Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Palm pressure

Reply

Old 10-07-18, 04:00 PM
  #1  
thehammerdog
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
thehammerdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NWNJ
Posts: 2,479

Bikes: Road bike is a Carbon Bianchi C2C & Grandis (1980's), Gary Fisher Mt Bike, Trek Tandem & Mongoose SS MTB circa 1992.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
Palm pressure

Bike is set up with good size drop from seat to bars and riding becomes hard on hands is the aggressive drop thr issue, set up similar to road bike anyone suffering like me?
thehammerdog is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-18, 06:00 PM
  #2  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 4,654

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (that will soon have DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 952 Post(s)
Probably. Don't ride an uncomfortable bike. Who the flying frederick cares if your stem is slammed and you are super aero, bro? If you aren't comfortable on the bike it doesn't matter what any other dipstick says it's not their bike and they don't have to ride it. Go see a fitter and see what they say about your position and component choices as far as bar, stem and saddle. Be comfortable and fk dem hateaz.

Me personally I don't mind some headset spacers especially when I can match frame colors or components or just be comfortable. If I cannot ride my bikes then what is all of this for?
veganbikes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-18, 06:55 PM
  #3  
zubes5280
Senior Member
 
zubes5280's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 57

Bikes: Cinelli Mash Histogram, Raleigh Tokul 3, All-City Macho Man

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
An aggressive drop alone doesn't usually cause pain on your palms. Having too much weight on your hands caused palm pains. Make sure your saddle is level and is comfortable enough to put the majority of your weight on most of the time, then address handle bar drop if that doesn't fix the pain.
zubes5280 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-18, 10:19 PM
  #4  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: LA
Posts: 9,259

Bikes: Shogun Selectra, Felt TK2, Ridley Fenix AL

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1024 Post(s)
What kind of handlebar setup? Pics?
seau grateau is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-18, 11:34 PM
  #5  
seamuis
aire díthrub
 
seamuis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: chatham
Posts: 300

Bikes: Raleigh Competition, Pashley Roadster Sovereign, Cielo Sportif Classic, Mercian Vincitore Speciale

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Nobody can actually be of any true help, without a pretty broad range of information about your setup, your riding style, your bike frame size and your body size/demensions. Even how you place your hands, and wether or not you reposition often are all vitally important information. All of which, a good, properly trained bike fitter will use to help you. The best anyone could do here, is throw out opinions based on insufficient information. I will second the idea of providing some photos of your bike, even better if you could provide a profile photo of yourself, on the bike, as we might get lucky in being able to spot any obvious problems.
seamuis is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-18, 11:42 PM
  #6  
Mikefule
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Personally, I'm a little sceptical about "bike fitters" as it sounds like Feng Shui to me. We all have different styles and preferences, and different body proportions. There are a few simple rules/guides and after that it's a combination of experimental adjustments and riding more until the problem goes away.

I used to have a big thing about pain in my hands and chose a bike with a frame that gave a high bar position, and I even flipped then stem. I found it was slow and that I got discomfort in other areas. I now have that bike set up with the bars as low as they'll go and prefer it. Yes, I get discomfort in the hands but I deal with that by changing my hand position between "on the tops", on the bends, on the hoods and, rarely, on the hooks.

If you're pedalling hard then the natural "equal and opposite reaction" to the pedalling action will tend to lift your upper body reducing the weight on your hands very slightly. Also, concentrate on having a bend in your elbows. It feels easier to let your elbows "lock out" so you can just flop your bodyweight onto them, but that slight bend reduces the transmission of shock to your hands and makes them less uncomfortable.

Most of all, the more you ride, the less you'll think about it.
Mikefule is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-18, 12:48 AM
  #7  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 6,086

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1298 Post(s)
For me, the details of how my hands sit on the bars makes a very big difference. I take any new bike out for rides with no tape on the bars and all the tools until they pass the comfort test. I ride with real weight on my hands and have for many years. I also have dropped handlebars on all my bikes, brakes and levers//hoods on all my bikes, more than half of which are fix gears. I dial my bikes in by getting the handlebar rotation right to make the drops all day comfortable (for my hands; not necessarily my back!) so if I have to go upwind for hours I can. Only then do I fuss with dialing in the lever position. Then, with several good hand positions, I can change up those positions regularly as I ride.

