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Stupid mistake! :(

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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Stupid mistake! :(

Old 04-11-21, 07:49 AM
  #1  
Mikefule
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Stupid mistake! :(

Oh dear.

For years, I have used a chain tool to take the chain off. Just pop the rivet most of the way through, clean and lube the chain and then pop the rivet back through, and ease it. Job done.

Very occasionally, I have undone the magic link using the needle-nosed pliers trick, but found it too much faff.

This last week, I finally got round to buying the proper pliers for undoing a magic link. "This'll save time and fuss," I thought.

Sure enough, the chain came off in half a second. I popped it straight into the pot of degreaser, slooshed it around and left it to stand while I was cleaning the jockey wheels and chain rings.

Then the next part of my process: removing the degreaser, which has always started by swinging the chain gently to let centrifugal force do its job.
It turns out that quite a small amount of centrifugal force can make half a magic link go a very long way.

Temporary fix, I've had to shorten the chain until I can get a pack of new magic links.
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Old 04-11-21, 08:46 PM
  #2  
ofajen
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Iíve actually had no trouble undoing SRAM and KMC links on 8 speed and SS chains by hand.

OTOH, Iíve had Odyssey Grandstand pedals on both bikes for about four years and kept tearing up the plastic end caps with needle nose pliers when pulling them to disassemble and grease the bushings. Had to keep ordering replacement caps.

Then I got the bright idea that I might one day pull apart a freewheel to re-lube it, so I got the Park freewheel pin spanner.

Lo and behold! I have yet to make the mistake of meddling with freewheel innards, but it is the perfect tool for removing the pedal end caps without damage! You know they could have put that tip on the pedal packaging. 😊

Plenty of stupid mistakes one can make!

Otto
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Old 04-12-21, 12:14 PM
  #3  
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All sorted. A pack of snap links in 10 speed size (for my gravel bike) and, while I was at it, a pack of 9 speed links for my wife's bike. Ordered yesterday, arrived today, fitted within minutes.

Lesson learned.

I tell you what, 10 speed chains are a sight more fiddly to work on than single speed chains.
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Old 04-12-21, 01:04 PM
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I wouldn't swing chains unless you are in a 50s style greaser gang. If I were to take a chain off I would hang it and wipe it down and then let it air dry the rest of the way or use an air gun or something to blow the rest out.
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Old 04-12-21, 01:42 PM
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in the Autumn of 2019 I was biking along a path when a bent chainring tooth fiendishly uncoupled my quick link, which I felt, then saw, flying past me into the dry leaves.

I generally ride with a chain tool ,but that day I was riding with my buddy who is *always* very prepared. This was the one day he decided he didn't need his tool kit.

There is no *SAD WALK HOME* emoji, but this is where such a thing is needed
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Old 04-12-21, 07:34 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
in the Autumn of 2019 I was biking along a path when a bent chainring tooth fiendishly uncoupled my quick link, which I felt, then saw, flying past me into the dry leaves.

I generally ride with a chain tool ,but that day I was riding with my buddy who is *always* very prepared. This was the one day he decided he didn't need his tool kit.

There is no *SAD WALK HOME* emoji, but this is where such a thing is needed
I don't really carry a chain tool most of the time unless I am touring or maybe on the mountain bike but beyond that I don't really want to carry a ton of tools. My road seabag which I use for my ti road bike and my fixed gear and single speed is small and doesn't have a ton of room so a chain tool doesn't need to take up that precious space.
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Old 04-12-21, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
I wouldn't swing chains unless you are in a 50s style greaser gang. If I were to take a chain off I would hang it and wipe it down and then let it air dry the rest of the way or use an air gun or something to blow the rest out.
It's a system that worked for me to get the worst of the liquid off quickly. The only difference was that this time I had opened the split link and forgot it was not secure.

I'm not old enough to remember the 50s, but I was a regular at 1950s rock and roll clubs in the late 1970s, and I knew at least one person who wore a length of motorcycle chain as a belt, with a clip he could undo quickly in case of trouble.
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Old 04-13-21, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
I don't really carry a chain tool most of the time unless I am touring or maybe on the mountain bike but beyond that I don't really want to carry a ton of tools. My road seabag which I use for my ti road bike and my fixed gear and single speed is small and doesn't have a ton of room so a chain tool doesn't need to take up that precious space.
I have a small multi tool with allen keys, a couple wrenches, and a chain tool. The body of this tool, to which all these different bits are attached, splits apart and can be used as two tire levers. I can fit this tool, a spare tube, and a patch kit into a small seat bag.

There are dozens of different styles of multi-tools and many have a chain tool built in - a chain tool is the one thing that a well-stocked non-bike workshop is unlikely to have, and is very difficult to substitute for any other item. Here's one:
https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5034-5...l?colour=NOC02

A broken chain is uncommon, but unless you have a chain tool you are probably walking home if it happens. I did once manage to partially put a chain back together with two rocks, and made it just strong enough to get me to a house where someone was working in the garage and could lend me some pliers to bring the chain strength from 5% up to maybe ~50% of a good one.
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Old 04-13-21, 11:58 AM
  #9  
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I have a chain tool and 10/11 spd. quick links in my saddle bags 100% of the time, and haven't needed them for myself in the last 8 years, though I have seen other riders in my groups with broken/bent chains about 3-4 times in that same time frame, and none had chain tools.

Better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it.
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Old 04-13-21, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
I have a small multi tool with allen keys, a couple wrenches, and a chain tool. The body of this tool, to which all these different bits are attached, splits apart and can be used as two tire levers. I can fit this tool, a spare tube, and a patch kit into a small seat bag.

There are dozens of different styles of multi-tools and many have a chain tool built in - a chain tool is the one thing that a well-stocked non-bike workshop is unlikely to have, and is very difficult to substitute for any other item. Here's one:
https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5034-5...l?colour=NOC02

A broken chain is uncommon, but unless you have a chain tool you are probably walking home if it happens. I did once manage to partially put a chain back together with two rocks, and made it just strong enough to get me to a house where someone was working in the garage and could lend me some pliers to bring the chain strength from 5% up to maybe ~50% of a good one.
I have a tool with a chain tool on it but it is not as compact as I would need it to fit in that tiny pack and I really like the pack it works with my Topeak system and I don't want to change that and their medium packs are just a little too big. If it gets really bad to the point my chain is broken I am probably having a crappy enough time I will just want to call a friend and buy them lunch or dinner or take a bus back or something like that. I haven't had any major stuff like that so I don't worry about it too much.
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