Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Carbon Dropbar? Yay or nay?

Old 01-16-18, 06:27 PM
  #51  
nightfly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,220
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie View Post
Also, using a carbon bar with a quill stem would be courting disaster.
Curious why. Would think quill stems usually have softer rounded edges and more even clamping pressure than a removable faceplate stem which tend to have more defined edges and possibility of tightening bolts more unevenly.

Because usually narrower clamping area and less distribution of clamping force?

Not only idly curious, have some Easton 25.4 Carbon Monkey bars in a quill stem right now.
nightfly is offline  
Old 01-16-18, 06:34 PM
  #52  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,146

Bikes: 29 frames + 72 wheels

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 663 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by nightfly View Post
Curious why. Would think quill stems usually have softer rounded edges and more even clamping pressure than a removable faceplate stem which tend to have more defined edges and possibility of tightening bolts more unevenly.

Because usually narrower clamping area and less distribution of clamping force?

Not only idly curious, have some Easton 25.4 Carbon Monkey bars in a quill stem right now.
A quill stem uses a single bolt to bend the clamping area to secure it to the bar. This causes unequal pressure on the bar, which can cause serious problems with carbon bars.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 01-31-18, 12:45 PM
  #53  
Dr Bikenstien
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm looking into the carbon aerobars. They look pretty decent for the price.
Dr Bikenstien is offline  
Old 02-01-18, 01:03 PM
  #54  
Scrodzilla
See you in Hell.
 
Scrodzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South of Heaven
Posts: 25,947

Bikes: EAI Bare Knuckle

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 573 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by nightfly View Post
Not only idly curious, have some Easton 25.4 Carbon Monkey bars in a quill stem right now.
Wide carbon risers in a quill stem is an even worse idea.
Scrodzilla is offline  
Old 02-01-18, 02:00 PM
  #55  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 6,897

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1639 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 60 Times in 51 Posts
A caution for aluminum bars. They don't last forever. They will fail. That is a given. Sturdy bars from reputable manufacturers go a very long ways, but they fail also. The question is when, not if.

I will ride only aluminum bars. I choose them primarily for the bends I like. Many of my favorite bends I don't see new. When I happen across an used one, I buy it. As soon as I stop trusting what I am riding (odd sounds or even just a gut feeling) it comes off. I trusted the TTTs I bought new decades ago a lot and put many, many miles on them but I will no longer ride TTT simply because the bends I like will be not much newer than my old ones and I know nothing or their histories. A cheap SR probably has fewer miles on it. Also probably thicker, softer and more forgiving alloy.

Aluminum alloy. Older, softer alloys were a lot more forgiving re: sudden failure and often gave warning and/or did not fail entirely. (I bent a circa 1970 GB HB I was given well used when I hit a deep pothole. It bent 30 degrees at the reinforcing sleeve. With the newer and stronger/usually thinner, lighter the HBs, the sooner they get the poor gut feel and replacement because a sudden break and fist in the spokes is one of those accidents I'd rather skip.

Handlebars are in one important way, a lot like forks. Cantilever beams with no "redundancy". In other words, no supporting anything so when they break, you lose all support keeping you off the road. Airplane wings. You kinda want them in one piece.

Little story: The HBs on my custom fix gear started creaking when I climbed. I did some tweaking with the stem, then rode the two miles with its small, kinda steep hill to the local velodrome to watch an event. Started creaking a lot on that climb. Looked when I go there and thought I could see a small crack. No way was I riding back down that hill to the stop sign at the bottom. I sent word to the PA announcer that I had a bike issue and needed a ride home. Loaded my bike in a racer's pickup. Not an earthshaking message - just pointing out I really do take not breaking HBs seriously.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 12:03 AM
  #56  
vettracer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 209
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Threads like this are interesting.

How many here who would prefer an aluminum handle bar over a carbon handlebar would prefer an aluminum fork over a carbon fork? I am guessing not many.

Perception is everything.
vettracer is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 09:21 AM
  #57  
Scrodzilla
See you in Hell.
 
Scrodzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South of Heaven
Posts: 25,947

Bikes: EAI Bare Knuckle

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 573 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by vettracer View Post
Threads like this are interesting.

How many here who would prefer an aluminum handle bar over a carbon handlebar would prefer an aluminum fork over a carbon fork? I am guessing not many.

Perception is everything.
That's not the same thing at all. Fork material has much more direct impact on ride quality. Aluminum forks generally provide a very harsh ride on the road, which is why people don't like them.
Scrodzilla is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 09:52 AM
  #58  
phobus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: South FL
Posts: 270
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by vettracer View Post
Threads like this are interesting.

How many here who would prefer an aluminum handle bar over a carbon handlebar would prefer an aluminum fork over a carbon fork? I am guessing not many.

Perception is everything.
They might prefer an aluminum steerer tube over carbon. Is that what you meant?
phobus is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 02:27 PM
  #59  
vettracer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 209
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
That's not the same thing at all. Fork material has much more direct impact on ride quality. Aluminum forks generally provide a very harsh ride on the road, which is why people don't like them.
Actually it is more the same than it is not. Fork Design has more impact than material type (Steel, Aluminum, or Carbon) Same with Handlebars.

