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Do It Yourself (DIY)

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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Do It Yourself (DIY)

Old 01-10-07, 11:15 AM
  #1  
carleton
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Do It Yourself (DIY)

(Please reply with links and I'll edit this top post and add them to the lists)

Bike Mechanicing so easy, a caveman can do it.

Photo by Neddd

OK, kids. We are professional cyber-cyclists. Don't try this stuff at home. If you do, you do it at your own risk. Remember, these are the ramblings of wannabe know-it-alls who spend more time on the computer than our bikes...so we can't be held responsible if you lose a finger (or two).

Now that that is out of the way, on to the good stuff.



BFSSFG Do-It-Yourself (DIY) solutions:

Wheels:
- A Dial-Gauge Bicycle Wheel Building Stand for $100 by Chuck Connell

Hubs:
- Tighten and loosen a cog without a chainwhip AKA: Rotafixa Method
- How to mod a Surly Tuggnut chain tensioner to work with Campy 1010 or similar horizontal dropouts by mander
- Replace the bearings on your formula hub by dirtyphotons

Rims:
- Dropping nipples into deep v style rims by luvthemas

Headsets:
- Maintain that sexy (or not so sexy) track headset by [165]

Bottom Brackets:
- Maintain that sexy (or not so sexy) track BB by [165]

Handlebars:
- How to tape bullhorns (or any type bar, really) by c0urt

Cranks:

Pedals
- How to repack your pedals, especially if they are MKS Sylvans. by queerpunk
- DMR V8 - Pedal Rebuild by lymbzero
- KKT Top Run Pedal Rebuild - by Retem
- I made some Toshi-style double toe straps! by hockeyteeth
- DIY Double Strap Holders by dubteka
- Super Sketch Double Strap Holders by yellowjeep

Frames:
- Make yourself some track dropouts by AfterThisNap
- Spraypainting a frame
- Project Centurian to Barracuda Mk. I - Official Progress Thread. by cuda2k

Tools:
- essential tools for a fixie rider?
- Tools
- Tools YOU never bike without
- Convert a 3/32" Chain Whip to fit 1/8" AND 3/32" cogs by Carleton
- Homemade Lockring Tool by silent1

Buying the Right Bike:
- A discussion of budget fixed-specific frames/complete bikes

Miscellany:
- Karl's gear inch worksheet
- Skid Patch Theorem by Fraction
- How to not get your bike stolen... by Carleton
- De-anodising (anodizing - for the stateside) and polishing a Cinelli quill stem by jol
- Re-cover your saddle by SingleSpeeDemon
- DIY Toptube Pad by marqueemoon
- Give your back a break from those pointy objects in your bag by Gyeswho
- How To Make a Bike Polo Mallet by tink20seven
- Leather Saddle Restoration by VT tallbike
- DIY Beer opener by HandsomeRyan
- Polish Aluminum Parts by jol

"Ummm...how do I convert this thing?"

Photo by Skipp Thomsen

Last edited by carleton; 02-08-09 at 11:44 PM.
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Old 01-10-07, 12:04 PM
  #2  
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Added "Maintain that sexy (or not so sexy) track headset"

Thanks, OrgFarmCY
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Old 01-10-07, 12:07 PM
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how can i trap a child inside my wheel like that?
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Old 01-10-07, 12:07 PM
  #4  
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Originally Posted by carleton
[SIZE="2"]

Photo by Fingle
Locked in a wheel shaped cage, that's harsh
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Old 01-10-07, 01:06 PM
  #5  
DerekRI
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The budget comparison thread: Here
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Old 01-10-07, 01:18 PM
  #6  
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How to repack your pedals, especially if they are MKS Sylvans.

MKS Sylvans are simple, solid, popular pedals. The bearing quality is fine, but found that my left pedal's bearings went downhill when I lost the dustcap due to pedal strike during an alleycat. It's a simple equation: dirt sticks to grease, which turns bearings from smooth surfaces into, well, sandpaper. You can hear it, you can feel it, and it's not pretty.

To repack my pedal, I found myself using some less than ideal tools for the job. Here's the list:

1. degreaser in a little bowl.
2. rag.
3. 15mm wrench. (campy peanut butter wrench, which is thin-walled, would work very well)
4. pliers on a multitool (or, even better, 12mm wrench - for the locknut).
5. phil wood's waterproof grease.
6. Pencil.
7. 15-30 minutes of your time.

