Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

Anyone running tubulars?

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Anyone running tubulars?

Old 04-14-21, 04:32 AM
  #1  
Lazyass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 8,595

Bikes: Vintage steel, aluminum, modern carbon disc, single speed, MTB's, the works

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2118 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 138 Posts
Anyone running tubulars?

I've always preferred tubular tires and currently have them on three of my road bikes. Thinking about ordering a custom set from PWB for the Wabi. Paul hubs, DT Comp spokes and Kinlin TB 20 tubulars for less than $700. I think black hubs/rims and silver spokes would look nice.

My rain bike is my Swobo Accomplice and it still has the cheap stock wheelset. The Sub-15's I have on my Wabi would be perfect for it.

I'm also probably going to order a set for my Diamondback Podium disc road bike. I've been bummed because I had never been able to find some narrow aluminum tubular disc rims (I like 23mm tires), they're all wide for CX bikes. But I was on their website and Kinlin has the TB 20 disc version with a 18.5mm width and they have WI hubs on sale. I can have those built for less than $700 as well.

Anyone else running tubulars? And I'm curious what the turnaround time is with PWB if anyone knows.
Lazyass is offline  
Old 04-14-21, 08:11 AM
  #2  
drlogik 
Senior Member
 
drlogik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,305

Bikes: '87-ish Pinarello Montello; '89 Nishiki Ariel; '85 Raleigh Wyoming, '16 Wabi Special, '16 Wabi Classic, '14 Kona Cinder Cone

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 484 Post(s)
Liked 134 Times in 91 Posts
I used to run tubulars back in the day but not now. Where I lived we called them "Sew-ups". I loved the ride but the fiddly nature of Sew-ups was a royal pain...especially fixing flats.

I now run Challenge "open tubular" tires with latex tubes. The ride qualities almost mirror those of sew-ups but with the utility of clinchers. I love these Challenge brand tires. The Strada Bianca's (the higher 260 TPI model) are what I run.

I think Veloflex offers the same type of tires but I have not used those.


--

Last edited by drlogik; 04-14-21 at 08:23 AM.
drlogik is offline  
Old 04-14-21, 09:19 AM
  #3  
Lazyass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 8,595

Bikes: Vintage steel, aluminum, modern carbon disc, single speed, MTB's, the works

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2118 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 138 Posts
Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
I used to run tubulars back in the day but not now. Where I lived we called them "Sew-ups". I loved the ride but the fiddly nature of Sew-ups was a royal pain...especially fixing flats.

I now run Challenge "open tubular" tires with latex tubes. The ride qualities almost mirror those of sew-ups but with the utility of clinchers. I love these Challenge brand tires. The Strada Bianca's (the higher 260 TPI model) are what I run.

I think Veloflex offers the same type of tires but I have not used those.


--
Flats are easy. I carry a small 2oz bottle of Stan's sealant. Pop the valve stem off with my chain breaker, squeeze in half the bottle, pump it up and go. And I can swap on a spare tire in the same time or less as I can swap a tube.
Lazyass is offline  
Likes For Lazyass:
Old 04-14-21, 09:35 AM
  #4  
Rolla
Gyro Captain
 
Rolla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 705

Bikes: Sycip, Black Mountain Cycles, Kona, Fairdale, WeThePeople

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Liked 743 Times in 319 Posts
If I was riding the track I'd use nothing but tubulars (preferably Veloflex Records), but for the real world of the road and trail, clinchers seem more practical and economical. Nothing compares to the ride quality of tubulars, though...
Rolla is online now  
Old 04-14-21, 09:42 AM
  #5  
Lazyass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 8,595

Bikes: Vintage steel, aluminum, modern carbon disc, single speed, MTB's, the works

