Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

Single speed kit durability?

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Single speed kit durability?

Old 03-11-20, 03:51 PM
  #1  
knopare
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Single speed kit durability?

Hi, I have an Surly Krampus with sram nx 11-speed drivetrain that are worn out. I also have a single speed kit with steel cog and aluminum spacers, that I was thinking to put on my bike. My plan this summer is to do a longer bikepacking trip and I wonder how durable it is to use a kit like this? Will it mess up the body on the hub? Is it better to build a real single speed rear wheel?

/David
knopare is offline  
Old 03-11-20, 04:23 PM
  #2  
Gresp15C
Senior Member
 
Gresp15C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,085
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 788 Post(s)
Liked 210 Times in 154 Posts
What's actually worn out? It would surprise me if the bike can't be restored to full glory by replacing the chain and cluster. I think that unless you're passionate about single speed riding as an end unto itself, taking a long trip "always in the wrong gear" will be a painful experience.
Gresp15C is offline  
Likes For Gresp15C:
Old 03-12-20, 12:25 AM
  #3  
knopare
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It is the whole drivetrain thats worn so its time to replace cassette etc. And thatís ok, got many miles out of it. But since I already have the kit I was wondering why not try that.
Maybe I will regret it while out on tour, I donít know but I want to try it. Just wonder if the kit idea is good and durable or just crap. Like, will it destroy the hub body or something.
knopare is offline  
Old 03-12-20, 10:56 AM
  #4  
Mikefule
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 28 Posts
Cycle equipment is old tech dressed up by the marketing people as more sophisticated than it really is. In my youth, I rode long distances (regular 100 mile days), carried camping gear, rode "road bikes" on and off road, and commuted, all with minimal maintenance, and the bikes just kept going.

OK, if you buy fancy lightweight stuff, it may wear more quickly, but the whole point of single speed is simplicity and that there's less to go wrong. You won't put your derailleur through the rear spokes; you won't have a broken gear cable; your indexing won't need adjusting; you won't be using one of those really narrow chains that may be marginally more likely to break.

Commuting 10 miles each way 5 days a week for a month is around 400 miles, but doesn't feel like much. 400 miles in a 4 day trip (for example) is exactly the same amount of riding as far as the bike is concerned. It just feels like more to the rider because it is done in a few big sessions.

Apart from that, are you going on a trip where there will be no bike shops?

Check everything is in good condition before you go. Pack a puncture repair kit, pump, tyre levers, multitool including a chain splitter, a few spare links of chain, a small can of oil, and maybe a spare long cable inner, and stop worrying. What's more important is to take things you need to keep the rider going: calories, water, money, phone.

Have fun. Cycling is surprisingly simple. Don't believe the industry and the internet that tells you it's complicated.
Mikefule is offline  
Likes For Mikefule:
Old 03-12-20, 11:34 AM
  #5  
TugaDude
Senior Member
 
TugaDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,313
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 227 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 82 Posts
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Cycle equipment is old tech dressed up by the marketing people as more sophisticated than it really is. In my youth, I rode long distances (regular 100 mile days), carried camping gear, rode "road bikes" on and off road, and commuted, all with minimal maintenance, and the bikes just kept going.

OK, if you buy fancy lightweight stuff, it may wear more quickly, but the whole point of single speed is simplicity and that there's less to go wrong. You won't put your derailleur through the rear spokes; you won't have a broken gear cable; your indexing won't need adjusting; you won't be using one of those really narrow chains that may be marginally more likely to break.

Commuting 10 miles each way 5 days a week for a month is around 400 miles, but doesn't feel like much. 400 miles in a 4 day trip (for example) is exactly the same amount of riding as far as the bike is concerned. It just feels like more to the rider because it is done in a few big sessions.

Apart from that, are you going on a trip where there will be no bike shops?

Check everything is in good condition before you go. Pack a puncture repair kit, pump, tyre levers, multitool including a chain splitter, a few spare links of chain, a small can of oil, and maybe a spare long cable inner, and stop worrying. What's more important is to take things you need to keep the rider going: calories, water, money, phone.

Have fun. Cycling is surprisingly simple. Don't believe the industry and the internet that tells you it's complicated.
When I was a kid I had an "off-brand" single speed cruiser, rode it all day every day and I don't remember ever lubing my chain. I had one blown-out tube because I filled the tire at a gas station and didn't have a gauge. Wow, was that loud. Left the bike outside, etc. and never had any issues with it. Not recommending doing that today, just saying.
TugaDude is online now  
Likes For TugaDude:
Old 03-12-20, 11:49 AM
  #6  
Mikefule
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 28 Posts
Originally Posted by TugaDude View Post
When I was a kid I had an "off-brand" single speed cruiser, rode it all day every day and I don't remember ever lubing my chain. I had one blown-out tube because I filled the tire at a gas station and didn't have a gauge. Wow, was that loud. Left the bike outside, etc. and never had any issues with it. Not recommending doing that today, just saying.
Yes, I did the "gas station" thing once. Didn't half make me jump. A cheap simple bike will survive a lot of abuse and poor maintenance. A well maintained bike should last for thousands of miles with very few parts needing replacement.
Mikefule is offline  
Old 03-12-20, 02:43 PM
  #7  
Lazyass
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 8,312

Bikes: Vintage steel, aluminum, modern carbon disc, single speed, MTB's, the works

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2003 Post(s)
Liked 72 Times in 44 Posts
I could be wrong, but I think the real single speed hubs threaded for a freewheel/cog are all 110-120mm. So if that's the case you would have no choice but to run what you have. The good part is you have a massive wheel selection. Bikepacking on a single speed would be cool. If you have to get off and walk some, who cares.
Lazyass is offline  
Old 03-12-20, 04:15 PM
  #8  
knopare
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ok, I think I will give it a go with the kit. It will be a new experience and probably much fun I guess. And I donít mind some walking with the bike every now and then.

Thanks for the answers!
/David
knopare is offline  
Old 03-12-20, 08:24 PM
  #9  
Gresp15C
Senior Member
 
Gresp15C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,085
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 788 Post(s)
Liked 210 Times in 154 Posts
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Commuting 10 miles each way 5 days a week for a month is around 400 miles, but doesn't feel like much. 400 miles in a 4 day trip (for example) is exactly the same amount of riding as far as the bike is concerned. It just feels like more to the rider because it is done in a few big sessions.
Indeed, I think about this when considering the reliability of my gear for something like a long weekend ride. My commuting bikes easily do 80 miles a week with minimal attention. And my commute is the same terrain, over and over, so I know that my gearing will be sufficient.

On the other hand, when I get roughly 10 to 20 miles out of town, in almost any direction, the terrain turns into endless rollers, and the wind picks up across the farm fields. That's when I'm glad to have a few gears. But naturally, this is as much a factor of my own physical condition as it one of terrain, so each rider has to decide for themselves.
Gresp15C is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.