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Freewheel Spacer (instead of redishing)

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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Freewheel Spacer (instead of redishing)

Old 05-04-20, 12:46 PM
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specialmonkey
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Freewheel Spacer (instead of redishing)

I have an '86 Trek Elance 310 frame I'm considering building into a single speed.
I bought a Suntour 8.8.8. 1/2 x 1/8 BMX single speed freewheel, and All City 612 Crankset, and have some 27" wheels in mind for the bike.
I'd prefer not to have to respace the axle and redish the wheel, but will do it if there is no other good option.
I'm not 100% sure I'll need to respace/redish, as I haven't put all the pieces together, but I expect I will need to (as that's the usual?), or perhaps I can use a spacer?

I watched an RJ the Bike Guy Video where he does respace/redish, and one where he shows why you cannot use spacers.


in the second video he links to this product (a spacer with additional threads) - he said he's not tried it. It seems to call out ebikes especially, but also mentions 1 speed ... I think it mentions a potential weakness in how the part is put together ... it may be two pieces ... does anyone have experience with this or feel strongly one way or the other that this is not a good option?

https://www.ebikekit.com/products/fr...er-for-1-speed


Freewheel Spacer

Freewheel Spacer



FREEWHEEL - SPACER FOR 1-SPEED
Product Code: FREEWHEEL-SPACER

Preserves chainline
Great for hub motors
Stainless Steel

This is a thread-on spacer that positions a single speed freewheel for proper chain alignment.

Single Speed Freewheel Spacer
This is a thread-on spacer that positions a single speed freewheel for proper chain alignment.
Threaded for ISO-standard 1.375" x 24 TPI freewheels (34.92 x 1.058 mm) 24mm (15/16 inch) length overall, so it will increase your chainline by about 12mm (just under 1/2 inch).
These use a tight thread-fit to prevent loosening, we install them by carefully mounting the spacer in a bench vise (it has wrench flats), then screwing the wheel onto it (be careful of cross-threading), and then installing the freewheel on the outside last.
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Old 05-04-20, 01:07 PM
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Unca_Sam
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I'd start with lots of measuring. A spacer sounds like a kludge, and I'd be concerned about being able to disassemble the spacer-hub-freewheel assembly after it's tight.
Screw on the freewheel and figure if you need to move the axle spacers. Do you know the chainline for your chosen crankset?

Edit: this method is FREE.
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Old 05-04-20, 01:25 PM
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Yes, if you just spin a single speed freewheel on your hub without a re-dish, chain line is guaranteed to be far off. As long as this spacer gets you close to where you need to be (a straight chain line), I'd not be concerned that it would fail in any manner. I looks really well built. I also don't see how it could get "stuck" as long as you install it with grease on all threads like you're supposed to do. It has flats for wrench or vise for removal. Kind of a cool idea actually, enabling you to go back to geared at any time.

Kludge? Kind of. But not a dangerous or weak one as far as I can tell. Once it's on there few would even notice.
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Old 05-04-20, 02:28 PM
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It depends on how far off your chain line is. A few mm is not dangerous.
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Old 05-24-20, 06:11 PM
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Just take apart the original multi speed freewheel and rearrange the cogs
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Old 05-24-20, 10:19 PM
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Yes, doable, but ... one of the really sweet aspects of single speed (and fixed gear) wheels is that they have virtually no dish. They feel so much more solid, Yes, a well built highly dished wheel works but it is like comparing an erector set with a welded triangle. A re-dish will make your wheel far better, A great place to dip your feet into wheel building should you so choose. A real step still better is a wide flanged hub designed for single speed or fix gear use. (I ride such hubs with the same, very light spokes I use in front, on both sides. Those wheels feel stiff.)

Ben
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Old 05-25-20, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
Yes, doable, but ... one of the really sweet aspects of single speed (and fixed gear) wheels is that they have virtually no dish. They feel so much more solid, Yes, a well built highly dished wheel works but it is like comparing an erector set with a welded triangle. A re-dish will make your wheel far better, A great place to dip your feet into wheel building should you so choose. A real step still better is a wide flanged hub designed for single speed or fix gear use. (I ride such hubs with the same, very light spokes I use in front, on both sides. Those wheels feel stiff.)

Ben


Thanks for the info!

I'd like to understand better what factor of single speed wheels make them more solid (compared to a re-spaced/re-dished wheel)? My understanding is they wouldn't need dishing to be centered in the frame. Is this due to the hub being built to expect a single speed sprocket, which would have a shorter threading on the drive side? Does this affect the overall hub measurements and therefore the spoke lengths? It seems a re-spaced/re-dished wheel is kind of a kludge and pushes/pulls the tolerances of the spokes (it seems this could affect proper tension)?

I'm more inclined to get a single speed wheel now.
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