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2118 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 138 Posts
Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
If I was riding the track I'd use nothing but tubulars (preferably Veloflex Records), but for the real world of the road and trail, clinchers seem more practical and economical. Nothing compares to the ride quality of tubulars, though...
I like how supple they are and how they handle since there's no sidewall, and I enjoy the process of gluing and mounting them. And it's nice knowing that in a major emergency I can limp home on a flat. But I've never had to do that in over 30 years of running them. My first road bike had tubulars and that's all I ran for the first four years of cycling so it's not a big deal to me.
Lazyass is offline  
Old 04-14-21, 11:13 AM
  #6  
Rolla
Gyro Captain
 
Rolla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 705

Bikes: Sycip, Black Mountain Cycles, Kona, Fairdale, WeThePeople

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Liked 743 Times in 319 Posts
Originally Posted by Lazyass View Post
My first road bike had tubulars and that's all I ran for the first four years of cycling so it's not a big deal to me.
Same here -- tubulars were all I ever knew back in the 70s. But over the years clinchers have become so ubiquitous that I couldn't see intentionally going back. I still fondly recall using a leather toe strap to cinch a spare tubular under my saddle -- although I wouldn't go back to toe clips, either!
Rolla is online now  
Old 04-14-21, 11:43 AM
  #7  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,513

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 102 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2877 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1,386 Times in 941 Posts
I haven't ridden tubulars since the late 90s but I am going to go back to them. Peace of mind. I've had a clincher blowout and the tire coming off the rim. Never want want to see that crash again. Ever. And that happened going less than 25 mph. There are a bunch of 50 mph hills here around Portland. On Cycle Oregon, hills that fast that go on for miles.

By contrast, I've blown tubulars at 40+ and it was such a non-deal I don't even remember if it was a front or rear tire. Just rolled to a stop (using gentle braking on the blown wheel). Change and ride on. I also like the idea that I can hit anything with that rim and as long as it fits through the bike frame, I can still ride it. (Often the tire doesn't even flat. I've hit bottomless potholes and bumped home with inch deep dents.)

I used to like the other safety aspect of tubulars when I commuted through neighborhoods where I didn't feel entirely safe. If I flatted, I knew I could have the tire changed and be going again in 10 minutes. Even if I was having a really bad day. If need be, I could simply not stop. That would probably kill that rim, but in exchange for my hide? I'd take it.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 04-14-21, 12:40 PM
  #8  
geeteeiii
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Estonia
Posts: 77

Bikes: HVZ Meteor 1979, HVZ Champion 1962, HVZ SS Moskva80 1981, DŁrkopp 1936

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked 115 Times in 31 Posts
My soviet track bike came with a tubular wheelset, i figured id run them till the first flat, then get the rims replaced, but they have grown on me. They had Tufo tubulars on them when i got the bike and i still run those same tires, they seem pretty durable. They(tufos) dont roll that well unless at high pressure, but the rest of the wheelset makes up for it in terms of lightness and for me cool factor. Plus those vintage Campy/Gipiemme hubs run so smooth.
geeteeiii is offline  
Old 04-14-21, 06:18 PM
  #9  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,409

Bikes: 29 frames + 74 wheels

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 890 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 114 Posts
Tubulars are all I’ve ever used for racing road, track, and xcross. However, for touring or just general recreational riding it’s 100% clinchers for me now. I do have an old vintage road bike with tubulars and toeclips and straps that I ride with old leather cleated cycling shoes whenever I get in a nostalgic mood, but I don’t miss the hassle of glueing on tubulars or repairing them.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 04-14-21, 06:40 PM
  #10  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 22,542

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 133 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2574 Post(s)
Liked 1,204 Times in 763 Posts
I have two sets of wheels for my fixed gear bike: clincher and tubular. For a long time, I saved the tubulars for special occasions, but last summer I rode them for pretty much the entire season. No flats until late October. Switched back to the clinchers for the rest of autumn; still using them this spring. Once the winter debris gets cleared off the roads, I'll go back to the tubulars.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Likes For JohnDThompson:
Old 04-15-21, 03:37 AM
  #11  
Lazyass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 8,595

