Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Electric shifting yes or steer clear

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Electric shifting yes or steer clear

Old 01-02-15, 10:21 AM
  #151  
f4rrest 
Farmer tan
 
f4rrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 7,989

Bikes: Allez, SuperSix Evo

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2869 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Okay, so it can be noisy. I don't have problem with that using KMC SL chains. But it is the most elegant solution to reducing cassette weight we have seen yet, eschewing aluminum and titanium and still matching their weight reduction potential. I think it is gorgeous. Plus it doesn't cut into Shimano-compatible aluminum freehub bodies. Pretty special if you ask me. I love outside-the-box solutions.
Hadn't seen this before. The machinist in me appreciates the design. I'd think the hardened steel teeth would have a longer service life as well.
f4rrest is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:27 AM
  #152  
rpenmanparker 
Senior Member
 
rpenmanparker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 28,411

Bikes: 1990 Romic Reynolds 531 custom build, Merlin Works CR Ti custom build, super light Workswell 066 custom build

Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6346 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by f4rrest View Post
Hadn't seen this before. The machinist in me appreciates the design. I'd think the hardened steel teeth would have a longer service life as well.
Zackly!
__________________
Robert

Originally Posted by LAJ View Post
No matter where I go, here I am...
rpenmanparker is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:35 AM
  #153  
zymphad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2,538

Bikes: Super Cheap gc3 approved Bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 493 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Shortnsalty44 View Post
Buying a new bike this coming year. Not against tech however a little weary of electric shifting (Ultegra DI2) for example. Just more things to go wrong and pricey repairs IMO. Looking for + and - 's. I can not take bike shops opinions for it because where I live they just want to sell you what they want to sell.
Why not? If you can afford it and remember to charge the battery, why not? It's more predictable and less tuning. Mechanical, cable tension loosen over time, and change. Electronic, tune it and good to go. Smoother, reliable shifting? Why not?
zymphad is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:39 AM
  #154  
Stucky
Old Fart
 
Stucky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bumpkinsville
Posts: 3,350

Bikes: '97 Klein Quantum '16 Gravity Knockout

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What does my mechanical-shifting rim-braked bicycle not do that I wish it did?

Nothing!

IMO, there is no need for more technology/complexity, when having it merely replicates that which we can already do easily and effici9ently a simpler way.

Computer-controlled electronics can be fine when they are used in an application where their existence is actually advantageous- like when their implementation relieves us of the burden of having to perform some difficult arduous task, or when it eliminates a boring repetitive process or distraction- but electronic shifting does not solve sucjh problems, because such problems do not exist on mechanically-shifted bikes- therefore it's existence is merely to replicate something which can already be done just as well by a much simpler and more direct system- and nothing more. Technology for technology's sake; rather than technology to solve a problem or offer a benefit.

I see technology as actually being bad and a hinderance when it offers no real benefit, but does serve to effectively remove the product-owner from the loop when it comes to service and control; and when it effectively requires that others have more of a stake in our products/makes us more reliant upon those others. This is also how companies effect planned obsolescence- like Microsoft does with Windows users: Your 8 yerar-old computer may still be in perfect physical shape, but it's OS is no longer supported; and although consumer-level computer technology has matured and remained pretty much flat in the last 8 years, Microsoft makes you get a new computer; for, even though you will do the very same things with that computer that you did with your 8 year-old 'puter, you will now need more power and capacity just to run the OS.

Bottom line: I don't need or want computer-controlled electronics to do something which I can effortlessly, easily and efficiently do with a simple mechanical system.

EDIT: And, with mech-i-nical shifting, I actually have a direct connection to the derailers, and can actually feel what is going on, through my hand, through the cable. I can time my shifts precisely. I am in complete control- putting in input, and also getting back response/feeling. To me, that is so much better than merely pushing a button; waiting for a computer to decide when the time is right; and getting no feedback/feeling. I can not BELIEVE that CYCLISTS would give up that level of control and response and delegate it to a computer. It seems antithetical to everything I had always imagined cyclists being about.