Step 1: For me, step one was to hit my pedal against the asphalt in New Haven hard enough to shatter the dustcap, but for you, it might be as simple as removing the dustcap, or maybe even just wondering where your dustcap went and why a new one costs $5, which is about a quarter of the price of a set of pedals, new.

Step 2.a: Take your pedal apart. I generally don't like pliers, because they chew up nuts more than an appropriate-sized wrench does. However, I didn't have the right sized wrench, nor did I have a small, nimble adjustable that would fit the locknut. I used the pliers to loosen and remove the locknut. Being firm, gentle, and not slipping will lower your chance of slipping and gouging the nut unrecognizable. Then, I used the 15mm wrench to loosen and remove the cone. I had to stick the wrench in along the rotational axis and just nibble at the cone with it, because the cone is pretty well covered by the pedal body. A low-profile socket wrench would be a far superior tool here.

Step 2.b: Using a rag to make sure that the ballbearings don't fall all over the place, remove the pedal body from the spindle. You'll notice that, like a hub, the cone of the 2 bearing assemblies is part of the pedal body, and the cup on the inside bearing is just part of the spindle, meaning that one locknut and cone is what holds both bearing assemblies together. Gather all the ballbearings (you might need the pencil to poke them out) and let them sit in the degreaser with the locknut and cone.

Step 3: Dip your rag in degreaser and clean off the bearing surfaces. Remove all grease. I like to put the rag on the pencil and clean out the inside of the pedal, too, just to remove any grease that fell in there if the ballbearings decided to take the long way out.

Step 4: After those bearings and nuts have degreased, wipe them down with a rag to make sure you get rid of any clingy bits of old, gross grease.

Step 5: Using that delightful Phil Waterproof Grease, layer grease on the bearing surface on the inside (crankside) bearing assembly of the pedal. Plop a lot in there, but don't just squirt it in to the pedal - place it all in the cup there. One by one, but the bearings back in; you might use the pencil to push them into the grease just a bit so that they don't get in the way when you put the pedal back on to the spindle. If I recall correctly, each side has 11 bearings. When you're done with this, slide the pedal body back on to the spindle.

Step 6: repeat step 6, but for the outside bearing assembly.

Step 7: apply just a bit of crease on to the spindle threads. Gently screw the cone down until it gets snug against the bearings. Do the same for the locknut.

Step 8: now here's the tricky part - tightening the locknut and the cone at the right spot, so that there's no play in the pedal, but the bearings are not too tight. I found it worked to tighten the cone down, and then moderately tighten the locknut, and then back the cone off against the locknut. Any time you're moving one of them against the other, you'll need to hold both, lest they spin together. It was awkward with pliers and sticking the wrench in, but it worked. Make sure that the locknut and the cone are tight against each other, so that the pedal bearing assemblies won't loosen up while you're riding.

Step 9: Optional. Order a new dustcap from where ever, like Trackstar which I know sells them on their website. Furrow your brow over the $5 price. Wait patiently. When it comes, eagerly open the package, and then screw it on, protecting your pedal re-pack job. Put the pedal back on and ride.

NOTES:
Even with exposed bearings, I haven't repacked since July, and my bearings are as smooth as I need them to be.

If you're dealing with old pedals with some rusted parts, WD-40 might be a good idea to break up some of the rust so that you can loosen those nuts and take apart the pedal. Be sure to thoroughly clean, degrease, and regrease though.

I don't know of a wrench that can grab the cone nut and leave room for something to grab the locknut. I'm interested in hearing how other people might do this. EDIT: i'm told that the campy peanut butter wrench is good for this - it's thin-walled, so it will fit in the pedal to hold the cone, and then you can use a 12mm wrench for the locknut, through the hole in the campy pb wrench.

I'll add pictures when I do this again. Don't know when that will be since I did such a winning job the first time.

thanks thurstonboise.

Last edited by queerpunk; 01-12-07 at 10:37 AM.
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Old 01-10-07, 01:39 PM
  #7  
fix
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LoFarkas' disc hub cog thread was awesome. Throw that in there.
Possibly dig up a thread about the rotafix? (Start debate HERE)
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Old 01-10-07, 01:42 PM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by fix
LoFarkas' disc hub cog thread was awesome. Throw that in there.
Possibly dig up a thread about the rotafix? (Start debate HERE)
no need for a debate about rotafix. just frame it as "tighten and loosen a cog without a chainwhip" and remind people to put a rag around their bb shell.
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Old 01-10-07, 01:57 PM
  #9  
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I really like this thread idea. Nice work Carleton.

