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What do you do with your CO2?

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What do you do with your CO2?

Old 12-30-14, 03:59 PM
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Ben I.
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What do you do with your CO2?

I recently decided to get a CO2 inflator and am planning on putting it and a couple cartridges in my saddle bag. I usually keep the bag on my bike year round, once it gets cold I hang the bike in the garage (unheated). I live in the Chicagoland area and I'm wondering if the CO2 cartridges will be okay left in the garage year round, exposed to very hot weather in summer and very cold in winter and don't want them bursting or anything.

Is it okay to leave the cartridges outside or should I keep them inside and just be sure to bring them with on rides?

Thanks for the advice!
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Old 12-30-14, 04:09 PM
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Yes. There is no natural climate environment where you are located that will harm them.
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Old 12-30-14, 04:25 PM
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Make sure you leave the pressure relief valve open.
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Old 12-30-14, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Elvo View Post
Make sure you leave the pressure relief valve open.
Not sure what you mean since CO2 cartridges for inflator don't have those. I used to work at a paintball field so I think you might be thinking of other CO2 tanks that have valves to relief pressure if they get too hot?
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Old 12-30-14, 04:50 PM
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Or maybe he was pulling your leg. Hard to tell.
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Old 12-30-14, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Ben I. View Post
Not sure what you mean since CO2 cartridges for inflator don't have those. I used to work at a paintball field so I think you might be thinking of other CO2 tanks that have valves to relief pressure if they get too hot?
I think he might be yanking your valve...
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Old 12-30-14, 05:30 PM
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I love throwing my CO2 canisters in my kitchen garbage, then putting it out to go to the landfill while I turn on every light in the house, let all the water taps run, and yell "FTW!!" until I'm hoarse. Then I get a prescription sore throat med with "natural" endorphins which propel my cycling performances to ever higher highs.

Yes, I am f***ing awesome, thankyouverymuch.
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Old 12-30-14, 06:49 PM
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I leave mine in the garage in Texas through the summer - never had an explosion.
As for the environmental impact, they are made from steel, the most recycled and one of the most abundant materials on earth. In a landfill, they basically turn to rust in short order. If it bothers you, you can also turn them in to be recycled - any scrap metal place will take them, I'm sure.
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Old 12-30-14, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by pallen View Post
I leave mine in the garage in Texas through the summer - never had an explosion.
As for the environmental impact, they are made from steel, the most recycled and one of the most abundant materials on earth. In a landfill, they basically turn to rust in short order. If it bothers you, you can also turn them in to be recycled - any scrap metal place will take them, I'm sure.
The heat was my main concern so if you've never had a problem with it in Texas, I'm sure I'll be fine as well.
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Old 12-30-14, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Ben I. View Post
The heat was my main concern so if you've never had a problem with it in Texas, I'm sure I'll be fine as well.
I've left mine on the bike, in the back of my car, on top of the parking garage, in Texas, with no tint. No issues.
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Old 12-31-14, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Ben I. View Post
The heat was my main concern so if you've never had a problem with it in Texas, I'm sure I'll be fine as well.
Yeah, my garage must get up to more than 100 deg F in the summer. Never a problem.
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Old 12-31-14, 05:49 AM
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Sounds good, thanks for the help guys!
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Old 12-31-14, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Ben I. View Post
I recently decided to get a CO2 inflator and am planning on putting it and a couple cartridges in my saddle bag.
I use the CO2 inflators myself. I don't get all that many flats... maybe once every 3K miles on average so I don't stock a lot of cartridges. I keep two in my saddle bag... and I think I have a spare or two in my supply cabinet in the garage,

Best tip I have for using the inflator.... is do a practice fix at home instead of learning on the road.
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Old 12-31-14, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
I use the CO2 inflators myself. I don't get all that many flats... maybe once every 3K miles on average so I don't stock a lot of cartridges. I keep two in my saddle bag... and I think I have a spare or two in my supply cabinet in the garage,

Best tip I have for using the inflator.... is do a practice fix at home instead of learning on the road.
Excellent tip! It actually dawned on me a few weeks ago that although I have all the stuff to fix flats I've never actually fixed one myself so I was kind of worried about it and if I'd be able to actually fix it "in the field". I've had one flat but it was very soon after getting back into cycling again so I didn't have any way of fixing it so I had the LBS fix it.

Since then I got all the necessary things to fix it but only knew how to do it in theory not in practice so a couple weeks ago I went thru the motions of fixing it and it really isn't too bad. Yeah some parts are annoying (getting the tire all the way back on) but it goes pretty quick and I'm glad I pushed myself to pseudo fix a flat so now I'm not terrified of it happening out on a ride.

I just got the inflator a couple days ago but planning on doing the same thing with it so I know the in's and out's of it.
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Old 12-31-14, 09:15 AM
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When we were kids, we used to pack the empties with match heads, and shoot 'em out of downspouts.........................
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Old 12-31-14, 09:19 AM
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What we have here is a "quit worrying about nothing" situation.
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Old 12-31-14, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
When we were kids, we used to pack the empties with match heads, and shoot 'em out of downspouts.........................
best tip in this thread
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Old 12-31-14, 11:07 AM
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The only restrictions I have seen on CO2 cartridges is that they can not be taken on airplanes. I have kept mine in hot garages for years.