I am fussy about the details of the handlebar and lever shape. There are a lot of each I simply stay away from. (I've acquired the experience re: those shapes via the 5 decades of riding I've done. The flip side is that with those decades comes a body far less tolerant of so-so fits.) Ride, play with the setup and observe. Your setup will evolve. Quite likely to something not quite like anyone else's. That doesn't matter if it works for you,

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-18, 08:11 PM
  #8  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 4,654

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (that will soon have DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 952 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Personally, I'm a little sceptical about "bike fitters" as it sounds like Feng Shui to me. We all have different styles and preferences, and different body proportions. There are a few simple rules/guides and after that it's a combination of experimental adjustments and riding more until the problem goes away.

I used to have a big thing about pain in my hands and chose a bike with a frame that gave a high bar position, and I even flipped then stem. I found it was slow and that I got discomfort in other areas. I now have that bike set up with the bars as low as they'll go and prefer it. Yes, I get discomfort in the hands but I deal with that by changing my hand position between "on the tops", on the bends, on the hoods and, rarely, on the hooks.

If you're pedalling hard then the natural "equal and opposite reaction" to the pedalling action will tend to lift your upper body reducing the weight on your hands very slightly. Also, concentrate on having a bend in your elbows. It feels easier to let your elbows "lock out" so you can just flop your bodyweight onto them, but that slight bend reduces the transmission of shock to your hands and makes them less uncomfortable.

Most of all, the more you ride, the less you'll think about it.
One of my friends is a bike fitter and he fit me on my road bike and that made a world of difference and helped me realize things I didn't and made me more comfortable. I was already reasonably comfortable but didn't know I could have been way more comfortable as I am now.

Sure everyone is a bit different but a good fitter can realize that and make changes and suggestions based on that. You can do some trial and error stuff but a good fitter can real dial you in all over and really watch you pedaling and some can go really deep into it with computers and such.

It is way more than just some voodoo magic or just being Feng Shui as you mentioned. There is a lot of training that goes into it at least if you want to be good at your job and get certified. We are developing a fit studio at my company and our fitter has been doing it a while at other shops but has to go back and get re-certified so he is current and keeps at the top of his game. Kind of like a doctor.
veganbikes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-18, 01:27 PM
  #9  
thehammerdog
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
thehammerdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NWNJ
Posts: 2,479

Bikes: Road bike is a Carbon Bianchi C2C & Grandis (1980's), Gary Fisher Mt Bike, Trek Tandem & Mongoose SS MTB circa 1992.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)


This is bike needs some adjusting only used 3-4 rides

Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
What kind of handlebar setup? Pics?
thehammerdog is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-18, 02:40 PM
  #10  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: LA
Posts: 9,259

Bikes: Shogun Selectra, Felt TK2, Ridley Fenix AL

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1024 Post(s)
The reach looks really short for that amount of drop. Could be part of your problem.
seau grateau is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-18, 02:46 PM
  #11  
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 37,285

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1510 Post(s)
Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
The reach looks really short for that amount of drop. Could be part of your problem.
Agree.
caloso is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-18, 05:58 PM
  #12  
thehammerdog
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
thehammerdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NWNJ
Posts: 2,479

Bikes: Road bike is a Carbon Bianchi C2C & Grandis (1980's), Gary Fisher Mt Bike, Trek Tandem & Mongoose SS MTB circa 1992.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
Yes I tend to agree not sure how to set it up as wanna ride mostly in drops and having issues getting it dialed in
thehammerdog is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-18, 06:15 PM
  #13  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: LA
Posts: 9,259

Bikes: Shogun Selectra, Felt TK2, Ridley Fenix AL

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1024 Post(s)
I'd try a longer stem first. Like a lot longer. Probably with a positive rise considering how high your saddle is, and maybe a compact drop bar if you're going to be spending a lot of time in the drops. Looking at all that seatpost, I feel like it could be the case that the frame is too small for you. This is all guess-work of course.
seau grateau is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-18, 10:19 AM
  #14  
nightfly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,209
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
I usually mess with my fixed gears myself but on my road bike I had a proper fitting and it is not BS. I was totally skeptical but the guy I worked with was no joke and I love how my road bike fits. Made a big difference.