Luvthemas just posted a "Avoid dropping nipples into Deep-V's"
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Old 01-10-07, 02:02 PM
  #10  
carleton
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Thanks guys!

I've located a few on my own. Please include links so I don't have to go hunting around.
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Old 01-10-07, 02:04 PM
  #11  
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There are probably a few on the subject of dropping nipples into deep v style rims. Here is mine https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=259808
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Old 01-10-07, 02:13 PM
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Requests:

I would like to see a picture of slipjoint pliers or visegrips converted into a lockring wrench.

Also I want to know how to take apart SPD's.

Also I know this is getting a little OT for this forum but if anyone has made DIY leather mudflaps a tutorial would be cool.
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Old 01-10-07, 06:39 PM
  #13  
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This is the pair of pliers that I used to build my lockring tool. If you look at the tool the ends are tapered to just about the same size as the notches on the lockring. All you have to do is use a metal file to file the edges so everything is square and the tool will not slip out of the notches. You want the plier ends to have as much contact with the notches as possible. Once you actually buy the pliers you will see how easy it is. I have never had mine slip and when I first started using them I just used the stock pliers, without the filing of the jaws, and never had a problem.
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Old 01-10-07, 10:13 PM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by queerpunk
How to repack your pedals, especially if they are MKS Sylvans.

MKS Sylvans are simple, solid, popular pedals. The bearing quality is fine, but found that my left pedal's bearings went downhill when I lost the dustcap due to pedal strike during an alleycat. It's a simple equation: dirt sticks to grease, which turns bearings from smooth surfaces into, well, sandpaper. You can hear it, you can feel it, and it's not pretty.

To repack my pedal, I found myself using some less than ideal tools for the job. Here's the list:

1. degreaser in a little bowl.
2. rag.
3. 15mm wrench.
4. pliers on a multitool.
5. phil wood's waterproof grease.
6. Pencil.
7. 15-30 minutes of your time.

Step 1: For me, step one was to hit my pedal against the asphalt in New Haven hard enough to shatter the dustcap, but for you, it might be as simple as removing the dustcap, or maybe even just wondering where your dustcap went and why a new one costs $5, which is about a quarter of the price of a set of pedals, new.

Step 2.a: Take your pedal apart. I generally don't like pliers, because they chew up nuts more than an appropriate-sized wrench does. However, I didn't have the right sized wrench, nor did I have a small, nimble adjustable that would fit the locknut. I used the pliers to loosen and remove the locknut. Being firm, gentle, and not slipping will lower your chance of slipping and gouging the nut unrecognizable. Then, I used the 15mm wrench to loosen and remove the cone. I had to stick the wrench in along the rotational axis and just nibble at the cone with it, because the cone is pretty well covered by the pedal body. A low-profile socket wrench would be a far superior tool here.

Step 2.b: Using a rag to make sure that the ballbearings don't fall all over the place, remove the pedal body from the spindle. You'll notice that, like a hub, the cone of the 2 bearing assemblies is part of the pedal body, and the cup on the inside bearing is just part of the spindle, meaning that one locknut and cone is what holds both bearing assemblies together. Gather all the ballbearings (you might need the pencil to poke them out) and let them sit in the degreaser with the locknut and cone.

Step 3: Dip your rag in degreaser and clean off the bearing surfaces. Remove all grease. I like to put the rag on the pencil and clean out the inside of the pedal, too, just to remove any grease that fell in there if the ballbearings decided to take the long way out.

Step 4: After those bearings and nuts have degreased, wipe them down with a rag to make sure you get rid of any clingy bits of old, gross grease.

Step 5: Using that delightful Phil Waterproof Grease, layer grease on the bearing surface on the inside (crankside) bearing assembly of the pedal. Plop a lot in there, but don't just squirt it in to the pedal - place it all in the cup there. One by one, but the bearings back in; you might use the pencil to push them into the grease just a bit so that they don't get in the way when you put the pedal back on to the spindle. If I recall correctly, each side has 11 bearings. When you're done with this, slide the pedal body back on to the spindle.

Step 6: repeat step 6, but for the outside bearing assembly.

Step 7: apply just a bit of crease on to the spindle threads. Gently screw the cone down until it gets snug against the bearings. Do the same for the locknut.

Step 8: now here's the tricky part - tightening the locknut and the cone at the right spot, so that there's no play in the pedal, but the bearings are not too tight. I found it worked to tighten the cone down, and then moderately tighten the locknut, and then back the cone off against the locknut. Any time you're moving one of them against the other, you'll need to hold both, lest they spin together. It was awkward with pliers and sticking the wrench in, but it worked. Make sure that the locknut and the cone are tight against each other, so that the pedal bearing assemblies won't loosen up while you're riding.

