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Most durable speed coaster brake hub?

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Most durable speed coaster brake hub?

Old 07-14-17, 02:40 PM
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jpvjr71
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Most durable speed coaster brake hub?

Shimano, Sturmey Archer, or someone I never heard of?
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Old 07-14-17, 03:20 PM
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Durable speed? I don't quite know what you are asking.
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Old 07-14-17, 04:34 PM
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What are you trying to do? Plain old road riding or single speed mountain biking with only a coaster brake?
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Old 07-14-17, 04:41 PM
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bendix red band. nothing better. ask atomic paul.
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Old 07-15-17, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
Durable speed? I don't quite know what you are asking.

My mistake my time ran out at the library. I am asking who makes the most durable 1 speed coaster brake hub for an ADULT. I realize I'd need to put on a front brake (which I can canabalize off of my old Raleigh).

The only experience I have w CB's is as a little kid.
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Old 07-15-17, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by jpvjr71 View Post
My mistake my time ran out at the library. I am asking who makes the most durable 1 speed coaster brake hub for an ADULT. I realize I'd need to put on a front brake (which I can canabalize off of my old Raleigh).

The only experience I have w CB's is as a little kid.
The most durable modern single speed coaster brake hub is the Shimano CB-E110 in my opinion. It also works the best. It's also the simplest internally. Replacement parts are readily available almost everywhere. I've been using them on my bikes for decades without any internal or external breakage or malfunction.

They are available with two different size spoke holes in the flanges (105g and 80g). So be sure to buy the one that best suits the spokes that you intend to use.
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Old 07-20-17, 10:58 AM
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I have a Hi-stop coaster hub...serviced it after a few hundred miles of street riding...it still looks like new...so I got my money's worth...I heard this is suppose to be a cheap hub...but I can't feel any drag and it's durable enough for me.
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Old 07-20-17, 11:39 PM
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The only coaster brake hub I dealt with was Shimano's 3 speed nexus. It worked great for my SO but maintenance was a messy PITA because I'm a stickler for maintenance. We lived on a steeper hill which put the hub through more wear and tear. The coaster brake's braking power began to fade sooner and have less "bite"; as expected.

With that aside, you could run it into the ground without much issue. Having had the privilege of dealing with it, its designed well in such a manner that prevents catastrophic failure/ sudden loss of braking ability. You will notice that you will need to have it serviced as described above. After all, the target market for this hub was actually beach cruisers and we all know how the vast majority of those get treated.
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Old 07-27-17, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
The most durable modern single speed coaster brake hub is the Shimano CB-E110 in my opinion. It also works the best. It's also the simplest internally. Replacement parts are readily available almost everywhere. I've been using them on my bikes for decades without any internal or external breakage or malfunction.

They are available with two different size spoke holes in the flanges (105g and 80g). So be sure to buy the one that best suits the spokes that you intend to use.

If I were to rip one apart (not going to happen) I'd guess this would work. I forgot about sizing the spokes/flanges, good to know someone is doing my thinking for me.

One issue I had with my old CB as a kid was the axle broke. It was on a Schwinn Scrambler BMX bike I rode of a modified curb ramp. But I'm not planning on doing that again so it's a moot point.
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Old 07-27-17, 08:25 PM
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I wouldn't want a coaster brake for much of anything these days. Now that we have way better braking systems. If you are desperate for a hub braking system, roller or drum brakes are a touch better. However if I was building a beach cruiser that would be used only on flat land with no cars or very few cars and I was wearing flip flops I might consider a coaster.
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Old 07-28-17, 11:15 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
I wouldn't want a coaster brake for much of anything these days. Now that we have way better braking systems. If you are desperate for a hub braking system, roller or drum brakes are a touch better. However if I was building a beach cruiser that would be used only on flat land with no cars or very few cars and I was wearing flip flops I might consider a coaster.
The Shimano CB-E110 is a good rear braking system. They modulate as well as any rear rim brake and have enough power to easily lock the wheel if you choose to do so. Strong, silent, smooth, cleaner, rainproof, no cable stretch, no pad wear, no rim damage, less coasting drag, and less maintenance than a free wheel are the facts. Contrary to popular belief, they are also just fine for regular hills. If anyone is relying on any rear brake alone for going down really long steep grades or surviving busy traffic, they are gambling to a degree. All rear brakes are inadequate for emergency stopping. CB-E110s are also lighter than a single speed hub and rim brake combo. Even when compared to top shelf setups like Dura-Ace or Campy track hubs with a White Industies free wheel and Paul, Tektro, or Shimano calipers and levers, the CB-E110 wins by a significant amount grams.

The whole MYTH that coaster brakes are junk began and continues because of unfair comparisons based on bad experiences. People have ridden an improperly adjusted and/or poorly maintained rental bike, or the neighbor's beater, or a thrashed child's bike and have not been able to stop well. Then they share their Knowledge about how junky and heavy CB hubs are with others, and on it goes.

