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Riding 100km / ~63mi

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Riding 100km / ~63mi

Old 07-11-16, 01:14 AM
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tuxxdk
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Riding 100km / ~63mi

Hello

I'm thinking of riding a longer distance on my fixed gear. I haven't ridden longer than 45km / 28mi ever, so more than double seems a lot to me.

My bike is a vintage steel running 69gi, flat handlebars w/horns and 25c tyres.

How can I prepare myself for that ride with fixed gear?

I ride multiple times a week but not very long. Mostly 35km / 22mi tops each time.

Thanks!
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Old 07-11-16, 02:37 AM
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It's best to gradually increase your mileage so you don't injure yourself. Try adding 10k or 15k to your regular rides until you feel good taking on more distance. When you feel like you're ready for 100k, bring water, some food, and plan a route that has places you'll be able to refill on both if you need to. Also, make sure you have everything you'll need to fix a flat, and public transportation access wouldn't be a bad idea.

Or you could just say **** it, htfu, and go ride tomorrow until you fall off the bike.
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Old 07-11-16, 04:43 AM
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Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
It's best to gradually increase your mileage so you don't injure yourself. Try adding 10k or 15k to your regular rides until you feel good taking on more distance. When you feel like you're ready for 100k, bring water, some food, and plan a route that has places you'll be able to refill on both if you need to. Also, make sure you have everything you'll need to fix a flat, and public transportation access wouldn't be a bad idea.

Or you could just say **** it, htfu, and go ride tomorrow until you fall off the bike.

This.
To which I might add, If your shorter rides you do multiple times a week are done with intensity ( and only you can be the judge of that) fill your waterbottles , put a bar and a banana in your pocket and just do it.
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Old 07-11-16, 08:54 AM
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I say just ride it. Plan a route with some rest stops at a gas station or a market or a 7-11so you can refill on water and grab something to eat. Pace yourself, don't burn out by going too hard too early. Just enjoy a day on the bike without over thinking it.
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Old 07-11-16, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
and a banana in your pocket

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Old 07-11-16, 10:52 AM
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Knowing what kind of fuel you need to stay on the bike is like 50% of it. And chamois cream. When in doubt, bring more food and plan on needing at least 50% more fluids that you think you'll use. When I get it right, I feel like I could keep going for ages.
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Old 07-11-16, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
It's best to gradually increase your mileage so you don't injure yourself. Try adding 10k or 15k to your regular rides until you feel good taking on more distance. When you feel like you're ready for 100k, bring water, some food, and plan a route that has places you'll be able to refill on both if you need to. Also, make sure you have everything you'll need to fix a flat, and public transportation access wouldn't be a bad idea.

Or you could just say **** it, htfu, and go ride tomorrow until you fall off the bike.
Tools and spares are good to go. Transportation in case of psychical, mentally or mechanical breakdown is also in place.

I will try and increase my mileage on my next trip on the road. Perhaps I'll reach 75% of the intended milestone sooner than I expect it and the rest will be a walk in the park.



Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
This.
To which I might add, If your shorter rides you do multiple times a week are done with intensity ( and only you can be the judge of that) fill your waterbottles , put a bar and a banana in your pocket and just do it.
Not intensity per se, it's my commute (13,5km each way) with a, usually, weekend MTB trup with high intensity. I haven't ridden in a long time if I go 3 months back, but I can clearly see improvements from week to week. There's a hill on my commute that I just kill now, whereas it was the other way around earlier.

Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
I say just ride it. Plan a route with some rest stops at a gas station or a market or a 7-11so you can refill on water and grab something to eat. Pace yourself, don't burn out by going too hard too early. Just enjoy a day on the bike without over thinking it.
I definitely need to take the day off and enjoy it. You're probably right about not over thinking it. To me it's huge milestone, but in reality it's "only" a shortish trip compared to many races I guess.

The route is already set (from my home to my friends beach-house, circa 115km in-between). The route goes through smaller and larger cities with the usual gas and supermarkets on every corner.

Originally Posted by 50voltphantom View Post
Knowing what kind of fuel you need to stay on the bike is like 50% of it. And chamois cream. When in doubt, bring more food and plan on needing at least 50% more fluids that you think you'll use. When I get it right, I feel like I could keep going for ages.
This is my problem beforehand I think. I usually drink and eat when I feel hungry or thirsty on a trip, but I think it's already too late then. I'm getting better at timing it, but not quite there yet.
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Old 07-11-16, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by tuxxdk View Post
This is my problem beforehand I think. I usually drink and eat when I feel hungry or thirsty on a trip, but I think it's already too late then. I'm getting better at timing it, but not quite there yet.
It's super important. Been on the bike for an hour? Eat something. If it's even moderately warm you better have drained a bottle by then. Repeat as needed.
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Old 07-11-16, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by 50voltphantom View Post
It's super important. Been on the bike for an hour? Eat something. If it's even moderately warm you better have drained a bottle by then. Repeat as needed.
Duly noted and welded onto my handlebar now

Last trip high intensity MTB with riding to and from the home was 42km. I drained one 500ml bottle and consumed 1 banana and one small proteinsnack. I was tired..............
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Old 07-12-16, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by tuxxdk View Post
Duly noted and welded onto my handlebar now

Last trip high intensity MTB with riding to and from the home was 42km. I drained one 500ml bottle and consumed 1 banana and one small proteinsnack. I was tired..............
I take a 2L hydropack on extended mtb rides. But here it does get friggin hot anywhere you can mtb.
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Old 07-12-16, 10:06 AM
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Do it!

Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
I say just ride it. Plan a route with some rest stops at a gas station or a market or a 7-11so you can refill on water and grab something to eat. Pace yourself, don't burn out by going too hard too early. Just enjoy a day on the bike without over thinking it.
I'm with hairnet. Go for it. Per other replies, be sure you won't run out of water and calories, but that strikes me as common sense.
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Old 07-12-16, 10:33 AM
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As well as all the other great advice offered, I'd say to check and double check your fit on the bike. Anything that's slightly off can really rear it's ugly head over long distances and turn a comfortable, enjoyable distance ride into an uncomfortable crawl through hell to try and get home.
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Old 07-12-16, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
As well as all the other great advice offered, I'd say to check and double check your fit on the bike. Anything that's slightly off can really rear it's ugly head over long distances and turn a comfortable, enjoyable distance ride into an uncomfortable crawl through hell to try and get home.

This is good advice. If something is just Kinda-Sorta-Nagging you on short rides, it's going to become grueling punishment on a long ride.
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Old 07-12-16, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
I take a 2L hydropack on extended mtb rides. But here it does get friggin hot anywhere you can mtb.
I did have plenty of excess water with me - I just "forgot" to drink it.. punished myself in the end

Originally Posted by postprimepedal View Post
I'm with hairnet. Go for it. Per other replies, be sure you won't run out of water and calories, but that strikes me as common sense.
I like the "go for it" attitude I'll make sure I wont run out of calories.

Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
As well as all the other great advice offered, I'd say to check and double check your fit on the bike. Anything that's slightly off can really rear it's ugly head over long distances and turn a comfortable, enjoyable distance ride into an uncomfortable crawl through hell to try and get home.
Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
This is good advice. If something is just Kinda-Sorta-Nagging you on short rides, it's going to become grueling punishment on a long ride.
Sound advice I should dig into. I'll make not of what's nagging me and see to get it corrected.

Today, my new bike-shorts nagged me on my short commute. It would have been the same, comfort-wise, to not even wear them. Maybe I should visit the LBS and pay the price for a good pair, than play the lottery online at various shops.
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Old 07-12-16, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by tuxxdk View Post
Today, my new bike-shorts nagged me on my short commute. It would have been the same, comfort-wise, to not even wear them. Maybe I should visit the LBS and pay the price for a good pair, than play the lottery online at various shops.
As eye-wateringly difficult it is to drop 70+ on a pair of bib shorts, you really do get what you pay for!
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Old 07-12-16, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
As eye-wateringly difficult it is to drop 70+ on a pair of bib shorts, you really do get what you pay for!
I hope that's the case - I'd rather have one great pair than several mediocre ones. These were around 20 and it really is what I'm willing to spend, but not if it's no good. I need more commutes with them of course, but I'm not convinced of them yet.

I just hope my LBS is worth the premium and can fit me with a great pair I can wear underneath my baggy shorts.
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Old 07-12-16, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by tuxxdk View Post
I hope that's the case - I'd rather have one great pair than several mediocre ones. These were around 20 and it really is what I'm willing to spend, but not if it's no good. I need more commutes with them of course, but I'm not convinced of them yet.

I just hope my LBS is worth the premium and can fit me with a great pair I can wear underneath my baggy shorts.
Make sure you get bibbed shorts - it's a nightmare having to pull your shorts up every ten minutes.

Also you don't really want to be wearing anything with padded shorts, both underneath or over (particularly on long rides!). They're designed to be in contact with the wearer's skin and as such any layers on top or below the shorts will bunch up and cause chafing. So it's commando every time, without question. Of course though, if it's just for a short commute and you have no changing facilities at work it might be a good idea to just not wear padded lycra. If it is only 13.5 km then I'd warrant that it's not really worth busting out the chamois, but it's up to you whether it's worth the hassle or not!
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Old 07-12-16, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
Make sure you get bibbed shorts - it's a nightmare having to pull your shorts up every ten minutes.

Also you don't really want to be wearing anything with padded shorts, both underneath or over (particularly on long rides!). They're designed to be in contact with the wearer's skin and as such any layers on top or below the shorts will bunch up and cause chafing. So it's commando every time, without question. Of course though, if it's just for a short commute and you have no changing facilities at work it might be a good idea to just not wear padded lycra. If it is only 13.5 km then I'd warrant that it's not really worth busting out the chamois, but it's up to you whether it's worth the hassle or not!
I don't usually wear padded on my commutes - today was just to test the new ones. I never wear anything underneath, but these I just got are boxers with padding, not shorts per se. So they need an outer layer.

