Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

List of Crucial Skills to learn Rinding in the streets?

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

List of Crucial Skills to learn Rinding in the streets?

Old 12-25-06, 01:05 PM
  #76  
August Spies
Crazy-assed messanger
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Hamilton, Ont, Canada
Posts: 85

Bikes: 20-year old (upgraded) Supercycle Medalist, Specialized Hardrock, never ending assortment of mid-repair old 10-speeds

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Stopping. Skid, slow, whatever...or even maybe using one of those "brake" things everyone's ranting about.

Beyond that it's all show. Handy, but show.
August Spies is offline  
Old 12-25-06, 01:09 PM
  #77  
onetwentyeight 
blah
 
onetwentyeight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 5,573
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
tricks teach you balance and handling. anything you can do on a bike might help you out sometime when you least expect it.
onetwentyeight is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 12:04 PM
  #78  
Gyeswho
Utilitarian Boy
Thread Starter
 
Gyeswho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bronx, NY
Posts: 3,235

Bikes: Check the sig to find out

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
now that I've finally got it down, also knowing how to track stand in all 4 wheel positions. Very useful when you're in traffic and you don't have the space to position yourself the way you most feel comfy. It's awkward at 1st when you turn your wheel opposite the direction of your forward facing foot but it's definitely nice once you get it down
Gyeswho is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 12:26 PM
  #79  
nathbdp
Senior Member
 
nathbdp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 624
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Situational Awareness.

"
Although the term itself is fairly recent, the concept appears to go back a long way in the history of military theory—it is recognizable in Sun Tzu's Art of War, for instance. The term itself, can be traced back to World War I, where it was recognized as a crucial component for crews in military aircraft (Press, 1986).
Before being widely adopted by human factors scientists in the 1990s, the term was first used by United States Air Force (USAF) fighter aircrew returning from war in Korea and Vietnam (see Watts, 2004). They identified having good SA as the decisive factor in air-to-air combat engagements—the "ace factor" (Spick, 1988). Survival in a dogfight was typically a matter of observing the opponent's current move and anticipating his next move a fraction of a second before he could observe and anticipate one's own."
nathbdp is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 01:47 PM
  #80  
sammie.
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Not sure if this was mentioned or maybe just too obvious, but learn to avoid getting caught in the street car tracks, or take an alternate route all together.
sammie. is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 02:03 PM
  #81  
Build your own
%#&*#%>?%
 
Build your own's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mass
Posts: 845

Bikes: Pake,Shogun,Nishiki,Motobecane

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd say freehanded skidz are the most important so as to be able to break when drinking coffee while riding brakeless.
Build your own is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 02:19 PM
  #82  
obstacle
-
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Manhattan, NYC
Posts: 400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by marqueemoon View Post
Sorry to get all practical on everyone but...

holding a line
riding in a group
recognizing slick/unsafe conditions (oil, metal plates, wet leaves, manhole covers, sewer grates, painted crosswalks, etc...)
predicting driver and ped behavior
quick acceleration (including getting into the pedals quickly)
not getting right hooked at intersections
staying the **** out of the door zone
This list is way more useful than the hipster OP. I'd add;
- always having at least two "outs", watching the street and always having at least two places off line if something goes the way you don't think it does. I suppose you could just call it looking two steps ahead.
obstacle is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 02:45 PM
  #83  
Gyeswho
Utilitarian Boy
Thread Starter
 
Gyeswho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bronx, NY
Posts: 3,235

Bikes: Check the sig to find out

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by obstacle View Post
This list is way more useful than the hipster OP. I'd add;
- always having at least two "outs", watching the street and always having at least two places off line if something goes the way you don't think it does. I suppose you could just call it looking two steps ahead.
that's why it's contributory thread for others to add to. Since you feel the need to call me a hipster based solely on a thread posting, maybe we can ride together since we both live in NYC so we could eliminate the childish name calling and just be two people who enjoy riding bikes. What do you say?
Gyeswho is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 03:12 PM
  #84  
Live2Die
?que?
 