Bikes: Vintage steel, aluminum, modern carbon disc, single speed, MTB's, the works

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2118 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 138 Posts
Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
Same here -- tubulars were all I ever knew back in the 70s. But over the years clinchers have become so ubiquitous that I couldn't see intentionally going back. I still fondly recall using a leather toe strap to cinch a spare tubular under my saddle -- although I wouldn't go back to toe clips, either!
Yeah I still have the leather straps. My first road bike I got in '87 was an '84 Peugeot PX10 with the stock tubulars. My uncle was into cycling and he gave me that bike and taught me how to glue and repair tubs. I remember back then the "serious" guys looked down on clinchers. It had clips and straps but I actually bought some Look pedals the week I got the bike.



Last edited by Lazyass; 04-15-21 at 03:52 AM.
Lazyass is offline  
Likes For Lazyass:
Old 04-15-21, 07:03 AM
  #12  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,409

Bikes: 29 frames + 74 wheels

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 890 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 114 Posts
^^^ That Univega is truly gorgeous, and you’ve kept it in immaculate condition. Bravo !
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 04-15-21, 07:53 AM
  #13  
TMonk
Not actually Tmonk
 
TMonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 11,910

Bikes: road, track, mtb

Mentioned: 136 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1224 Post(s)
Liked 907 Times in 485 Posts
Tubular on my track FG
Clincher on my road FG
Tubeless MTB
Clincher on my road bikes

They say now that with current technology, latex tubes and clinchers are actually faster than modern tubulars. That's what I ride on my TT bike and (racing) road wheels. If I was in the market for a new track wheelset, I would consider clincher for this reason.

But latex tubes are a hassle so I run butyl on my road FG and road bikes. Tubeless all the way on MTB, it offers a much larger advantage since thorns/spikes/light punctures are more common and I actually want to run significantly lower pressure vs road.

I agree there is something "old school" and kinda cool about tubulars. I don't mind gluing them since my track bike is low mileage and I don't even have to do it every season. Does it have better ride quality? Sure, IDK. I tend to be be pretty insensitive to all but the most major of equipment changes. In TT or MTB maybe but otherwise I don't really notice that stuff.
__________________
"Your beauty is an aeroplane;
so high, my heart cannot bear the strain." -A.C. Jobim, Triste
TMonk is offline  
Likes For TMonk:
Old 04-15-21, 10:43 PM
  #14  
ofajen
Cheerfully low end
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 761
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 220 Post(s)
Liked 309 Times in 207 Posts
I havenít been in recent years. I still have the tubular wheel set I built decades ago. I donít really ride roads any more to the extent I can avoid it. However, I could run cyclocross tubulars on the road frame bike and that should work great on my trail rides. Might have to put drop bars back on if Iím gonna run tubulars. 😊

Otto
ofajen is online now  
Old 04-16-21, 12:55 PM
  #15  
Senrab62 
It's the little things
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 526

Bikes: Too many, yet not enough

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 170 Post(s)
Liked 163 Times in 74 Posts
I have exactly one bike with tubs, and it will remain the only bike with tubs. Don't have experience with them, but the fact that for a majority of the riding I do, they don't have any inherent advantages, and have to be glued, I think clinchers are best for me.

I have been told, that the riding experience is night and day, is it that much better?
Senrab62 is offline  
Old 04-16-21, 01:15 PM
  #16  
Chubby715
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Fairfield, CT
Posts: 63

Bikes: Cervelo R5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 16 Posts
I've only run tubulars on my road bikes. Started riding in the early 80s with Ambrosio Synthesis Durex rims and Vittoria Super Corsas. Very easy to repair on the road as I carried a folded up spare under my saddle with an old toe strap. In the early aughts I started riding again and switched to Conti Sprinters. Very durable tire and affordable. And I'm currently running Conti tubes on Zipp 303s.
Chubby715 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.