Hmm, I'll need to find a solution to the outer layer then. I'm a baggy person (no puns...) and really hate/loathe to get of my bike for a quick pitstop and look like someone from Tour de France just made a wrong turn. My bike-shoes are also relaxed SPD compatible shoes that I can walk normally in and that doesn't look like bike-shoes at all. My preferable upper body outer layer is a cotton hoodie I know.. I fall out of category, but that's just me

I say the above in general. For this metric century milestone I don't have larger issues with "full commando" - function over form. But for everything else I do prefer to look casual and not like someone "suited up".
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Old 07-12-16, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by tuxxdk View Post
I don't usually wear padded on my commutes - today was just to test the new ones. I never wear anything underneath, but these I just got are boxers with padding, not shorts per se. So they need an outer layer.

Hmm, I'll need to find a solution to the outer layer then. I'm a baggy person (no puns...) and really hate/loathe to get of my bike for a quick pitstop and look like someone from Tour de France just made a wrong turn. My bike-shoes are also relaxed SPD compatible shoes that I can walk normally in and that doesn't look like bike-shoes at all. My preferable upper body outer layer is a cotton hoodie I know.. I fall out of category, but that's just me

I say the above in general. For this metric century milestone I don't have larger issues with "full commando" - function over form. But for everything else I do prefer to look casual and not like someone "suited up".
Understandable, I hate looking like a human condom but putting in 250+ mile weeks I've started to care less and less about what I look like! My apologies, I was under the impression you were testing full blown shorts. A lot of manufacturers offer lycra that has a more relaxed fit, which may be worth looking into when it comes to the whole function-over-form element for a century.
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Old 07-12-16, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
Make sure you get bibbed shorts - it's a nightmare having to pull your shorts up every ten minutes.
I read this all the time, but have never experienced it. I have three pairs of $35 Bontrager non-bibbed shorts and have not once had to pull them up. Maybe if I lose some weight?
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Old 07-12-16, 07:08 PM
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In my experience, regular shorts are fine as long as they fit properly.
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Old 07-12-16, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
As well as all the other great advice offered, I'd say to check and double check your fit on the bike. Anything that's slightly off can really rear it's ugly head over long distances and turn a comfortable, enjoyable distance ride into an uncomfortable crawl through hell to try and get home.
riding fixed magnifies this 10 fold.

i would know

Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
In my experience, regular shorts are fine as long as they fit properly.
Agreed. I used to be all over snug cut-off denim shorts for riding.

Plus getting bibs just for this ride complicates things. There's no guarantee the bibs will fit and feel good, so he has to postpone the ride until he gets a set that feels good. He should just do the ride and be happy to be outside. He can go shopping after he proves to himself that 60 miles nothing to fear.

Last edited by hairnet; 07-12-16 at 09:13 PM.
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Old 07-18-16, 12:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
Understandable, I hate looking like a human condom but putting in 250+ mile weeks I've started to care less and less about what I look like! My apologies, I was under the impression you were testing full blown shorts. A lot of manufacturers offer lycra that has a more relaxed fit, which may be worth looking into when it comes to the whole function-over-form element for a century.
Sorry for my late reply!

To be fair, I'm not even sure what I'm looking for myself anylonger.. I had hoped I could just wear my regular shorts on top of my bib or non-bib cycling pants.

Originally Posted by 50voltphantom View Post
I read this all the time, but have never experienced it. I have three pairs of $35 Bontrager non-bibbed shorts and have not once had to pull them up. Maybe if I lose some weight?
Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
In my experience, regular shorts are fine as long as they fit properly.
I have to pull mine up all the time, but I'm beginning to think they just don't fit properly.


Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
riding fixed magnifies this 10 fold.

i would know


Agreed. I used to be all over snug cut-off denim shorts for riding.

Plus getting bibs just for this ride complicates things. There's no guarantee the bibs will fit and feel good, so he has to postpone the ride until he gets a set that feels good. He should just do the ride and be happy to be outside. He can go shopping after he proves to himself that 60 miles nothing to fear.
I rode 20mi this weekend, and I wasn't even half into the ride, before my ass got sore like a PIA (!). Them cycling shorts I have now are a POS.

I seriously need some that fit me.
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Old 07-18-16, 04:43 AM
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I have ridden several 200km rides on my fixed gear and there is nothing particular to be concerned with other than the distance. I would not recommend riding more in a day than you would normally ride in a week. One big thing I have found is nutrition. Eat a lot before you depart. I have an extra big breakfast (big for me) an hour before I leave. This gives me time to digest. My normal trick is to have two egg McMuffins on the drive to the start.

100km is a great goal. Have fun on your ride and enjoy!
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