Live2Die's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Portland Oregon
Posts: 783
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd say that being able to skid with both feet is a must. When I'm bombing a hit toward and intersection I like to do short little half second skids and then rotate 180 and do another it saves your tires a ton as well as allows you to stay in your saddle and in better control. Not to mention that if you can skid with both feet you can throw on the emergency fishtail between a car on the spot. Which by the way is one more skill thats been eluded to but I think being able to make a 90 turn between a hood and trunk with no skid to avoid the moron cutting you off is a must, it just takes confidence on your bike and knowing what your clip point on your pedals is. Not that it's necessary but certainly helpful to comfortable riding on the yellow line so you can make your left turn without slowing down.
Live2Die is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 04:02 PM
  #85  
craigmoyer
Senior Member
 
craigmoyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 196

Bikes: FrankenBike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by metallo pesante View Post
being able to buck up a wheelie out of a trackstand as to challenge the cars around you and intensify yourself as a cyclist on the road and just a general badass to the surrounding people on the sidewalk.
Plus one.
craigmoyer is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 05:27 PM
  #86  
rduenas
Senior Member
 
rduenas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: New York City
Posts: 718
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by sammie. View Post
Not sure if this was mentioned or maybe just too obvious, but learn to avoid getting caught in the street car tracks, or take an alternate route all together.
This has pretty much become a rite of passage in sf. Everyone I know has learned the hard way how to get over the rails.

It's like when a baby sticks its finger in an electrical socket. Never again.
rduenas is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 05:34 PM
  #87  
fetch
harrospokes!
 
fetch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,263
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
posting in a shiznaz thread!!!!
fetch is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 06:01 PM
  #88  
hudsong
North American Scum
 
hudsong's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 273

Bikes: Swobo Sanchez

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by loaf View Post
Peripheral vision is key. Gotta know what's going on all around you at all times.

I'm also working on the no handed whistle to replace yelling. I can't do the whistle with two fingers yet, so it'll be a bit till I learn the no hander.
Yeah, I learned to whistle really loudly with no hands years ago. It's super useful, but I think you can either do it or you can't (genetic).
hudsong is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 07:02 PM
  #89  
Ken Cox
King of the Hipsters
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Bend, Oregon
Posts: 2,128

Bikes: Realm Cycles Custom

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, this might sound stupid or too elementary to consider, but I consider the ability to look behind oneself, left and right, without turning in the direction one has looked, a very important skill.

So, I say to new riders, in non-critical situations, practice holding a line while you look completely behind yourself over either shoulder, left and right.
Ken Cox is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 07:21 PM
  #90  
nayr497
Senior Member
 
nayr497's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Nilbog
Posts: 1,674

Bikes: How'd I get this many?

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Right on, Ken. In any riding environment, I think holding a line is crucial.

I like when an old thread gets dug up and all the posters from a few years back come back via visually memory of their screen name and pictures, signatures, bikes, etc.

Marquemoon listed some great ones. Yep, definitely avoid doors, watch out for those huge steel plates the cover pipe work in cities (slippery in rain, death to a rim at speeds).

I'd also say that watching and getting used to car "body language" is key. I rode in a big city for a few years, now live in not such a big city. But, today my big city skills came in handy and helped me avoid a bad situation.

Watching the driver, the wheels, crosswalk flashers, traffic lights...all sorts of things and being able to kind of "process" them all at once is very helpful. The more you ride, the better you'll get at it. And for people riding in heavy traffic who are new to riding, a good way to improve these skills faster is to always plan on the worst and go through what you would do *if* that bus turns in front of you. Hopefully it doesn't, but if you are constantly mentally rehearsing, you might be more well prepared when it does hit the fan some day.
nayr497 is offline  
Old 05-20-08, 10:46 PM
  #91  
dervish
unofficial
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: san rafael, CA
Posts: 1,054
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
above all, just have great balance and common sense and you should be able to take care of the rest
dervish is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 06:14 AM
  #92  
captsven
Spawn of Satan
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA
Posts: 765
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For conversion riders mostly...