A downhill bicycle racer should not rely on a coaster brake as his only form of stopping power. But for many other forms of riding a coaster brake isn't just adequate, in many ways it's superior to other rear braking systems.

Last edited by SquidPuppet; 07-29-17 at 12:28 AM.
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Old 07-28-17, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
The Shimano CB-E110 is a good rear braking system.
Out of curiosity, how do you think it compares to the Bendix red band? I'm asking because I just built up a single speed with an old red band that I've had forever. I'm enjoying the bike, but braking power leaves much to be desired.

Is there a good technical reason why I might expect the CB-E110 to behave differently? The both seem to have the same basic operating principle. I'd love to see them taken apart, side by side. I'm not averse to adding hand brakes, but might as well learn what I can about the coaster.
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Old 07-29-17, 01:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
Out of curiosity, how do you think it compares to the Bendix red band?
I believe the old Bendix hubs are satisfactory. I'm in the minority though, as most people believe they are the best.

I'm enjoying the bike, but braking power leaves much to be desired.
It's possible that you have a junior model. Is it 28 spoke? The junior models employ only ONE brake shoe. Have you serviced the hub?

Is there a good technical reason why I might expect the CB-E110 to behave differently?
IMO yes. Modern metallurgy and better tolerances. I believe the modern shoe and hub materials are better suited to one another. The machining on the inside of the Shimano hub shell is actually impressive. Also, the internals don't just fit, they fit well. It's a crudely simple piece of engineering, but it's not crudely specd or manufactured. It's 2017 and the improvements over 50+ years can easily be seen with the naked eye.

The both seem to have the same basic operating principle.
Yes, the same. The Shimano is just a bit simpler by virtue of fewer parts, and I prefer Shimanos clutch engagement design.

The Bendix hubs are pricey and sourcing 50 year old parts aint easy. The Shimanos are readily available at very low prices in different drillings for a variety if spoke sizes and replacement parts are easy to find and cheap. With CB-E110 having enough power to easily lock the wheel coupled with excellent modulation characteristics, I see no logical reason to run a red band, or blue or yellow. Unless one was going for a period correct restoration build.


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Old 07-29-17, 08:29 AM
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@SquidPuppet, thanks. My hub is definitely the "senior" model with 36 holes -- I've repacked it several times, and just replaced one bearing cone, getting lucky with an eBay find. It was on my main bike for a long time -- a rusted heap that my college roommate found in his family's barn. Maybe 20 years ago, I noticed that one of the brake shoes was chipped, and the bike shop sold me four shoes -- each is half the size of the original shoe, and they fit into the original position exactly.

I wonder if the choice of grease plays a role. I'd hate to start a grease thread, but right now I use from a tub of marine bearing grease, and haven't thought about whether a different grease would change the braking action. On the other hand, those Shimano hubs are eminently affordable, and I might just have to get one for the sake of curiosity.

Do you know anything about the interchangeability of the cogs on the E110? I have several Sturmey Archer cogs. They don't fit on the Bendix -- slightly different diameters --, but I wonder if they would fit on the Shimano.
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Old 07-29-17, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
@SquidPuppet, thanks. My hub is definitely the "senior" model with 36 holes -- I've repacked it several times, and just replaced one bearing cone, getting lucky with an eBay find. It was on my main bike for a long time -- a rusted heap that my college roommate found in his family's barn. Maybe 20 years ago, I noticed that one of the brake shoes was chipped, and the bike shop sold me four shoes -- each is half the size of the original shoe, and they fit into the original position exactly.

I wonder if the choice of grease plays a role. I'd hate to start a grease thread, but right now I use from a tub of marine bearing grease, and haven't thought about whether a different grease would change the braking action. On the other hand, those Shimano hubs are eminently affordable, and I might just have to get one for the sake of curiosity.

Do you know anything about the interchangeability of the cogs on the E110? I have several Sturmey Archer cogs. They don't fit on the Bendix -- slightly different diameters --, but I wonder if they would fit on the Shimano.

As long as it's a three prong sprocket, it will most likely fit. There are a few brands that will fit. But here too, the Shimano sprockets are readily available and dirt cheap.

On the grease subject. If it's NLGI#2, that marine grease is fine. I have found that the secret to strong braking, and to a greater extent, good modulation, is not what grease you use, but the volume. I discovered that packing the clutch-to-shoe-to-hub shell interface causes multiple issues. Sometimes the shoes don't want to float down the ramps once the braking pressure has been released, causing drag and noise. Long ago I noticed a huge braking difference between two identical (essentially, gear inches and weight) bikes. This prompted me to look for a cause and a cure. Because of what I was hearing and feeling, I suspected the internals weren't free enough to move around as they should be. I serviced the hub on the poorly braking bike and only applied a film to the clutch exterior, both sides of the shoes, and the hub shell interior. A generous film, yes, but there was no packing like we do with bearings. Viola! The shoes float freely up and down the ramps between clutch and shell. Just enough grease to prevent the shoes from rattling when riding on rough surfaces, and GOBS of power and wonderfully linear modulation. Just enough grease to lubricate and discourage rust. I began doing this to every hub I ever serviced over the years and it has always delivered superior results to the traditional mindset of "Too much is never enough" in a coaster hub. Give it a shot, it might be a contributing factor in the Bendix hub as well.
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Old 07-29-17, 12:30 PM
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@SquidPuppet, I certainly loaded up on grease. Maybe I'll try getting most of it out of there, as an experiment.

