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Quick Release on rear wheel?

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Quick Release on rear wheel?

Old 04-06-07, 07:22 AM
  #1  
Strong Bad
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Quick Release on rear wheel?

I put a quick release on my front wheel of my fixed, mainly so I can clamp the fork easily in my truck's bike rack.
I have hollow axles in the rear and can easily convert it to QR also. Should I?
Will a QR clamp tight enough for a fixed gear bike?
Anyone got any experiences with it?
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Old 04-06-07, 07:25 AM
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it makes no difference for the front. As long as you have a decent quality QR(internal cam good teeth) it will be fine in the back too.
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Old 04-06-07, 08:18 AM
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Your other option is wing nuts - cheaper and easier.
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Old 04-06-07, 08:33 AM
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bad, bad idea.
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Old 04-06-07, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikkhu
bad, bad idea.
Wing nuts? Guys have won the Tour de France on bikes with wing nuts. $2 from your local DIY store,
or perhaps should I say 2 from your local K-Rauta
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Old 04-06-07, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikkhu
bad, bad idea.
Thanks, but could you eblaberate?
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Old 04-06-07, 08:51 AM
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wing nuts should be fine for the front, but the rear?
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Old 04-06-07, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Strong Bad
Thanks, but could you eblaberate?
Why would you want something designed to allow your rear tire to be easily removed? There are alot of forces being applied to your rear wheel when you skip/skid. In theroy, the energy transfer could remove your wheel from your drop outs (think forward facing drop outs), but I don't thing it would be as big of a deal if you have track ends. Basically, you will probably not be able to get your QR to be as tight as track nuts to hold the wheel in place.
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Old 04-06-07, 09:03 AM
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In the days before QRs everyone used wing nuts on the rear - just make sure the 'wings' are long enough to ensure you can hand tighten them enough. Like I said above, guys used to race major Tours on bikes with wingnuts on the rear (because they rode what we now call flipflop hubs, one cog was best for the flat the other for climbing, when a hill approached, the whole field would stop and flip their wheels).

"Passo Croce d'Aune - you may recognize this as the name of a Campagnolo component group in the late 1980s and early 1990s. This is due to the fact that it was at the top of this very pass that Tullio Campagnolo had his legendary epiphany. He was competing in a springtime race in the 1930s that included the Passo Croce d'Aune, then dirt. At the time, riders had single-speed bikes with a cog on either side of the rear wheel of different sizes. They rode up the passes with the larger cog and flipped the wheel around at the top to take advantage of the smaller cog for the descent. On this fateful day, it was snowing and cold. Campagnolo's hands were too frozen to unscrew his wing nuts holding his rear hub into his frame. As a solution to this problem, he invented the quick-release skewer."


https://cgi.ebay.com/Maxi-Car-Grandes...QQcmdZViewItem
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Old 04-06-07, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by 1fluffhead
Why would you want something designed to allow your rear tire to be easily removed? There are alot of forces being applied to your rear wheel when you skip/skid. In theroy, the energy transfer could remove your wheel from your drop outs (think forward facing drop outs), but I don't thing it would be as big of a deal if you have track ends. Basically, you will probably not be able to get your QR to be as tight as track nuts to hold the wheel in place.

possibly because you want to easily remove the rear wheel without tools and maybe save a little weight while your at it.

It is true that you won't be able to get a QR as tight as you can a bolt with a long wrench. However, people rode for a long time with horizontal dropouts and QRs. You have to clamp then down harder then most people are used to these days but if you do it right they don't slip that often. If the wheel does slip, as long as you don't have the axle at the very front of horizontal dropouts, it will hit the chainstay before the wheel falls out.

Maybe if you need to rely on chain tension to stop your bike it's a bad idea but simply doing that is putting yourself at much larger risk then using a QR.
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Old 04-06-07, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by dutret
save a little weight while your at it.


Save some weight? LOL The difference is so miniscule.
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Old 04-06-07, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Strong Bad
Thanks, but could you eblaberate?
Empirical studies. Rear came loose in a skip, ass saved by cheapo BMX chain tightener. Scared myself silly. Trust me on this one.
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Old 04-06-07, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikkhu
Empirical studies. Rear came loose in a skip, ass saved by cheapo BMX chain tightener. Scared myself silly. Trust me on this one.
What kind of QR did you have?
Was it as tight as you could reasonable get it?
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Old 04-06-07, 09:37 AM
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In my experience the best QR skewers that I have used have been steel campy skewers (with the curved handle, never used anything older). You can really clamp the crap out of them.
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Old 04-06-07, 09:41 AM
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Old 04-06-07, 09:45 AM
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$24,000 for a hubset? Yow!
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Old 04-06-07, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by dutret
What kind of QR did you have?
Was it as tight as you could reasonable get it?
Shimano something, yeah - it was so tight I had to use my 15mm wrench to lever the skewer open
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Old 04-06-07, 09:57 AM
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If you tighten any QR properly it should work fine. People use them all the time on geared, freewheeling bikes, which as you know actually puts a lot more force on the wheel than on a fixed gear.
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Old 04-06-07, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by blickblocks
If you tighten any QR properly it should work fine. People use them all the time on geared, freewheeling bikes, which as you know actually puts a lot more force on the wheel than on a fixed gear.
"dunno, sounds like bull**** to me"
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Old 04-06-07, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by 1fluffhead
Save some weight? LOL The difference is so miniscule.
Except for the wrench you need in case of rear flat.
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Old 04-06-07, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by endform
In my experience the best QR skewers that I have used have been steel campy skewers (with the curved handle, never used anything older). You can really clamp the crap out of them.
This is eactly what I use on my SS and have had no slippage problems (I run a 45-16). You want to make sure you use a steel rear QR with a closed cap (not the open cam style like Salsa Ti Skewers). Shimano and Campy both sell quality closed cap rear skewers that should work just fine. That said, I ride a SS and have no idea if a QR is a bad ideafor a FG (but since you did not mention what you ride...)

The thing you are looking for is that the QR end-caps are steel. Aluminum is too soft and will tend to skoot over time.
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Old 04-06-07, 06:53 PM
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I agree with Dutret. Have used a Campy NR steel QR on my vintage conversion with NO slippage. My LBS recommends this to all his customers who ride FG. Gerry
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Old 04-06-07, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Bikkhu
"dunno, sounds like bull**** to me"
+1 before i got a legit track hub back in the day, i had a ghetto fixed wheel that used quick release. long story short, i tightened properly and everything and it still would slip. never use quickrelease for a fixed gear bike.

edit: just read what geraldchan said and i guess i cant justify my 'theory' because ive never tried a campy steel quick release.
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Old 04-07-07, 06:40 AM
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The problem is not so much whether or not a QR will slip, but rather what will happen if it does. On my geared Surly Crosscheck, my QR has slipped a few times, and the only consequence (save for the time momentary *********** resulted in it sliding completely free of the dropout) was that the bike started to make a little noise and not shift very well.

But on a fixed gear, a small slip could result in a chain derailment which would be very bad in terms of physical pain and bike damage.
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Old 04-07-07, 08:33 AM
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I have hollow axle track hubs and I'm strongly considering going Q/R (or Delta Axle Rodz) in the rear. I've also got a Tuggnut, which has a handy little insert for skinny Q/R axles to prevent slipping:



15mm wrenches are a pain in the ass.
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