Step 9: Optional. Order a new dustcap from where ever, like Trackstar which I know sells them on their website. Furrow your brow over the $5 price. Wait patiently. When it comes, eagerly open the package, and then screw it on, protecting your pedal re-pack job. Put the pedal back on and ride.

NOTES:
Even with exposed bearings, I haven't repacked since July, and my bearings are as smooth as I need them to be.

If you're dealing with old pedals with some rusted parts, WD-40 might be a good idea to break up some of the rust so that you can loosen those nuts and take apart the pedal. Be sure to thoroughly clean, degrease, and regrease though.

I don't know of a wrench that can grab the cone nut and leave room for something to grab the locknut. I'm interested in hearing how other people might do this.

I'll add pictures when I do this again. Don't know when that will be since I did such a winning job the first time.
Good post. I'd like to add a few more things:
1. The locknut is 12mm.
2. A thin walled 15mm socket is good for getting the cone out easily.
3. You are correct, 11 bearings per race.

Sylvans are nice but the outer bearing races were dry when I cracked them open. I guess it's pretty common. A grease gun with a needle tip will fit in if you don't want to take them apart.

Oh yeah, the campy peanut butter wrench is the correct tool for holding the cone while you tighten the locknut.
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Old 01-10-07, 10:34 PM
  #15  
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whipped this up today at work. (HAH. i made a punny)



DIY CHAINWHIP! itll survive the imminent nuclear winter, no doubt! (i was really bored)

Last edited by onetwentyeight; 01-10-07 at 10:43 PM.
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Old 01-10-07, 10:37 PM
  #16  
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that is sick, i'll give you $10
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Old 01-10-07, 10:39 PM
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funny, thats about what my friend just offered me to make him one. i told him give me the materials and buy me a nice lunch and we'll call it even.

whee mig welders!
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Old 01-10-07, 10:41 PM
  #18  
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DIY chain whip: rotafix method

DIY lockring wrench: hammer and a screwdriver/cold chisel
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Old 01-10-07, 10:58 PM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by SamHouston
Locked in a wheel shaped cage, that's harsh
those are actually the new Zipp H666s - The Human Disc wheel (rear only)

rotafix:
https://204.73.203.34/fisso/eng/schpignone.htm
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Old 01-10-07, 11:14 PM
  #20  
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I'm building three wheelsets in the next couple of weeks, so I'll make an appropriate thread with lots of pictures. I realize there are a couple books out there documenting in detail this process, but I think they're prohibitively expensive.
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Old 01-10-07, 11:31 PM
  #21  
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I've used the Sheldon method of wheelbuilding for the (counts) 13 wheels I've built.
__________________
Originally Posted by CardiacKid View Post
I explained that he could never pay me enough cash for the amount of work I had put into that bike and the only way to compensate me for it was to ride the hell out of it.
IRO Angus Casati Gold Line
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Old 01-10-07, 11:42 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by el twe
I've used the Sheldon method of wheelbuilding for the (counts) 13 wheels I've built.
Not many pictures of the process; just a schematic. The rationale for materials and lacing choices is great, though! Since I haven't been around the block with regards to wheel building, I'll be focusing more on the visuals...hell, it might not even be as worthwhile as I was hoping. Maybe a hub version of Josh's headset/bb thread would be a better idea.
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Old 01-10-07, 11:55 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by scotthorrigan
that is sick, i'll give you $10
If you need anything like that welded, hand me some parts at the next group ride or blitz that i'm at, and I'll get it welded. If you pm me and give me some time, it's possible that I will just run across the parts in a day's work (aside from bike chain) and be able to set them aside for you.
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Old 01-11-07, 12:45 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by fix
LoFarkas' disc hub cog thread was awesome. Throw that in there.
I think I tried the same thing.


It helps to use a piece of PVC pipe (or anything round) the same diameter as the inside of the splines, so you can slot the rotor and cog on to mark the hole positions. Make sure to use a good drill bit (I broke a couple, they were dead cheap crappy ones) otherwise you'll be there forever. I found it best to drill one hole, bolt it to the hub, then drill the other 5. Dead easy to do (and it was cheaper than buying a new hub).

It is easier with a loose ball hub, because the axles are easier to get. Otherwise, get some machined for cartridge, but the cost of that defeats the purpose.
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Old 01-11-07, 12:57 AM
  #25  
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Keep 'em coming!
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