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Low Cost fixie parts?

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Low Cost fixie parts?

Old 11-15-07, 07:53 AM
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koine2002
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Low Cost fixie parts?

I don't know if this has been beaten to death. I'm building up a fixie since I've acquired a Ross Gran Tour Frame (really cheap) and with all the spare parts I have (including what came off of the Ross), I'm only needing a ss/fg crank and a flip/flop (or track) hub to build onto one of my rims. Anyone know of some decent sources for low cost parts in that variety (I don't want to put a lot of money into it as it's a cheapo frame). I'm keeping an eye on ebay and AE Bike has some parts (Sugino R48 Crank or something like that and a flip flopper). Any other ideas? This is going to be a commuter/grocery store/winter training bike.
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Old 11-15-07, 07:55 AM
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craigslist?

but it seems that you've answered your own question
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Old 11-15-07, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by jdms mvp View Post
craigslist?

but it seems that you've answered your own question
Not necessarily, just letting you know where I've searched and that I'm just looking for more ideas.
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Old 11-15-07, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by koine2002 View Post
I don't know if this has been beaten to death. I'm building up a fixie since I've acquired a Ross Gran Tour Frame (really cheap) and with all the spare parts I have (including what came off of the Ross), I'm only needing a ss/fg crank and a flip/flop (or track) hub to build onto one of my rims. Anyone know of some decent sources for low cost parts in that variety (I don't want to put a lot of money into it as it's a cheapo frame). I'm keeping an eye on ebay and AE Bike has some parts (Sugino R48 Crank or something like that and a flip flopper). Any other ideas? This is going to be a commuter/grocery store/winter training bike.
You don't really need a ss/fg crank. A road double with the chainring mounted on the inside of the spider should do you just fine.

You can always run a suicide hub if you want to make it really cheap and don't plan on skidding. You can just respace, redish, loctitie your cog on and go your merry way. If that doesn't do it for you, go pick up a formula for $40 with the money you saved by not buying track cranks.
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Old 11-15-07, 08:37 AM
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If you're looking for really cheap cranks, RPM or bulletproof are good. Lots of people use rocket rings, I've put about 2000 miles on them and haven't been happy with the durability, I'd say spring for a little more. You need to get the correct bolt circle diameter chainring, the above cranks are both 110. Don't forget short stack bolts to put it all together. I forget what bottom bracket length those cranks take, but search on here or look at vendors' sites and you'll find it. Someone might chime in and know. This will be $60-$80 by the time you get it all together. Old road doubles used to be a good option, but the prices on ebay have been driven up. Try a local shop for a set, they might have something in the parts bins.

Relacing an old rim to a new hub is a waste of time unless the rim is something really nice, by the time you buy new spokes a new wheel is only $20 more or so. Many of us have been happy with the wheelsets from bicyclewheels.com, they run $140 or so plus shipping. Don't forget tires, tubes, and rim tape ($50), plus a cog and lock ring ($30).

Moral of the story: conversions are rarely worth it unless the frame is really nice. Some Ross bikes are OK, but still, skip the whole fixed thing, make it a singlespeed if you really want to futz with it, that costs $20 for a freewheel, and pick up a cheap complete bike if you want fixed.
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Old 11-15-07, 08:37 AM
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Bulletproof cranks are super-cheap, but fugly. You can always just find a used road crankset on eBay or a down-to-earth bike shop. Did the Ross not come with a crank you can convert? Keep in mind the affordable "track" cranks like the Sugino RD are just regular road double cranks without one of the chainrings, so most old cranks are just as good.

For the hub, you could go super-cheap with a freewheel hub and some welding/epoxy. I'd definitely advise getting a proper fixed hub, and for $45, the IRO (i.e. Formula) is pretty much bombproof.

EDIT: clearly we were all posting similar thoughts at the same time.

