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dura ace 7710 low flange rear hubfix/fix

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dura ace 7710 low flange rear hubfix/fix

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Old 06-23-05, 10:48 PM
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bejay
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dura ace 7710 low flange rear hubfix/fix

hey does anyone have this hub and could give some feed back im looking for an affordable solid rear hub thats threaded fixed/fixed

thanks
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Old 06-23-05, 10:55 PM
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baxtefer
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can't go wrong with DA. hmmmm only $110, I thought they'd cost more...
If you want more affordable, you could always go for a IRO or a Nashbar.
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Old 06-23-05, 11:14 PM
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Mine have endured rain, snow, curbs, and crashes with no problems.
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Old 06-23-05, 11:42 PM
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my dura ace low flange has lasted me 2+ years without having to be adjusted once, i like it better than phil or campy (both of which i own)... buying a DA is an investment because if you buy a surly or nashbar or suzue or whatever, it will never adjust as good or spins as smooth as the DA, and it will be less likely to strip out or have problems. as far as hubs go DA has one up on everyone. so well machined, just imagine the best ninja swords the best hubs, good metal work. i go with campy for cranks,pedals, seatposts, and headsets however.
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Old 06-24-05, 07:44 AM
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Very smooth, very solid. And the cog threading is nicely done, so it's less prone to stripping (and it's not ISO threading either, if you've been following some of the other threads here -- use a Dura Ace, Phil, or EAI cog and it'll never strip on you).

Do note that it comes with this rather junky grease on the bearings. It's definitely worth the effort to pull the hubs apart and do a quick lube job with a better grease (Phil grease, for example).
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Old 06-24-05, 07:00 PM
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Two of my fixies use Dura Ace track hubs. I bought the last one new off eBay for $89.
They are wonderful.
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Old 06-24-05, 07:07 PM
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I bought a wheelset with these laced 36spoke to Alex DV15s not too long ago. I didn't think that the rear had gotten gritty riding in the wet weather and stuff until I bought the front to match a few months later. THEN I noticed that the rear needs re-packed. I still haven't gotten to that yet, and a month later it's still smoother than any other wheel I've ridden (but they were mostly Surlys)

Couple quick questions of my own -

Do the bearings have cages, or should I have some extras on hand if I'm going to re-pack it (I tend to lose small round things) What size bearings if they're loose?

As far as the non-iso - I'm running a DA 16t on one side and a Suntour 14t on the other (ancient and beefy) Is the Suntour the same threading as the DA? I'd hate to think of that side stripping...
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Old 06-24-05, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by HereNT
As far as the non-iso - I'm running a DA 16t on one side and a Suntour 14t on the other (ancient and beefy) Is the Suntour the same threading as the DA? I'd hate to think of that side stripping...
That Suntour cog will never be happy on a Shimano hub.
Shimano and Suntour were competing companies and Shimano won.
Buy that cog a nice Superbe pro to live on and it will be happy for a long time.
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Old 06-24-05, 08:50 PM
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HereNT, the bearings are loose. They tend not to fall out too easily; in fact, you usually need a hemostat or something like that to pull the last ones out. They are a standard size (I don't remember which, but your local shop can tell you), and I just bought a hundred-count bag of each (for front and for rear) at a local industrial supply. I just replace them every time I repack the hubs. Easy.

And forget the Suntour cog. Icithecat isn't joking. The threading is close but not quite. After a few on-off cycles, misfitting cogs will gradually plane off the lands of the threading and suddenly it strips out. Frankly, for how long they last, I don't know anything better than an EAI cog. Cogs aren't just about the threading -- it's also about how well the threads are cut, and the EAI are pretty much the best out there (Phil may give them a run if they ever get released).
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Old 06-24-05, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by icithecat
That Suntour cog will never be happy on a Shimano hub.
Shimano and Suntour were competing companies and Shimano won.
Buy that cog a nice Superbe pro to live on and it will be happy for a long time.
That's what I was worried about. Hopefully I didn't strip the threads putting it on, or strip them taking it off... It's just such a nice, beefy cog

I was going to go from 14/16 to 15/17 anyways...

[edit]
Cool, I'll just get more bearings when I re-pack. It's kind of weird with the suntour, though - I've never had an easy time getting that one off of my Surly hubs in the past, or stripped it. I have spun off a DA cog and stripped the threads, though...

I gotta go buy a hemostat now? Damn. Still, that's better than the hubs that came with my bike, where as soon as you took off the cap, everything fell on the floor and rolled off into oblivion...
[/edit]
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