Last edited by Stucky; 01-02-15 at 10:51 AM.
Stucky is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:44 AM
  #155  
spdntrxi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: East Bay Area ,CA
Posts: 1,553

Bikes: Parlee,BMC,Specialized and Trek

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by zymphad View Post
Why not? If you can afford it and remember to charge the battery, why not? It's more predictable and less tuning. Mechanical, cable tension loosen over time, and change. Electronic, tune it and good to go. Smoother, reliable shifting? Why not?
exactly... it's a wonderful system.. I have one more bike to convert to Ui2.(crit bike).. others are Di2 and I could not be happier.
spdntrxi is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:45 AM
  #156  
zymphad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2,538

Bikes: Super Cheap gc3 approved Bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 493 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Eh... Windows 8 is actually the most efficient OS Microsoft has developed yet. It's the best OS for mobile devices. It runs on low spec machines fantastically well and scales superbly with better hardware. With DX12 coming, with low latency, low level API, Windows will scale even better with low spec to high spec hardware. It has more efficient use of power, threading etc than previous OS. It's support for drivers and switchable graphics is superb.
zymphad is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:48 AM
  #157  
pallen 
Descends like a rock
 
pallen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 4,022

Bikes: Scott Foil, Surly Pacer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
I see technology as actually being bad and a hinderance when it offers no real benefit, but does serve to effectively remove the product-owner from the loop when it comes to service and control; and when it effectively requires that others have more of a stake in our products/makes us more reliant upon those others.
How does electronic shifting do any of that? Its no different from mechanical.
pallen is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:49 AM
  #158  
pallen 
Descends like a rock
 
pallen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 4,022

Bikes: Scott Foil, Surly Pacer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by zymphad View Post
Eh... Windows 8 is actually the most efficient OS Microsoft has developed yet. It's the best OS for mobile devices. It runs on low spec machines fantastically well and scales superbly with better hardware. With DX12 coming, with low latency, low level API, Windows will scale even better with low spec to high spec hardware. It has more efficient use of power, threading etc than previous OS. It's support for drivers and switchable graphics is superb.
ha, yeah, I put it on an old XP-era Dell laptop I had laying around - its actually usable now.
pallen is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 10:58 AM
  #159  
gregf83 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 8,750
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 895 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
What does my mechanical-shifting rim-braked bicycle not do that I wish it did?

Nothing!

IMO, there is no need for more technology/complexity, when having it merely replicates that which we can already do easily and effici9ently a simpler way.

Computer-controlled electronics can be fine when they are used in an application where their existence is actually advantageous- like when their implementation relieves us of the burden of having to perform some difficult arduous task, or when it eliminates a boring repetitive process or distraction- but electronic shifting does not solve sucjh problems, because such problems do not exist on mechanically-shifted bikes- therefore it's existence is merely to replicate something which can already be done just as well by a much simpler and more direct system- and nothing more. Technology for technology's sake; rather than technology to solve a problem or offer a benefit.
Electronic shifting provides more consistent shifting and eliminates the need to change shifter cables. You may enjoy changing cables but I find it a boring repetitive distraction so I generally procrastinate until the change in shifting feel annoys me more than the hassle of replacing cables.

That would be the primary benefit for me. I don't care about shifting faster as my shifts are plenty fast enough as it is. But I would appreciate consistent shifter feel without the need to replace cables.
gregf83 is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 11:03 AM
  #160  
Alias530
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,297
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by gregf83 View Post
Electronic shifting provides more consistent shifting and eliminates the need to change shifter cables. You may enjoy changing cables but I find it a boring repetitive distraction so I generally procrastinate until the change in shifting feel annoys me more than the hassle of replacing cables.

That would be the primary benefit for me. I don't care about shifting faster as my shifts are plenty fast enough as it is. But I would appreciate consistent shifter feel without the need to replace cables.
Changing cables is not something you have to do very often at all... even on my cross and mountain bikes they last multiple seasons. The cables on my road bike that doesn't even see wet pavement, much less rain and mud, will probably last longer than I'll keep the bike.

