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Straight blade forks ...

Old 12-14-05, 07:41 PM
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eyefloater
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Straight blade forks ...

This is something I've been curious about so I thought I'd ask.

Who first developed them (I'm guessing Colnago) and what was the reason for the new design - increased stiffness? Are there any detriments to a straight blade design, compared to a traditional curved fork?

- eyefloater
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Old 12-14-05, 09:18 PM
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Originally Posted by eyefloater
This is something I've been curious about so I thought I'd ask.

Who first developed them (I'm guessing Colnago) and what was the reason for the new design - increased stiffness? Are there any detriments to a straight blade design, compared to a traditional curved fork?

- eyefloater
Although I can't give you an example offhand, I'd be willing to bet that Colnago didn't invent them. Something that basic had to be done many years ago, although not in a production setting with cast or forged fork crowns (because I suppose we'd be familiar with earlier examples if they were production bikes).

The reason for recent popularity? Aesthetics or expedience (eliminating a step in construction). I really can't believe that there'd be a perceptible difference in stiffness. Detriments? I don't know . . . maybe a limited range in fork offset w/o bending the crown?

I was intrigued by them when I first noticed them on road bikes (Marcel Wust road a straight blade lugged Zullo early in his career, on a Spanish team I think). But the novelty wore off. Generally I think curved forks are better looking. Here's hoping that DW or RS will weigh in with a more authoritative response!
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Old 12-14-05, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by eyefloater
This is something I've been curious about so I thought I'd ask.

Who first developed them (I'm guessing Colnago) and what was the reason for the new design - increased stiffness? Are there any detriments to a straight blade design, compared to a traditional curved fork?

- eyefloater

I asked a question similar to this before and this is the answer I got

there is no difference if the offsets are equal.
straight bladed forks are a manufacturing option
which affords the maker efficiency and productivity.
it's easier to cant two straight blades into, say, a
45mm rake, than it is two rake two singular
blades into matching and parallel sets for a
curved build.
e-RICHIE©™®



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Old 12-14-05, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Rodador
Although I can't give you an example offhand, I'd be willing to bet that Colnago didn't invent them.
Actually he did. At least that's what it says on the colnago website. It also says he invented the cold forging of fork blades in 1957 and the microfusion casting of fork crowns and lugs in 1969.
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Old 12-14-05, 10:26 PM
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Ok, sorry for being a newbie or whatever. But I've been a lot of bikes with straight forks and it seems like your foot would hit the wheel if you're turning sharply. Or is that only at low speeds? Also, how would you trackstand?
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Old 12-14-05, 10:31 PM
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it's actually exactly the same as a curved fork with the same rake. The difference in a straight blade is that the rake is built into the crown, where on a curved blade fork the rake is in the blades. Like e-richie said, a straight blade fork just makes it easier to produce an accurately raked fork.
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