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Izumi V: how long do they last?

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Izumi V: how long do they last?

Old 03-31-06, 02:23 AM
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Izumi V: how long do they last?

I'm interested in knowing how long Izumi V chains tend to last. The reason being is that I have one right now, and I'd like to get a sense of how long it will be before I should swap it out. They're reputedly stretch proof, but I'd rather not find out that's not entirely true and end up with a matching cog and chainring.

FWIW, I ride at least 50 miles a week now, and probably upwards of 90 next week when I start a new job. I clean and lube the V regularly.
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Old 04-05-06, 02:10 PM
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any takers? maybe these things do last forever....
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Old 04-05-06, 02:17 PM
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that's one of the more high-end chains on the market, so it'll probably last quite a few miles, depending on operating conditions, chain tension, lube, how often you skid, etc. i wouldn't worry about it.

all chains wear at the bushings though (creating percevied "stretch"). the V might last longer than your garden variety $10 KMC chain, but my money says it doesn't last that much longer.
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Old 04-05-06, 02:23 PM
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will last til kingdom come.
 
Old 04-05-06, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by brunning
that's one of the more high-end chains on the market, so it'll probably last quite a few miles, depending on operating conditions, chain tension, lube, how often you skid, etc. i wouldn't worry about it.

all chains wear at the bushings though (creating percevied "stretch"). the V might last longer than your garden variety $10 KMC chain, but my money says it doesn't last that much longer.
my guess is that it does. the extra cost comes from the alloys used, which are harder, denser and more corrosion resistant than the steel in your average bargain chain.
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Old 04-05-06, 10:32 PM
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I use Izumi V's on the track and have never, ever had any wear. I measure a meter of the chain and look for an increase in length. With about 800 miles of actual track racing use plus another 1300 miles or so of fixie use on one chain that I've been keeping track of, that meter of chain hasn't changed in length by a millimeter. Bloody amazing chains.

Proper 1/8" chains are constructed differently from 3/32" ones. The design of the narrower chains makes them much more prone to wear. When you get a high-precision, high-quality-steel 1/8" chain, you can expect it to last a very long time. If you want a different measure, there were some guys who rode 1/8" drive single speeds the length of central America and then for good measure, rode all the way down the west coast of South America to Santiago Chile. Their final distance was over 2500 miles, almost all on dirt roads, erratic lubrication, rainstorms, duststorms, etc., and at the end their Izumi's showed no measurable wear.
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Old 04-05-06, 10:41 PM
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FYI: A chain that stretches a mm or more requires an immediate change...
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Old 04-05-06, 11:07 PM
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Actually, the generally accepted standard is 1/8" in a foot of chain. You can count the links and measure the length with a ruler.
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Old 04-06-06, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by 11.4
Actually, the generally accepted standard is 1/8" in a foot of chain. You can count the links and measure the length with a ruler.

Seems really counter-intuitive to measure the chain with a freaking RULER (a tape measure would seem infinitely more logical) when Park makes a tool specifically for this purpose. I've already covered this in another thread, though.
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Old 04-06-06, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by 12XU
Seems really counter-intuitive to measure the chain with a freaking RULER (a tape measure would seem infinitely more logical) when Park makes a tool specifically for this purpose. I've already covered this in another thread, though.
It seems slightly pointless to buy yet another tool with only one use when a ruler will do the job just as well and can be used for lots of other purposes. Guess we should all be good little consumers though...
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Old 04-06-06, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by 12XU
Seems really counter-intuitive to measure the chain with a freaking RULER (a tape measure would seem infinitely more logical) when Park makes a tool specifically for this purpose. I've already covered this in another thread, though.
I believe 11.4 is referring to a "foot of chain" and not the actual chain. A foot of chain is easily measured with a ruler.
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Old 04-06-06, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by 12XU
Seems really counter-intuitive to measure the chain with a freaking RULER (a tape measure would seem infinitely more logical) when Park makes a tool specifically for this purpose. I've already covered this in another thread, though.
Many consider those gauges to be not as consistently accurate as the tape measurement method.
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Old 04-06-06, 09:17 AM
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Thanks for the edits, everyone. Yes, measure 12 full links (each of which measures 1 inch overall) and if they go over 12-1/8", you should replace the chain. I don't like using the little Park or Rohloff tools for two reasons: First, they measure a much shorter distance so accuracy is harder to achieve. Second, if one link has some grit that prevents it from settling out and makes the chain look OK, you won't detect the worn chain. If you measure a whole foot of chain, you're more likely to pick up signs of wearing.
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Old 04-06-06, 10:33 AM
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and 11.4 wins the race...
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Old 04-06-06, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Momentum
and 11.4 wins the race...
Big freaking surprise. The dude drops knowledge like he's trying to get rid of it.
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