That said, I'll probably go Di2 Ultegra with my next bike vs. mechanical Dura Ace but I'm not sure. Just saying cable replacement is so far down the list of things I care about that it isn't a factor.
Alias530 is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 11:08 AM
  #161  
bt
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Could be, but then that is what SRAM is working out of the system right now, don't you think? I would imagine the shifters and corresponding derailleurs on that same bike will be coded to work exclusively together, and I'm sure there will be other safeguards as well.

I hope it's as good as their brakes were.
bt is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 11:46 AM
  #162  
Jiggle
Senior Member
 
Jiggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Somewhere in TX
Posts: 2,269

Bikes: BH, Cervelo, Cube, Canyon

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
Tsk. Tsk. How little you know. The garage door opener will actuate the wings for human powered flight. It is the TV remote that will cause a problem.
TV remote is LOS IR. Garage door opener is omnidirectional RF.
Jiggle is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 12:05 PM
  #163  
StanSeven
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Delaware shore
Posts: 13,085

Bikes: Cervelo C5, Guru Photon, Waterford, Specialized CX

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 584 Post(s)
Liked 32 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by gregf83 View Post
Electronic shifting provides more consistent shifting.
This alone sold me. Since getting Di2 2.5 years ago I can't think of missing one shift. I compare that to some hilly rides prior with awful results - standing, desparely trying to hang on the wheel ahead or group I'm with and bad shifts
StanSeven is online now  
Old 01-02-15, 12:06 PM
  #164  
grolby
Senior Member
 
grolby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: BOSTON BABY
Posts: 9,632
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 235 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by BoSoxYacht View Post
misshifts from radio interference could be a huge problem though. I don't think hacking will become an issue for most, but I wouldn't put anything past the pro teams in the grand tours.
There have been significant leaps in signal coding and encryption in the last few years that make both interference and hacking, especially the latter, much less of a problem. Doesn't mean that interference isn't a potential challenge, especially with the ever-increasing amount of radio waves spraying around inside a peloton, but the tools have been in place to make this doable for a few years now.

I think all of the snark about hacking or jamming another pro team's shifting is pretty silly. Signal encryption today is extremely advanced. Cycling teams do not have the expertise to even try it, without hiring outside help. And that outside help would not be able to reliably break the signaling encryption, since most of the time they wouldn't even be able to find it. Lots of low-power radio signals moving along at 20-30 mph in an open environment. People think this is an easy problem? Not even remotely worth the investment of time, money and equipment it would take to try it. Environmental interference is a much more realistic issue, but I think they can beat that one.
grolby is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 12:16 PM
  #165  
grolby
Senior Member
 
grolby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: BOSTON BABY
Posts: 9,632
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 235 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
EDIT: And, with mech-i-nical shifting, I actually have a direct connection to the derailers, and can actually feel what is going on, through my hand, through the cable. I can time my shifts precisely. I am in complete control- putting in input, and also getting back response/feeling. To me, that is so much better than merely pushing a button; waiting for a computer to decide when the time is right; and getting no feedback/feeling. I can not BELIEVE that CYCLISTS would give up that level of control and response and delegate it to a computer. It seems antithetical to everything I had always imagined cyclists being about.
Oh?

Originally Posted by Hamlet
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
grolby is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 12:26 PM
  #166  
gregf83 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 8,750
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 895 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by grolby View Post
I think all of the snark about hacking or jamming another pro team's shifting is pretty silly. Signal encryption today is extremely advanced. Cycling teams do not have the expertise to even try it, without hiring outside help. And that outside help would not be able to reliably break the signaling encryption, since most of the time they wouldn't even be able to find it. Lots of low-power radio signals moving along at 20-30 mph in an open environment. People think this is an easy problem? Not even remotely worth the investment of time, money and equipment it would take to try it. Environmental interference is a much more realistic issue, but I think they can beat that one.
Hacking is hard, jamming can be easy and encryption will not prevent or mitigate jamming.
gregf83 is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 12:41 PM
  #167  
RNAV
Flyin' under the radar
 