Last edited by kyselad; 11-15-07 at 09:08 AM.
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Old 11-15-07, 08:48 AM
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i agree with huerro. you don't need a SS/FG crank at all. i've yet to run one. just use an old road double ($10-20) and get SS chainring bolts (you need the 'female' threaded part to be shorter to run one chainring) ($5-10)

your rear hub is going to be the part that you will need to drop some $$$ on. sorry, that's how it goes. everything else you can cheap out on, but just shell out the $45 or so and get a Formula/IRO/etc hub
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Old 11-15-07, 09:00 AM
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A couple of points: Read the Fixed Gear on the Cheap article at Sheldon's site. (https://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html).

I just did my conversion. I used the old hub after removing the freewheel (don't buy the special tool; just disassemble the freewheel), then put on the cog and a old bottom-bracket lock-ring. I got those to things at my LBS, along with a chain for $22. The secret: ask for "the cheapest cog you have." I am sure I am getting my moneys worth, but as a start, it is working well.
Rotofix the cog, then tighten the lock ring (old school bottom brackets had lock rings that fit perfectly.)

And finally, to save that last bit of beer money, when I removed the second chain ring, instead of spending $10 for shorter chain ring bolts, I spent $3 for SPACERS.

To the OP's question, though, what I did to find cheap parts was check out Harris Cyclery (links from Sheldon Brown's site) and maybe a couple others (try the Bike Forum sponsors) to get an idea of prices, then hit a couple of local bike stores. Fixies are so hip these days that more stores carry supplies. If the on-line stores are cheaper then shop on-line; otherwise, support your LBS.

hope that Helps.
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Old 11-15-07, 09:10 AM
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Yep- all you really need is an IRO hub, and short crank bolts and you're good to go
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Old 11-15-07, 09:12 AM
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I find a lot of stuff on the back of junk trucks and in front of houses in the better parts of Philly, so far Ive found like three frames and a few wheels including two fixed and one set of 700c wheels, in the trash! and I chased down a junk truck that had just pulled from in front of a house on 5th and Girard because I saw a set of drop bars sticking out of the back, when I finally caught up with him I asked him how much for the bike because I noticed it was an alloy bar, he says," Its a junk bike, I just got it from a cleanout, give me $10.00 for gas money and its yours, you gotta pull it out the back" I reached into my pocket and gave him the $10.00 thinking that the bars were worth at least that, so I take the bike out of the truck not paying to much attention to it, the guy drives off and I start to look it over, what do I see before me but a complete track bike! I got it home and it was still smelling of the chronic! so cruise around your town on trash day, and dont be afriad to chase down them junk trucks, youll be surprised what you might find
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Old 11-15-07, 09:24 AM
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^ I hate these stories. This **** never happens to me. Boo hoo.
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Old 11-15-07, 09:41 AM
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If you really wanted to cheap out on the cranks, don't bother with the short bolts or spacers, and leave the pther chainring on. Sure, it looks odd, but you'll save a few bucks and you can always pull it off later when you bring the bottles and cans back. If you're dealing with an old freewheel style rear wheel, rotofix on a cog, leave a brake or two on for emergencies, and go ride. Might not be the coolest conversion, but it will get you rolling. You can always upgrade/change from there.

That's what i did on my conversion. New (cheap) tires, tubes, bartape, cog, chain, parts bin cranks (road double, left both rings on), brakes, etc., probably ran about $50. I was mostly seeing if i'd even like riding fixed, so i cut down as many costs as i could. Now i'm looking into building up a wheelset and cleaning everything up.
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Old 11-15-07, 09:48 AM
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Oh, and the bike frame is an old Schwinn Traveler i found on trash day about 7-8 years ago. It was my main bike until it got replaced, 3-4 times. Now it's back to my main bike.
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Old 11-15-07, 06:22 PM
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+1 recommending Bulletproof. I've been riding a set for 3 years. They're so cheap.
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Old 11-15-07, 06:50 PM
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+bullet proofs if i can haul five drunk chicks on a pedal cab
they can haul you on a fixie.

plus i am running them and a rocket ring on my fixie.
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