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Novice's Feet keep hitting Truvativ crank Arms on my Pista -would spacers help?

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Novice's Feet keep hitting Truvativ crank Arms on my Pista -would spacers help?

Old 01-29-21, 05:14 PM
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5 mph
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Novice's Feet keep hitting Truvativ crank Arms on my Pista -would spacers help?

The inner edges of my feet keep on hitting my Truavtiv crank arms on my Bianchi Pista.
Its worse when I'm climbing hills and under strain when I really need to dig away.
So I have wide feed and MKS pedals with straps, so the straps keep me from
placing my feet outwards on the pedals.
Do others have this problem? I don't know if changing the cranks will help.
I was thinking of doing something to the pedals, to move them outwards, but I don't want to weaken that joint .
Is doing something to the pedals a workable idea or a not a good idea.
Thanks in advance.
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Old 01-29-21, 05:29 PM
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Bigbus
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They make pedal extensions that screw into your crank arms and then you install the pedals onto them. It would take thousands of pounds of force to break a 9/16" bolt unless you're using a gas wrench on it... They make these extensions just for riders like you (and others).
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Old 01-29-21, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by 5 mph View Post
The inner edges of my feet keep on hitting my Truavtiv crank arms on my Bianchi Pista.
Its worse when I'm climbing hills and under strain when I really need to dig away.
So I have wide feed and MKS pedals with straps, so the straps keep me from
placing my feet outwards on the pedals.
Do others have this problem? I don't know if changing the cranks will help.
I was thinking of doing something to the pedals, to move them outwards, but I don't want to weaken that joint .
Is doing something to the pedals a workable idea or a not a good idea.
Thanks in advance.
Try pedal extenders that will move your pedals outward a bit:



Search for "bicycle pedal extenders". Make sure you get the ones with threads that match your pedals and crank.
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Old 01-29-21, 06:30 PM
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79pmooney
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Another approach that is a big step toward commitment to being a "serious cyclist", using a pedal and cleat system. The cleat mounts on cycling shoes equipped with threaded inserts and lock into your pedals. Some (but not all) allow you to limit how far your foot can swing in. You can even use the cleats that have been made and used for over 100 years on your current pedals but those are trickier to use than the more modern "clipless" cleat/pedal systems.

A very brief overview of cleat systems - there are two major modern systems, Shimano SPD and the LOOK Delta, Keo and others. The SPD cleats are small solid steel units that lock into either side of a pedal that is little more than frame holding the locking mechanisms on the top and bottom. You place your foot on the pedal and push. They lock in with a fairly loud click. When locked in, you can swing your foot to either side, feeling some resistance to the turning. You can also adjust the angle the cleat is set in the shoe and alter where the neutral position is. To unlock, you twist your foot past the spring resistance to a bigger angle and the cleat pops out of the pedal. SPDs are very common, especially for the mountain bike crowd. All mountain bike shoes and many road cycling shoes come with the narrow two bolt pattern for them. Mountain bike shoes are easy to walk in; the sole is built up around the cleat.

The LOOK cleats are a much larger plastic piece that bolts with three screws to a large pattern on the shoe. The pedal is a larger platform that you push flat with your foot, sliding forward until you lock in. (The underside is not used.) Many racers prefer this type although both work. The shoes are lousy to walk on and the cleats wear out fast doing so. I have lumped these types as "LOOK". It's not quite so simple. LOOK is a French company that started the modern trend almost 40 years ago with the Delta model. They moved to the upgrade Keo (90s? 00s?) Shimano made a near copy with the SPD-SL. There are probably others. There is zero cross compatibility between any of these systems so your cleats have to match the pedals. However the Asian company whose name escapes me makes LOOK Delta compatible pedals and cleats still. (Some of the cheapest out there and quality both pedals and cleats.)

The traditional cleat is an aluminum block or plate with a deep groove running across it. Your pedal "rattrap" fits into this groove and the racers of yore then pulled their toestraps tight to lock their feet in. Those cleats used to be nailed into the old leather shoe soles but now you can use the three bolt road shoes and Exustar brand cleats. This is the easiest for you to mount now as it requires only the shoes and cleats but the trickiest to learn to use. Getting in and out is harder which leads to:

Riding locked in, pluses and drawbacks. Pluses: you can lock your foot so your heel clears on many but not all of the systems. Power transfer can be far better which is the primary reason all racers use the various systems. They can forestall various chronic physical issues. (My knees for example.)

Drawbacks: there is a learning curve. You will forget and come to a stop locked in and fall over. That's not maybe. Usually the worst damage is to the ego but not always. If you use one of the three bolt varieties you will be limited to shoes that make you walk as gracefully as ducks with china feet on ice. With the wrong cleats or cleat settings, you can do physical harm to yourself. (Feet, ankles and especially knees.) With all but the traditional cleats, your options for riding with regular shoes are gone for anything more than a few blocks. (Except there are SPD pedals that have the SPD mechanism on one side and a platform on the other.)

I am not trying to push this on you. Just give you a good overview. If cycling grabs you, this could be a solution. Pedal extenders as mentioned above could be the ticket. Now if you keep riding as is and have enough regular contact with the crank, especially if you ride in sand, mud and dirt, you will wear your cranks. I used to ride traditional cleats and in winter using thick shoes, the shoe at the ball of my foot would contact the crank. Two winters in the north east and I would wear the crank so much 20% of the material was gone! (Now I make stops to keep my foot from sliding in.)

Keep searching until you find what works for you! There is room for everybody in this world of cycling. Welcome! (And forgive me if you already knew all this.)

Edit: are you running fix gear or single speed? I ask because if you are running fix gear and will be going very fast, either sprinting at your limit or going downhill - you never want just one foot to come off the pedal! Ever! That pedal will come around and hit the back of your foot, Achilles or calf VERY hard. Think strong carpenter and heavy hammer. Almost certainly you will then crash.

For that reason I use the old-fashioned toeclips and slotted cleats on my fix gears. With the straps pulled tight, my feet are not coming out. I may un-clip but when that happens, my heart rate pegs, I dip on the brakes, slow a little, slide my foot forward and the pedal back into the cleat and nothing more happens.

Ben

Last edited by 79pmooney; 01-29-21 at 06:47 PM.
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Old 01-30-21, 01:16 AM
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Currently in cold wet conditions, I am staying with SS. When it gets warm, and my brake pads and tires stick better, I am going to try fixed.I'm excited.
Thanks for the information.I've thought about cleats and clipless pedals . For a while I was getting flats because I was using the original Track Tires.The problem is I tried carrying tools , CO 2 and a spare. It left a big footprint on my bike. Another 3 lbs on a 19 pound bike.
I stopped getting flats after I got some really good tires and Tuffgard strips.
But when I did get flats, I would usually just sling the bike evenly on my shoulders with a cloth strap and run or fast walk home .
But you have got me thinking.

Last edited by 5 mph; 01-30-21 at 01:25 AM.
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Old 01-30-21, 10:46 AM
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Your feet and lower legs are heavy. Shifting that moving weight further from the centre line of the bike will have some effect on handling, especially at high cadences.

You will also lose a small amount of cornering clearance.

However, pedal extenders are designed for the job, they are used successfully by many people, and they will certainly not break as a result of pedalling forces.

There is no "one size fits all" in bikes, and if you think you need these pedal extenders, try them. It's small investment and the change is easily reversible if you change your mind later.
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