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Essor Aerodash Crankset or other affordable crankset

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Essor Aerodash Crankset or other affordable crankset

Old 05-14-19, 01:33 PM
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Huddybear60
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Essor Aerodash Crankset or other affordable crankset

Hey All,

I am looking for an affordable crankset for my fixed gear. I am a Clydesdale so a stiffer crank would be good. I am interested in the Aerodash because of the interesting full body spider design is interesting and a lot cheaper than other of those styles. I was wondering if anyone has experience with the Aerodash?
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Old 05-15-19, 12:15 PM
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Haven't ever encountered them in the wild, and can't find any reviews of them online. They might be fine cranks, but the absence of any opinion on them definitely would give me pause.
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Old 05-16-19, 01:32 PM
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I was going to wait until someone that actually owns these commented, but i'll thrown in my 2 cents about the generality of parts.
They look like omniums with a disc instead of a spider.
Outboard bearings, both are made of forged 7075, etc.

By generality of machining (and my limited knowledge about the fixed gear world, and general knowledge about the bmx world).
when two things are at the same price point, they usually wont have anything about them that makes them outrageously different from one another. They are all machined using basically the same machines, with the same materials.
When they do something extra special, it costs a lot more because more human effort or more specialized machinery or better materials are required.
Mostly, they will simply have either aesthetic differences, or some design differences.
(Like how the aerodash has a disc, and omniums have a spider, some cranks are 2 piece, others are 3, etc.). A lot of those differences make them "better" than the other because of the personal preference of the rider.

Once in a great while, someone comes up with a design or engineering process, and finds the right machinery to make something really special and different from everything else at that price point (Like H Plus Sons).
That's rare, and if it was true here, you would have probably heard about it. Whenever I see things like that, they get rave reviews by like every publication and everyone buys them.
If it's wildly different from other parts in a bad way, everyone finds out because their cranks are snapping left and right and the design was just horrible. Again, you would have heard about it.

That being said, go with what you think works best for your riding style, and what you think looks the best for your bike. You probably wont' notice a massive difference from something similar, but for just a taaad more, you can get something that is well known to be a very good crankset.

Last edited by BicycleBicycle; 05-16-19 at 01:42 PM.
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Old 05-21-19, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by BicycleBicycle View Post
Once in a great while, someone comes up with a design or engineering process, and finds the right machinery to make something really special and different from everything else at that price point (Like H Plus Sons.
I know this is a little off topic, but I have to ask, are H + Son rims really that great? Seems like their Archetype and also TB14 get a lot of love in this forum. But are they a revolutionary breakthrough, or at least remarkably better than other rims at their price point?

I plan to build some wheels this summer, and Iím considering my options for rims. Theyíll be for a steel frame road fixed gear machine, rim brake on front. Probably 32 rear spokes and 28 front. Iím only 160ish pounds and usually pretty careful with stuff, but I like wheels that last a long time and donít require much maintenance. I want the set to come in under 1700 grams or so. With the hubs I have, thatís doable if I get rims in the 450 gram neighborhood. I like classy and even boxy stuff (would really like to own a Volvo 240 someday) so those TB14s look really appealing, if just a bit porky. The Archetype doesnít blow my skirt upóI think itís the graphics that kind of turn me off.

Some options that interest me from other makers: Velocity A23 or Fusion, Mavic Open Pro or Open Sport, and maybe Stanís Alpha 340. How is an H + Son much better than any of these?
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Old 05-21-19, 10:08 PM
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Archetypes are hard to beat in terms of value. Great all around rims that undercut the price of just about everything else in their bracket. A23s are more expensive. Open Pros are more expensive still and outdated with the trend toward wider rims and tires. I don't have any experience with Stans, so can't give an opinion there.
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Old 05-22-19, 10:54 PM
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Iíve been riding Essor Aero Dash cranks for about 2 weeks they are sweet they donít spin up as-well as my omniums but they maintain well at a good cadence overall I love them they are stiff as heck.
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Old 05-23-19, 01:04 PM
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Velocity Dyads might be a better comparison to Archetypes. Both are non-tubeless, and while light, don't make weight-weenieness the top priority. So they're a little cheaper.

At A23 levels of money, I'd consider the Pacenti Forza. Wider, deeper, with a more modern aero profile, at not much of a weight penalty (~35g). And sharing tubeless compatibility and off-center options.
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Old 05-24-19, 04:48 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Velocity Dyads might be a better comparison to Archetypes.

At A23 levels of money, I'd consider the Pacenti Forza. Wider, deeper, with a more modern aero profile, at not much of a weight penalty (~35g).
Really, Dyads? I thought they were heavy duty, 600ish grams, for touring, tandems, etc.

I suppose wider and deeper is good, if they donít weigh a ton. I really want something pretty light and pretty tough, and narrow us okay.
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Old 05-24-19, 07:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Broctoon View Post
Really, Dyads? I thought they were heavy duty, 600ish grams, for touring, tandems, etc.

I suppose wider and deeper is good, if they don’t weigh a ton. I really want something pretty light and pretty tough, and narrow us okay.
I'm seeing closer to 500 grams on their page, but yeah, it wouldn't be my first choice either. Was mostly thinking of ways to compare like to like.

My wheels last long enough that I'm willing to spend a couple extra bucks for whatever seems the coolest. If you're up for classic box-section rims, the Pacenti Brevet 700C comes in at around 450 grams, too.
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