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-   -   Questions about single speed chains , do they wear faster ? (https://www.bikeforums.net/singlespeed-fixed-gear/1038999-questions-about-single-speed-chains-do-they-wear-faster.html)

ufbeans 11-23-15 03:58 PM


Originally Posted by SquidPuppet (Post 18340650)
Those are sexy as hell with their hollow pins and plates. But my experience has been that the super cheap ones like the (1/8) Z410 NP or Gold, and the (3/32)Z610 HX seem to last forever. And the plating seems to hold up really well too. i hope they never discontinue them.

It's a dirty little secret but all chains stretch and fast if you put a lot of pressure on them fixed. I'll try those Super toughness chains next but honestly I'm not expecting much more than what I'm getting now. The z410's are probably the easiest chain to stretch I've ever used.Thanks Scrod.

SquidPuppet 11-23-15 04:09 PM


Originally Posted by ufbeans (Post 18340679)
It's a dirty little secret but all chains stretch and fast if you put a lot of pressure on them fixed. I'll try those Super toughness chains next but honestly I'm not expecting much more than what I'm getting now. The z410's are probably the easiest chain to stretch I've ever used.Thanks Scrod.

Chains don't stretch. :)

ufbeans 11-23-15 04:13 PM


Originally Posted by SquidPuppet (Post 18340716)
Chains don't stretch. :)


Technically correct but practically useless information sir. Take your materials engineering knowledge to a nerd forum like frame builders. It has no place in the fixie lounge. :lol:

SquidPuppet 11-23-15 04:52 PM


Originally Posted by ufbeans (Post 18340728)
Technically correct but practically useless information sir. Take your materials engineering knowledge to a nerd forum like frame builders. It has no place in the fixie lounge. :lol:

:roflmao2:

Seriously though, do you really stretch a chain past the tolerance mark in just a couple months? I aint strong, but because chains are so cheap I abuse the snot out of them and I have a couple with about 3500 miles on them and they are no where near needing replacement.

ufbeans 11-23-15 05:10 PM


Originally Posted by SquidPuppet (Post 18340840)
:roflmao2:

Seriously though, do you really stretch a chain past the tolerance mark in just a couple months? I aint strong, but because chains are so cheap I abuse the snot out of them and I have a couple with about 3500 miles on them and they are no where near needing replacement.


Short answer is yes. I use the old 12 inch ruler technique. Line up the ruler at the center of a pin and if the end doesn't line up with the center of another pin then your chain is at least partially stretched. Within tolerance is subjective. I'm a little ocd about this stuff. I grab the ruler when my drive train starts getting louder and lube doesn't quiet it down. A stretched chain is a loud chain. I have a front brake but I skid a lot for fun and I do tend to run a my chains tight. I prefer a tight chain for torquey starts from a standing position at stops. Everyone's riding style and setup is different though.

SquidPuppet 11-23-15 06:23 PM


Originally Posted by ufbeans (Post 18340892)
I prefer a tight chain

There it is. That'll surely kill them prematurely. Not to mention BB bearings, hub bearings, and cog/chainring life are hurt by a tight chain. I'm surprised that your OCD for silence (me too big time) has allowed you to run a tight drive train. IME that's the first and easiest place to eliminate excess noise. Even over lube and chain line issues.

That tight chain is sapping your horsepower too. Loose is luxurious. :)

ufbeans 11-23-15 06:50 PM


Originally Posted by SquidPuppet (Post 18341083)
There it is. That'll surely kill them prematurely. Not to mention BB bearings, hub bearings, and cog/chainring life are hurt by a tight chain. I'm surprised that your OCD for silence (me too big time) has allowed you to run a tight drive train. IME that's the first and easiest place to eliminate excess noise. Even over lube and chain line issues.

That tight chain is sapping your horsepower too. Loose is luxurious. :)

Yea yea I hear ya haha. One man's tight is another mans's floppy. I don't think my chain is too tight but yes if I ran it floppy I'm sure it would last longer. I just use my bike differently.

Scrodzilla 11-23-15 08:55 PM


Originally Posted by Regulatori (Post 18340509)
I couldn't find the original "ask a quick question" thread so figure I'll ask it here.

Is it easier to add links to more expensive chains vs cheaper chains?

Whenever I try to add links, that new section always seems to bind a little. I use a chain tool and pop the pin almost out (just enough to insert a new section) but soon as I push the pin back in, that section always sticks a bit and never feels totally smooth.

Not sure if it's because I suck or it's a bit more difficult with $8 KMC chains vs higher quality chains.

Most chain tools have a loosening shelf designed specifically for (you guessed it) loosening a link after pushing the pin back in. If you don't know what I'm referring to, Google it.

Regulatori 11-24-15 03:27 PM


Originally Posted by Scrodzilla (Post 18341393)
Most chain tools have a loosening shelf designed specifically for (you guessed it) loosening a link after pushing the pin back in. If you don't know what I'm referring to, Google it.

Whoa...mind blown. I figured the different grooves were for different thickness of chains...no idea they were for loosening a link after adding. Thanks.

canadian deacon 11-25-15 09:19 AM

Replacing a chain is cheaper than replacing automotive brake pads. I look at a chain as a consumable and replace as necessary. A bike is much cheaper to maintain than a car.

bike_galpal 11-25-15 03:40 PM

doesn't it all depend on different peoples cadences and gear ratios? and like, if they use any pedal retention? also like i mean i do a 3.3 ratio without pedal retention and i think i can get started reasonably fast, but i also don't just like put all my weight onto the pedals cause that just seems like asking for it.


Originally Posted by ufbeans (Post 18341143)
One man's tight is another mans's floppy.

so true... :roflmao2:

ufbeans 11-25-15 04:05 PM

Lol... So imho gear ratios being equal, a floppy chain will get you off the line slower than a less floppy chain assuming the tighter chain isn't so tight it's binding. It just takes a tighter chain less time to bite if that makes sense. But like most declarative statements on the internets, this is based on anecdotal personal experience and not laboratory testing so take it for what it's worth.


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