Perceptions around forks and handlebars dominate decisions in the absence of data (Carbon Fork > Aluminum Fork) Aluminum Handlebar > Carbon Handlebar)
vettracer is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 02:30 PM
  #60  
vettracer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 209
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by phobus View Post
They might prefer an aluminum steerer tube over carbon. Is that what you meant?
I certainly hope not, Aluminum steerers in carbon forks are a bad idea. Dissimilar materials, galvanic corrosion, insulating fiberglass layers, stress concentrations, no thank you.
vettracer is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 02:42 PM
  #61  
Scrodzilla
See you in Hell.
 
Scrodzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South of Heaven
Posts: 25,947

Bikes: EAI Bare Knuckle

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 573 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So ridiculous. Carbon forks with aluminum steerers are extremely common. Almost as common as the bike nerds who would rather over-think bikes than ride them.
Scrodzilla is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 03:01 PM
  #62  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: PHL
Posts: 9,604

Bikes: Litespeed, IRO

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1170 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 47 Posts
I guess carbon forks in aluminum frames is a bad idea too. And metal dropouts, bottom bracket shells, and bolts of any kind should definitely not go anywhere near a carbon frame.
seau grateau is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 03:23 PM
  #63  
phobus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: South FL
Posts: 270
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by vettracer View Post
I certainly hope not, Aluminum steerers in carbon forks are a bad idea. Dissimilar materials, galvanic corrosion, insulating fiberglass layers, stress concentrations, no thank you.
Now you're just trolling. Galvanic corrosion between carbon and aluminum?

phobus is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 03:31 PM
  #64  
UltraManDan
Senior Member
 
UltraManDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 409

Bikes: 2015 Aventon Diamond

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had to google it, and even after googling it, I have no clue what this has to do with carbon and aluminum being used on bikes...

Galvanic corrosion (also called bimetallic corrosion) is an electrochemical process in which one metal corrodes preferentially when it is in electrical contact with another, in the presence of an electrolyte.
UltraManDan is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 03:49 PM
  #65  
Scrodzilla
See you in Hell.
 
Scrodzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South of Heaven
Posts: 25,947

Bikes: EAI Bare Knuckle

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 573 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Scrodzilla is offline  
Old 02-02-18, 04:33 PM
  #66  
vettracer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 209
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by phobus View Post
Now you're just trolling. Galvanic corrosion between carbon and aluminum?

Well yeah I kind of am. I am just trying to point out that there are good engineering designs and poor engineering designs. just because poor engineering designs are common does not make them good engineering designs. A full carbon fork is a much better egineering design than one with an aluminum steerer.



Taken from Aero 07 - Design for Corrosion

Galvanic coupling of materials.
Boeing groups materials into four categories (table 1) of differing galvanic properties. The objective is to avoid coupling materials from different groups unless required by economic and weight considerations. If dissimilar metal coupling is required, proper finishing and sealing techniques and guidelines are used to prevent corrosion.

For example, graphite fibers, which are used to reinforce some plastic structure, present a particularly challenging galvanic corrosion combination. The fibers are good electrical conductors and they produce a large galvanic potential with the aluminum alloys used in airplane structure. The only practical, effective method of preventing corrosion is to keep moisture from simultaneously contacting aluminum structure and carbon fibers by finishing, sealing, using durable isolating materials such as fiberglass, and providing drainage. Figure 14 shows the 777 carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) floor beam design and corrosion-protection methods. An aluminum splice channel is used to avoid attaching the floor beam directly to the primary structural frame.


Back to the original thread, Carbon bars are awesome, I have them on a couple of bikes. Aluminum bars are awesome, I have them on a couple of my other bikes as well. I also have bikes with Steel , aluminum, and carbon forks.

That said, my best riding bike is carbon frame, full carbon fork, and carbon handle bar. But my most ridden bike is steel frame, aluminum handle bar (quill stem) and steel fork, because it looks better.
vettracer is offline  
Old 02-03-18, 12:32 PM
  #67  
SquidPuppet
Calamari Marionette Ph.D
 
SquidPuppet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Coeur d' Alene
Posts: 7,944

Bikes: 3 Chinese Gas Pipe Nerdcycles and 2 Chicago Electroforged Boat Anchors

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2346 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by UltraManDan View Post
I had to google it, and even after googling it, I have no clue what this has to do with carbon and aluminum being used on bikes...
Bikes, airplanes, etc. Seems weird, but it's real. And a problem that must be addressed during design.

Boeing explains....Aero 07 - Design for Corrosion

Last edited by SquidPuppet; 02-04-18 at 10:56 AM.
SquidPuppet is offline  
Old 02-03-18, 08:39 PM
  #68  
moochems 
Member
 
moochems's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had a set of XLC aluminum trekking bars snap under me one day. I was basically fine, a little disappointed that the bars had to be replaced (basket, controls, bell, light swap) though.

The aluminum bars broke, so yeah stuff breaks. I did replace them with an old steel handlebar though!
__________________
You aren't what you think you are. What you think, you are.

Marcus Aurelius?

A drop of honey beats a gallon of gal

Lincoln!

Forgive seventy times seven.

Jesus.
moochems is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Birthday
Introductions
2
09-16-12 06:02 PM
info
Foo
2
03-28-09 12:25 AM
yellowjeep
Foo
0
10-22-08 11:10 PM
shabbasuraj
Road Cycling
0
06-06-08 12:54 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.