I sometimes do bike tours on rented bikes in various places and I'm always happy to get back on my own bike. The bikes I rent are nice, sometimes significantly nicer than my bike, but the fit is always approximate even if I bring my measurements off my bike at home. It does make a difference.

Regarding the OP. I've had problems with palm pressure before and a lot of times it's from being not stretched out enough. If you're too upright, your core works more and inevitably tires and you end up supporting yourself with your hands.
nightfly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-18, 11:37 AM
  #15  
seamuis
aire díthrub
 
seamuis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: chatham
Posts: 300

Bikes: Raleigh Competition, Pashley Roadster Sovereign, Cielo Sportif Classic, Mercian Vincitore Speciale

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
How tall are you? And do you have longer legs or a longer torso? What’s your inseam length? Unless you’re riding a time trial bike, or you have freakishly long legs for your height, you shouldn’t have that much seatpost. I think it’s pretty likely that your frame is several sizes too small for you and you’re likely putting far too much of your body weight forward onto your bars. I’m not really sure why you want to spend most of your time in the drops, unless all you’re doing is sprinting, but I wouldn’t recommend this. If you insist, I would insist on getting bars with more shallow drops. But honestly, I think you need to be looking for a larger frame. I’m sure that’s not what you’d like to hear, but I’d have a real hard time believing that’s not your primary issue.
seamuis is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-18, 12:30 PM
  #16  
LesterOfPuppets
cowboy, steel horse, etc
 
LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Rock Springs, WY
Posts: 31,443

Bikes: everywhere

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3254 Post(s)
Originally Posted by thehammerdog View Post
Bike is set up with good size drop from seat to bars and riding becomes hard on hands is the aggressive drop thr issue, set up similar to road bike anyone suffering like me?
How about a pic of the road bike?
LesterOfPuppets is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-18, 05:33 AM
  #17  
thehammerdog
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
thehammerdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NWNJ
Posts: 2,479

Bikes: Road bike is a Carbon Bianchi C2C & Grandis (1980's), Gary Fisher Mt Bike, Trek Tandem & Mongoose SS MTB circa 1992.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
I was not clear in original post the palm pain is from riding on top of bar in drops is fine.
longer higher stem maybe is answer but longer makes holding drops more difficult i am
just stuck. I have good flexibility in legs and back but reach is my problem. Bike was chesp craigslist buy correct size in height TT stem bars are issue fun to ride but not comfy
thehammerdog is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-18, 05:40 AM
  #18  
LesterOfPuppets
cowboy, steel horse, etc
 
LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Rock Springs, WY
Posts: 31,443

Bikes: everywhere

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3254 Post(s)
Originally Posted by thehammerdog View Post
I was not clear in original post the palm pain is from riding on top of bar in drops is fine.
longer higher stem maybe is answer but longer makes holding drops more difficult i am
just stuck. I have good flexibility in legs and back but reach is my problem. Bike was chesp craigslist buy correct size in height TT stem bars are issue fun to ride but not comfy
If drops are comfy but tops suck, then I guess I'd try getting some hoods on there and see if that position works.

Which stem are you currently using? The stubby or the longer one?
LesterOfPuppets is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-18, 08:30 AM
  #19  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: LA
Posts: 9,259

Bikes: Shogun Selectra, Felt TK2, Ridley Fenix AL

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1024 Post(s)
If you think that frame is the right size for you...well, have fun.
seau grateau is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-18, 12:27 PM
  #20  
AlmostTrick
Yabba-Dabba-Doo!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bedrock, IL
Posts: 6,153

Bikes: 1968 Schwinn Orange Krate, Raleigh Roper road bike, Wabi Special fixed gear

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 824 Post(s)

Jack the stem up too... so it matches the extra long seat post!
AlmostTrick is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-18, 02:47 PM
  #21  
50voltphantom
Senior Member
 
