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Re-dishing the rear wheel for SS use

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Re-dishing the rear wheel for SS use

Old 05-31-07, 08:50 AM
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keejrh
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Re-dishing the rear wheel for SS use

I'm converting my Miyata 110 to a SS and want to use the 27 inch wheels that are already on the bike. It's a newer wheelset with LOTS of life still in them, so I would rather not purchase new wheels. I've read about re-dishing a wheel, but my mechanical skills fall short when it comes to wheels. I'm wondering if this is something that a LBS would be able to do, and how much to expect them to charge if they can provide this service. And, will the integrity of the wheel remain if it is re-dished. Thanks!
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Old 05-31-07, 09:03 AM
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I can at least say that redishing the wheel shouldn't affect its integrity, if you're centering the wheel, you'll be actually improving its strenght, drive side spokes might need to be changed since they're usually at least 2mm shorter

How much dishing required is another story, you would also like to replace the BB with the shortest possible width (just enough chainstay clearance) to reduce the amount of dishing and axe respacing
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Old 05-31-07, 10:00 AM
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You'll only need to redish if you are respacing the axle, and you only need to respace your axle if you need to adjust the chainline...If it is a "newer" wheelset like you say, it probably has a cassette on it, so you can adjust the chainline without respacing the axle.
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Old 05-31-07, 10:03 AM
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Aeroplane is right about using bunch of spacers on a freehub, I was refering to a freewheel
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Old 05-31-07, 11:43 AM
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Re-dishing the wheel is easy peasy. I'm not a wheel man and I've done a couple wheels like that. First, you respace your axle so you know where you are at. The, you mark your starter spoke with a piece of tape. Working one spoke at a time, loosen the drive side 1/2 turn, tighten the non-drive side 1/2 turn. Continue until you have gone completely around the wheel. You can judge your progress, then decide if you want to go a full turn on the spokle nipple, or continue with 1/2 turns. Take your time and your wheel should end up centered and true.

Good luck and have fun!

Mark
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Old 05-31-07, 11:49 AM
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well, redishing isnt even completely necessary. ive set up a bunch of singlespeeds, including my own without redishing and they all worked fine. if you are considering ever reverting the wheel to multispeed use, leave it as it is. but if you want to be a "purist" take it to a shop, they can do it no problem and this will assure the best results if you arent already familiar with wheel work.
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Old 05-31-07, 11:50 AM
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Isn't it relative to the initial spoke tension? If they were loose on the drive side to begin with (most machine built wheels are), I'll start by tightening the non drive side until I bring it near 20's, then do it the way you describe by loosening the non drive side then tightening the drive side

When it's centered or properly dished, you'll want to check if the spoke is sticking out too far out the nipples (inside the rim), you'll unfortunatly have to shorten them or replace with shorter spokes like I mentioned earlier
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Old 05-31-07, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by roadgator
well, redishing isnt even completely necessary. ive set up a bunch of singlespeeds, including my own without redishing and they all worked fine. if you are considering ever reverting the wheel to multispeed use, leave it as it is. but if you want to be a "purist" take it to a shop, they can do it no problem and this will assure the best results if you arent already familiar with wheel work.
On a free wheel wheel, you would have to thread on some bottom bracket lockrings, or something to act as spacers. The low-buck way is to re-dish and it's not that complicated. I did two wheels in this manner with great results. Didn't have to cut down any spokes, either. It was actually a pretty fun project.

Mark
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Old 05-31-07, 07:03 PM
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Ok, I'll give you the view point of a LBS bicycle mechanic (since I am one :-D). First off, if you have never used a spoke wrench before, there are a couple of books on building wheels that I would suggest you pick up. They all say pretty much the same thing, but it will help you fully understand how to build/true/and dish wheels.

Ok if your wheel is a cassette hub wheel, this is easy, get spacers for the cog and line up the chain line. Don't do anything with the dishing of the wheel since if it's a cassette hub, IT'S ALREADY DISHED. Since you have more than likely already realized this, I'm going to continue to explain about switching hub spacing and dishing.

Now, if you wanted to get your LBS to redish the wheel for you, it would probably cost anywhere around $60. That is assuming that the LBS charges $1 per minute ($60 per hour). Here's what needs to be done:
1) The spacers that are currently on the drive and non-drive sides need to be switched. This can be done fairly easily without removing the entire axle, so if the LBS says they need to do that, they're full of sh%^.

2) Once the spacers are switched, the chainline should be almost completely inline. If it isn't and you don't want to go through the hassel of switching out the spacers again, just use a 1/8" chain instead of a 3/32" :-D (I've found that the 1/8" chain has more room for error side to side, which is very nice)!

3) Re-dish the wheel. Ok, I've heard this from my boss more than once. The spoke wrench is potentially one of the most expensive tools you will ever use. Note: I didn't say "buy," I said "USE." You can quite easily screw up the wheel. If you want to save some money at the LBS, change out the spacers at home and ask them to only re-dish the wheel for you. The only real way to know the trueness and the correct dish of a wheel is using a truing stand and dish tool. Your LBS will have these, and will more than likely be glad to do it for you.

Best of luck, and happy readings if you get one of those books! :-D

~FixedHippy
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Old 06-02-07, 08:46 AM
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I did it yesterday, worked great, took me a hour at most

Started by only tightening non drive side and brough the tension near 20's and then started losening drive side/tightning non drive side all around the valve
At some point I only loosened the drive side, when done dishing, I got lucky and had nearly no truing to do
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