you to do!"

I hope you get it sorted. Road biking together is a real bonding experience
I may have to get a road bike as well then, lol. I spend my time on a mtb at the moment.
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Old 11-05-14, 08:01 AM
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To my wife the look of the bike was probably the most important thing to her. Actually the look was about the only thing she was concerned with.
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Old 11-05-14, 08:08 AM
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Look at other brands, at other shops. Don't just stay on one brand, try smaller brands too or brands you dont normally find.
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Old 11-05-14, 08:18 AM
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Buy whatever makes her most happy.

My wife started with a 2006 $1600 Specialized Roubaix. We then upgraded the 9-speed 105 parts to Sram Force and upgraded the wheels to a CK R45s with Kinlin rims. Then we swapped that over to a 2011 Tarmac SL3 Pro frameset. Then Specialized provided her a 2013 Amira Pro, and that is what she is riding now.

She also is on her second cross bike. The first was a Cannondale CX-9 and now she is on a 2014 Specialized Crux.

On another note, I would suggest staying away from Triple chainrings up front - the 27 speed bike you mentioned has a triple - and I would avoid 9-speed set ups - also on the Trek you mentioned. Shoot for something that has at least 10 gears in the back, 11 would be better and a compact double chain ring up front.

I suggest this for two reasons:
1. Doubles shift way better than triples. Your wife will appreciate the easier shifting of the double.
2. Resale value on an 11-speed bike will be better than on a 10-speed bike, which will be better than on a 9-speed bike. Since your wife is new to this and wants a new bike, factoring in the possible resale value is probably a good idea.
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Old 11-05-14, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Ramona_W View Post
This whole post could apply to people as well as bicycles.
+1 Yes it could!

Originally Posted by thump55 View Post
Sorry, I only clicked on this thread because when I read the title I thought you were trying to trade your wife for a road bike.
Like anyone would trade a perfectly good road bicycle... for someone used wife.
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