RNAV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: O'Fallon, IL
Posts: 739

Bikes: '15 Trek Emonda SL8 Red, '03 LeMond Croix de fer custom painted, '90 Trek 420 converted to FG

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by grolby View Post
There have been significant leaps in signal coding and encryption in the last few years that make both interference and hacking, especially the latter, much less of a problem . . . . I think all of the snark about hacking or jamming another pro team's shifting is pretty silly. Signal encryption today is extremely advanced. Cycling teams do not have the expertise to even try it, without hiring outside help.
Hacking would require military grade know-how and equipment, and pretty significant intel in order to know exactly whose (i.e. specific rider in peloton) groupset you're targeting. Not only would you have to be able to find that one particular signal, but you'd have to be able to find it amongst multiple similar signals, differentiate it from the others, and then have the capability break the encryption code in order to successfully hack that system. Oh, and you'd have to either be relatively close to the rider, or have a very large and powerful transmitter to broadcast far away from the rider . . . something like that would be pretty easy to spot, especially on a mobile platform that would be following the peloton.

The only truly plausible electronic attack scenario that I can envision with wireless shifting would a mechanical-equipped team barrage jamming the entire peloton. It would only affect those running wireless. And it would require a high-powered jammer, which would require a significant power source and a large platform to broadcast the jamming signal -- again, easy to spot assuming a mobile platform. And it'd likely interfere with radio/television communications, so everyone in the world would know someone's trying to jam the peloton. And it'd be pretty easy to figure out who.

So, ultimately, if you know anything about electronic warfare, while the possibility of negatively impacting a wireless shifting group set exists, the likelihood of both capability and implementation is so unlikely that this argument against wireless shifting simply isn't plausible.

As a side note, I held the same opinions regarding manual vs. electronic groupsets as all the other folks advocating mechanical. I drive a manual transmission car, so I want to be in charge, I want to control the shift, feel the feedback, etc.

And then I actually rode a Di2-equipped bike. It was a revelation, and it completely changed my opinion. Especially when you consider the absolute authority with which the front derailleur shifts, mechanical is simply stone-age in comparison. Being able to press-and-hold to make multiple-gear shifts, having the ability to have remote shifter locations (i.e. sprint shifter in the drops; climber's shifter on the tops), etc., has me sold on electronic. I'm of the opinion that if you haven't ridden a bike with an electronic groupset, you don't really know what you're talking about -- you're merely speculating. Which is totally ok, and you're completely entitled to your opinion . . . but it's an uneducated opinion if you haven't experienced it for yourself.
RNAV is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 01:30 PM
  #168  
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 3,998

Bikes: N+1=5

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 536 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by RNAV View Post
Hacking would require military grade know-how and equipment, and pretty significant intel in order to know exactly whose (i.e. specific rider in peloton) groupset you're targeting. Not only would you have to be able to find that one particular signal, but you'd have to be able to find it amongst multiple similar signals, differentiate it from the others, and then have the capability break the encryption code in order to successfully hack that system. Oh, and you'd have to either be relatively close to the rider, or have a very large and powerful transmitter to broadcast far away from the rider . . . something like that would be pretty easy to spot, especially on a mobile platform that would be following the peloton.

The only truly plausible electronic attack scenario that I can envision with wireless shifting would a mechanical-equipped team barrage jamming the entire peloton. It would only affect those running wireless. And it would require a high-powered jammer, which would require a significant power source and a large platform to broadcast the jamming signal -- again, easy to spot assuming a mobile platform. And it'd likely interfere with radio/television communications, so everyone in the world would know someone's trying to jam the peloton. And it'd be pretty easy to figure out who.

So, ultimately, if you know anything about electronic warfare, while the possibility of negatively impacting a wireless shifting group set exists, the likelihood of both capability and implementation is so unlikely that this argument against wireless shifting simply isn't plausible.
Well said. This is just not going to be a problem - at all. I'm more interested to see how they handle the battery situation. While much more mundane than jamming and hacking, this is going to be more of an issue and it will depend on how they design around it. Likely, it will mean SRAM will need to make a jump down in battery consumption which ought to be interesting.