Knowing how far you can lean on fast/tight turns without pedal strike. I just got some new pedals and almost ****ed myself up on a turn! I have been on the same pedals for years and got so comfortable on them, I completely forgot about strike.
captsven is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 06:41 AM
  #93  
sammie.
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by rduenas View Post
It's like when a baby sticks its finger in an electrical socket. Never again.
Hahah, exactly.
When it happen to me I ended up right in front of a car, I felt like such a jackass.
sammie. is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 06:50 AM
  #94  
queerpunk
aka mattio
 
queerpunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,503
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 304 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by onetwentyeight View Post
tricks teach you balance and handling. anything you can do on a bike might help you out sometime when you least expect it.
and sometimes when you least realize it - when you're utilizing skills without realizing it, in a pinch, when you have to react fast.
queerpunk is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 07:16 AM
  #95  
jdms mvp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: four 1 OHHH , Maryland
Posts: 2,849

Bikes: nagasawa, fuji track pro

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by taken67 View Post
Do these vary from state to state because I remember right turn being a 90 degree angle pointing upward with the left hand.
while driving....
jdms mvp is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 09:12 AM
  #96  
evan_phi
iPwn.
 
evan_phi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Sackville (School)/Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 148

Bikes: 2004 Norco Wolverine (Blue) set up with Semi-Slicks. Mid-1970's Raleigh, converted to single seed, (soon to be) all white.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think one of the most important things is looking well ahead.

this is one of the most important things I learned during Driver Training, and it helps me tonnes with cycling as well.
evan_phi is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 09:32 AM
  #97  
seagull_bags
Lets do this
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Columbus, Oh
Posts: 176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by evan_phi View Post
I think one of the most important things is looking well ahead.
+1
Look ahead, and learn how anticipate what people will do. Also, learning how to control speed without needed to skid that much is nice. Your tires last way longer, and its a more fluid ride.
seagull_bags is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 09:52 AM
  #98  
jdms mvp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: four 1 OHHH , Maryland
Posts: 2,849

Bikes: nagasawa, fuji track pro

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
barspins...
jdms mvp is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 09:53 AM
  #99  
TheBrick
Tinkerer since 1980
 
TheBrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: London
Posts: 922

Bikes: Coppi racer, Old school BMX, some random a fixed wheel convertion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by nathbdp View Post
Situational Awareness.

"
Although the term itself is fairly recent, the concept appears to go back a long way in the history of military theory—it is recognizable in Sun Tzu's Art of War, for instance. The term itself, can be traced back to World War I, where it was recognized as a crucial component for crews in military aircraft (Press, 1986).
Before being widely adopted by human factors scientists in the 1990s, the term was first used by United States Air Force (USAF) fighter aircrew returning from war in Korea and Vietnam (see Watts, 2004). They identified having good SA as the decisive factor in air-to-air combat engagements—the "ace factor" (Spick, 1988). Survival in a dogfight was typically a matter of observing the opponent's current move and anticipating his next move a fraction of a second before he could observe and anticipate one's own."

Only read the first page of this thread and was amazed something like this was not mentioned before.

For me I would describe it as observation and awareness of your limits. Observation and awareness of where you and your path fit into the system is easily the most important skill when on the road whether driving or riding.
TheBrick is offline  
Old 05-21-08, 10:13 AM
  #100  
noisebeam
Al
 
noisebeam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: AZ
Posts: 14,617

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix, Lemond Poprad. Retired: Jamis Sputnik, Centurion LeMans Fixed, Diamond Back ascent ex

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3467 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 47 Posts
http://www.bikexprt.com/streetsmarts/usa/index.htm
noisebeam is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.