50voltphantom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: SD
Posts: 2,574

Bikes: Surly Steamroller, Handsome Fredward

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 426 Post(s)
Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
I'd try a longer stem first. Like a lot longer. Probably with a positive rise considering how high your saddle is, and maybe a compact drop bar if you're going to be spending a lot of time in the drops. Looking at all that seatpost, I feel like it could be the case that the frame is too small for you. This is all guess-work of course.
I completely agree with the longer stem. Maybe also try tilting the the nose of your saddle up slightly. I went through a similar process when I started riding again.
50voltphantom is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-18, 05:37 PM
  #22  
bbattle
.
 
bbattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Rocket City, No'ala
Posts: 12,700

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 5.2, 1985 Pinarello Trevisio, 1991 Colnago Master, '06 Bianchi San Jose, 1987 Moulton Fuso, 1990 Gardin Shred, '82 John Howard(Dave Tesch)

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Get on your bike, hands on the handlebars. You should be able to remove your hands from the bars with no change in position. If not, your set up has you too far forward and/or your core strength needs improvement.

Yeah, that bike seems too small for you. That drop is ridiculous, even by boneless pro cyclists' standards.

Push the saddle back and down a bit(visualize an arc; if you move saddle back, you must also lower it to remain on the arc. As said, you could get a longer stem, too.

As others said, you can tilt the nose of the saddle up just a bit. The part that your sitbones are on should be flat and right now, it's tilted a bit forward.

Back in the day, the cool dudes all rode with their handlebars rotated back 180 degrees.

It worked for Graeme Obree.
__________________
Bicycle Pictures
bbattle is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-18, 08:49 PM
  #23  
Bikerider007 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 2,278
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 395 Post(s)
Slide saddle back, may have to lower post a tiny bit when you move back. If not the longer stem is next option.
__________________
Never lose your sense of humor, ability to change and want to learn.
-RDR-
Bikerider007 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-18, 01:01 PM
  #24  
Butthash
Gold Member
 
Butthash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Humboldt County, CA
Posts: 471
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post

Jack the stem up too... so it matches the extra long seat post!
I have some uncomfortable positions on my upper back, and sometimes hands, (However, ir may just be me because I've got m9re back issues than guns and ammo)even in risers right now, and I'm pretty sure I'm soon going to get a new fork with some spacers(I need a new fork for my new front tyre anyways) or one of those*or a new stem), but I'm not sure, because I don't really like how those things look with the extra, unnecessary part, but it's not a fashion show so I may as well when I have a bit o cash.
When buying my frame, I did pay attention to the geometry written on the site, but for my leg positions, I needed the seat higher.
Think one of these would benefit me,

(ignore the dragging fender, it slipps at times)


OP. Have you tried riding gloves to help with hand comfort? They seem to work wonders for me.

Last edited by Butthash; 10-16-18 at 01:08 PM. Reason: Typos
Butthash is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-18, 01:12 PM
  #25  
AlmostTrick
Yabba-Dabba-Doo!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bedrock, IL
Posts: 6,153

Bikes: 1968 Schwinn Orange Krate, Raleigh Roper road bike, Wabi Special fixed gear

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 824 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Butthash View Post
I have some uncomfortable positions on my upper back, and sometimes hands, even in risers right now, and I'm pretty sure I'm soon going to get a new fork with some spacers(I need a new fork for my new front tyre anyways) or one of those, but I'm not sure, because I don't realky like how those things look with the extra, unnecessary part, but it's not a fashion show so I may as well when I have a bit o cash.
When buying my frame, I did pay attention to the geometry written on the site, but for my leg positions, I needed the seat higher.
Because most people don't like the way the extender looks, I posted it mostly in jest. But then again if it makes riding comfortable for you, then yes, 'fashion' be damned.

I have long legs/ short upper body, and have learned to size my frames per the leg, avoiding the situation you are in now. Stems can always be swapped to adjust the reach. I have one bike now that looks like yours that I will end up selling since I can't ride it for long.
AlmostTrick is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service