Rebuilding a Bendix is one of the first things I learned about bikes from my dad when I was a kid. That, and fixing a flat.
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Old 12-16-18, 02:26 PM
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bringing a thread back from the dead

I have found this thread very useful in conjunction with the details at the Late Great Sheldon Brown's website. https://www.sheldonbrown.com/coaster-brakes.html

My question is specific to a Shimano coaster brake (single speed) hub losing engagement in the forward pedaling direction. Intermittently, inconsistently and not repeatably (i guess inconsistent would cover that....).
The S.B. page mentions a 'retarder' spring about midway through the above linked page. The Shimano exploded view doesn't show it, but if I remember from my re-pack last spring, it's in the #11 Driver: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/coaster...no-cb-e110.jpg

I think my re-pack last spring could be causing the problem, and that's where I'm asking for advice. -- Could cold temperatures and too much thick grease cause some drag in getting the driver to engage?
Which would them cause me to step on nothing (free spinning forward) as the driver tries to engage - it's never happened standing on the pedals, thankfully!
Before I read the helpful @SquidPuppet comments about NOT using too much grease, I repacked my hub full with thick, high temp wheel bearing grease. I suspect this is the reason I get the occasional knocking sound as the brake shoes un-stick. And maybe cause the driver to stick as well.
Let me know what you think.
Maybe this could be made into a sticky thread for coaster brakes.
(yes, I know. that was pretty funny. sticky thread. funny.)
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Old 12-16-18, 11:27 PM
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Just lurking here, since I'm interested in the answer. I was extremely lucky to score a CB-E110 on eBay for a buck, plus 7 bucks shipping. It's on a bike now, and I can attest that it runs like a dream. I'm using the aforementioned "marine" grease from Home Depot, but was somewhat sparing with it as @SquidPuppet suggested.
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Old 12-17-18, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by mrv View Post
I have found this thread very useful in conjunction with the details at the Late Great Sheldon Brown's website. https://www.sheldonbrown.com/coaster-brakes.html

My question is specific to a Shimano coaster brake (single speed) hub losing engagement in the forward pedaling direction. Intermittently, inconsistently and not repeatably (i guess inconsistent would cover that....).
The S.B. page mentions a 'retarder' spring about midway through the above linked page. The Shimano exploded view doesn't show it, but if I remember from my re-pack last spring, it's in the #11 Driver: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/coaster...no-cb-e110.jpg

I think my re-pack last spring could be causing the problem, and that's where I'm asking for advice. -- Could cold temperatures and too much thick grease cause some drag in getting the driver to engage?
Which would them cause me to step on nothing (free spinning forward) as the driver tries to engage - it's never happened standing on the pedals, thankfully!
Before I read the helpful @SquidPuppet comments about NOT using too much grease, I repacked my hub full with thick, high temp wheel bearing grease. I suspect this is the reason I get the occasional knocking sound as the brake shoes un-stick. And maybe cause the driver to stick as well.
Let me know what you think.
Maybe this could be made into a sticky thread for coaster brakes.
(yes, I know. that was pretty funny. sticky thread. funny.)
If the clutch spring spins freely inside the the clutch cone unit it will cause the problem that you are experiencing. It can/may also cause braking issues. It must be difficult to rotate by hand. It could also be that the engagement "Teeth" on the outside of the clutch cone are worn down. Full clutch assemblies are easy to source and inexpensive, thankfully.

Walmart etc etc etc $5.18

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Old 03-06-19, 05:46 PM
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this is a awesome post... so Is there a better drum brake persay vs just your well kept coaster brake.

Im not big on riding in traffic nor do I have any hills In Miami unless im going over a bridge perhaps, but wouldnt mind a more durable break like a coaster or is the shimano coaster thats well kept just as good as any other option ( I have it in fixie mode and its not really comfortable here in Miami need a little more than me legs for a stop or slowing down before i hit my front break. (which I dont have yet either as I like the fixie look with out cables).

Props for all the knowledge on these takes me back to the youth days catching some coaster break action.
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Old 03-06-19, 07:20 PM
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"Better drum brake" is an oxymoron. If you care about stopping, get a front brake.
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Old 03-06-19, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by phobus View Post
"Better drum brake" is an oxymoron. If you care about stopping, get a front brake.
^^ this. Basic math and physics will show you that a nothing special front break will stop you in half the distance as the world's best rear. I never remember to save the calcs, but every time I re-do them I get the same answer.

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