As a side note, I held the same opinions regarding manual vs. electronic groupsets as all the other folks advocating mechanical. I drive a manual transmission car, so I want to be in charge, I want to control the shift, feel the feedback, etc.

And then I actually rode a Di2-equipped bike. It was a revelation, and it completely changed my opinion. Especially when you consider the absolute authority with which the front derailleur shifts, mechanical is simply stone-age in comparison. Being able to press-and-hold to make multiple-gear shifts, having the ability to have remote shifter locations (i.e. sprint shifter in the drops; climber's shifter on the tops), etc., has me sold on electronic. I'm of the opinion that if you haven't ridden a bike with an electronic groupset, you don't really know what you're talking about -- you're merely speculating. Which is totally ok, and you're completely entitled to your opinion . . . but it's an uneducated opinion if you haven't experienced it for yourself.
Glad to hear. I'm making the jump on my next bike build.

J.
JohnJ80 is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 01:37 PM
  #169  
Fiery
Senior Member
 
Fiery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 1,314
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 218 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Stucky View Post
I can not BELIEVE that CYCLISTS would give up that level of control and response and delegate it to a computer. It seems antithetical to everything I had always imagined cyclists being about.
Why should cyclists be about anything? Cycling is a sport, a hobby, or simply a mode of transportation, not a philosophy, political movement or religion.
Fiery is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 01:44 PM
  #170  
RJM
I'm doing it wrong.
 
RJM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,854

Bikes: Trek Remedy 9.8, Rivendell Appaloosa, Kona Jake the Snake CR, Trek Fuel Ex, Riv Atlantis, Niner Sir9, Trek Crockett

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6145 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by Fiery View Post
or religion.
The hell it's not.
RJM is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 01:53 PM
  #171  
spdntrxi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: East Bay Area ,CA
Posts: 1,553

Bikes: Parlee,BMC,Specialized and Trek

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't care about this artsy fartsy feel BS.. I just want the gear to shift correctly and with as little chatter as possible... this is what electronic does..
spdntrxi is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 02:35 PM
  #172  
dalava
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 3,230

Bikes: Moots Vamoots, Colnago C60, Santa Cruz Stigmata CC, and too many other bikes I don't ride

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by spdntrxi View Post
I don't care about this artsy fartsy feel BS.. I just want the gear to shift correctly and with as little chatter as possible... this is what electronic does..
Exactly what part of mechanical shifting is "artsy fartsy feel BS"?
dalava is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 02:42 PM
  #173  
spdntrxi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: East Bay Area ,CA
Posts: 1,553

Bikes: Parlee,BMC,Specialized and Trek

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dalava View Post
Exactly what part of mechanical shifting is "artsy fartsy feel BS"?
when ppl start talking about their connection with the RD or the FD or whatever..feedback and feeling. nonsense.
spdntrxi is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 02:43 PM
  #174  
dalava
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 3,230

Bikes: Moots Vamoots, Colnago C60, Santa Cruz Stigmata CC, and too many other bikes I don't ride

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
For me, whatever the advantage of today's electronic shifting over mechanical is not worth the the added complexity and weight.

I had the 6770 (2 years) and 9070 (less than 1 year) on two of my bikes, but recently took them both off and put the mechanical groups back on (Campy SR and DA 9001/9000). I hated the little whirring sound and the lack of feel of electronic shifting.
dalava is offline  
Old 01-02-15, 02:44 PM
  #175  
dalava
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 3,230

Bikes: Moots Vamoots, Colnago C60, Santa Cruz Stigmata CC, and too many other bikes I don't ride

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by spdntrxi View Post
when ppl start talking about their connection with the RD or the FD or whatever..feedback and feeling. nonsense.
Why is that? Didn't you feel connected to the lever/cable/derailleur when you shift mechanically?
dalava is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.