Keep in mind that CO2 get as cold as a ice cube when being used but that isn't an issue with some CO2 inflators. I used a Air Chuck because it all metal and weighs 17 grams. I just wrap a piece of cloth around the cartridge.
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Old 12-31-14, 11:41 AM
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My CO2 gets exhaled.
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Old 12-31-14, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Ben I. View Post
Excellent tip! It actually dawned on me a few weeks ago that although I have all the stuff to fix flats I've never actually fixed one myself so I was kind of worried about it and if I'd be able to actually fix it "in the field". I've had one flat but it was very soon after getting back into cycling again so I didn't have any way of fixing it so I had the LBS fix it.

Since then I got all the necessary things to fix it but only knew how to do it in theory not in practice so a couple weeks ago I went thru the motions of fixing it and it really isn't too bad. Yeah some parts are annoying (getting the tire all the way back on) but it goes pretty quick and I'm glad I pushed myself to pseudo fix a flat so now I'm not terrified of it happening out on a ride.

I just got the inflator a couple days ago but planning on doing the same thing with it so I know the in's and out's of it.
Not sure what you mean by "fix" a flat on a ride. I would say "change a tube." Except in a very rare case you should not be having to repair the tube while out on the road. Just install a spare tube and fix the bad one back at home. Or not. It is up to.
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Old 12-31-14, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Not sure what you mean by "fix" a flat on a ride. I would say "change a tube." Except in a very rare case you should not be having to repair the tube while out on the road. Just install a spare tube and fix the bad one back at home. Or not. It is up to.
By the way in moist climates it is not unusual for the metal tip of the inflator to freeze to the valve stem from the cooling during the expansion of the CO2. Just use your fingers to warm it up and pull it off the valve stem with a sudden force.
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Old 12-31-14, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Bradleykd View Post
best tip in this thread
Exactly what I thought when I saw it too. I couldn't stop laughing.

Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Not sure what you mean by "fix" a flat on a ride. I would say "change a tube." Except in a very rare case you should not be having to repair the tube while out on the road. Just install a spare tube and fix the bad one back at home. Or not. It is up to.
I just wasn't saying it right, I do mean change the tube on a ride since I've read that patches aren't always reliable.

Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
What we have here is a "quit worrying about nothing" situation.
I was pretty sure that there wasn't anything to worry about but like I said earlier in the thread, I used to work at a paintball field. Sometimes if CO2 tanks were left outside for long enough, the burst disk on them would go off although I think this only happened when left in direct sunlight, which wouldn't happen on a ride of course.
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Old 12-31-14, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Not sure what you mean by "fix" a flat on a ride. I would say "change a tube." Except in a very rare case you should not be having to repair the tube while out on the road. Just install a spare tube and fix the bad one back at home. Or not. It is up to.
We have different philosophies. I find the problem on the tube. Having done that, it takes a couple of minutes to patch it. Done. And I now have the tube clearly marked so finding the corresponding point on the tire is easy. If it needs a patch also to keep the tube in place or a tire wire removed, it happens. (Tire wire, the fine steel wires that are barely thicker than hairs from automobile tires. Now a large percentage of my flats.) Permanent repair. Don't even have to think about it again. Nothing more to do when I get home. I do carry two inner tubes and have used both. Being prepared means that most of my "epic" rides are due to distance and terrain, not bike issues.

Edit: patches done when it is not wet and you have kept (most of the) grease away (I never have "clean" hands when I patch a tire; my wheels are not "clean" and there is seldom soap and water around) are very reliable. My tossed tubes often have 4 or more patches and many miles of riding. If the patch doesn't work, I learn it that ride, not when I pull it out as a spare.

Ben

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Old 12-31-14, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Ben I. View Post
Exactly what I thought when I saw it too. I couldn't stop laughing.



I just wasn't saying it right, I do mean change the tube on a ride since I've read that patches aren't always reliable.



I was pretty sure that there wasn't anything to worry about but like I said earlier in the thread, I used to work at a paintball field. Sometimes if CO2 tanks were left outside for long enough, the burst disk on them would go off although I think this only happened when left in direct sunlight, which wouldn't happen on a ride of course.
If one goes off in your seat bag while on a ride, do let us know.
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Old 12-31-14, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
We have different philosophies. I find the problem on the tube. Having done that, it takes a couple of minutes to patch it. Done. And I now have the tube clearly marked so finding the corresponding point on the tire is easy. If it needs a patch also to keep the tube in place or a tire wire removed, it happens. (Tire wire, the fine steel wires that are barely thicker than hairs from automobile tires. Now a large percentage of my flats.) Permanent repair. Don't even have to think about it again. Nothing more to do when I get home. I do carry two inner tubes and have used both. Being prepared means that most of my "epic" rides are due to distance and terrain, not bike issues.

Edit: patches done when it is not wet and you have kept (most of the) grease away (I never have "clean" hands when I patch a tire; my wheels are not "clean" and there is seldom soap and water around) are very reliable. My tossed tubes often have 4 or more patches and many miles of riding. If the patch doesn't work, I learn it that ride, not when I pull it out as a spare.

Ben
You're right about the difference in philosophies. When I'm riding, I'm riding. When I'm wrenching, I'm wrenching. I do my best to keep the twain from meeting, although that is not 100% possible. When on the road repair work is needed, well it just has to be done. But taking even an extra 10 minutes out of a ride to patch a tire that isn't needed to finish a ride would seem absurd to me not even considering a riding companion. I do a quick check of the tire for obvious road hazards, and whether I find something or not, in the vast majority of cases I don't suffer a second flat from the same problem.
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