Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

Fuji Gran Tourer SE frame converted into fixed gear?

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Fuji Gran Tourer SE frame converted into fixed gear?

Old 04-15-08, 08:41 PM
  #1  
openmindedgent
the uncarved block
Thread Starter
 
openmindedgent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: on the road
Posts: 240

Bikes: '13 Surly Troll (touring), '74 Peugeot PX-10E (fixed gear), '94 Mongoose Rockadile (trail)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Fuji Gran Tourer SE frame converted into fixed gear?

I just stripped down an old bike I found in the back of the shop I work in and filed off the cable stays and specks of rust. I was wondering if the frame would be suitable to convert into a fixie to play around on for the summer. I can order whatever I need in time but for now I want to put it together because I am impatient. Steel frame, vertical dropouts, etc. I am worried it might be a bit too small but I can work with it for now. How can I get a fixed gear hub out of a regular single speed hub or a casette hub? Is this possible? I can wait for safety reasons but I am very mechanically minded and I can try and do something with what I've got so I want to try it out. Let me know.
openmindedgent is offline  
Old 04-15-08, 08:43 PM
  #2  
tinydr
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
the vertical dropouts will complicate things a bit in terms of chain tension, but it can be worked around.
 
Old 04-15-08, 08:44 PM
  #3  
peugotpigeon
mauve avenger
 
peugotpigeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: San Rafael, CA
Posts: 181
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ive got vert dropouts and it can be worked around, however i did have a white industries hub to use
good luck!
peugotpigeon is offline  
Old 04-15-08, 10:10 PM
  #4  
openmindedgent
the uncarved block
Thread Starter
 
openmindedgent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: on the road
Posts: 240

Bikes: '13 Surly Troll (touring), '74 Peugeot PX-10E (fixed gear), '94 Mongoose Rockadile (trail)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I apologize for being a moron... Vertical is up and down, horizontal is left to right. The dropouts are horizontal. It is a very early 80's model and it has very nice horizontal dropouts which are not rear-insert but are surely horizontal and will be just fine for tension of the chain. My main issue is with constructing a fixed hub without having to order special parts my shop doesnt already have. The mountain bike I ride daily is vertical and I believe vertical started in the 90's because I have never seen vertical on older bikes. Let me know what I can safely rig to get started in the wonderful world of fixies.
openmindedgent is offline  
Old 04-15-08, 11:13 PM
  #5  
MrCjolsen
Senior Member
 
MrCjolsen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Davis CA
Posts: 3,959

Bikes: Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
First, you remove the freewheel or "cluster" as it was often called. Then you get spacers and move the hub over on the axle until the threads line up... aw forget it. Just google "Sheldon Brown fixed gear." Read it over and over again until you figure out what to do.
MrCjolsen is offline  
Old 04-15-08, 11:15 PM
  #6  
huerro
Villainous
 
huerro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Austin
Posts: 1,894

Bikes: Trek 420, Cyclops

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by openmindedgent View Post
I apologize for being a moron... Vertical is up and down, horizontal is left to right. The dropouts are horizontal. It is a very early 80's model and it has very nice horizontal dropouts which are not rear-insert but are surely horizontal and will be just fine for tension of the chain. My main issue is with constructing a fixed hub without having to order special parts my shop doesnt already have. The mountain bike I ride daily is vertical and I believe vertical started in the 90's because I have never seen vertical on older bikes. Let me know what I can safely rig to get started in the wonderful world of fixies.
I don't know about this particular model, but one thing you need to consider is that touring frames tend to have lower bottom brackets than road race or track bikes. This could cause an issue with pedal strike when cornering. Not saying it will, but it may.

There are many hub options. The safest, easiest, and probably cheapest if you don't already have a hub you want to use is to purchase a track hub. You can also make it work with a freewheel hub with some thread locker, a freehub with a fixer, or a hub for disc brakes and a drilled cog.
huerro is offline  
Old 04-16-08, 05:58 AM
  #7  
openmindedgent
the uncarved block
Thread Starter
 
openmindedgent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: on the road
Posts: 240

Bikes: '13 Surly Troll (touring), '74 Peugeot PX-10E (fixed gear), '94 Mongoose Rockadile (trail)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by huerro View Post
a hub for disc brakes and a drilled cog.
Intesting... Attach a cog onto the hub instead of a disc or actually drill teeth into the disc attachment?
The latter sounds insane so I am sure you meant the former. I will give it a try and then fork up the cash for a real track hub and then eventually get a real track bike I have had my eye on.
openmindedgent is offline  
Old 04-16-08, 08:22 AM
  #8  
huerro
Villainous
 
huerro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Austin
Posts: 1,894

Bikes: Trek 420, Cyclops

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by openmindedgent View Post
Intesting... Attach a cog onto the hub instead of a disc or actually drill teeth into the disc attachment?
The latter sounds insane so I am sure you meant the former. I will give it a try and then fork up the cash for a real track hub and then eventually get a real track bike I have had my eye on.
That's the ticket. Here's one how to, and there are lots more out there.

https://www.fixedgeargallery.com/arti...mson/surlyhub/

EDIT: I would add, that it will still probably be cheaper to buy a track hub unless you have everything on hand already. To me the real benefit of this set up is the ease of changing cogs.

Last edited by huerro; 04-16-08 at 08:35 AM.
huerro is offline  
Old 04-16-08, 08:39 AM
  #9  
JACQU3S
liar
 
JACQU3S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: MONTREAL
Posts: 220
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Touring frames usualy make pretty poor fixed gear conversions. Long wheelbase, heavy tubing, low bottom bracket, slack steering geometry are intended for maximum stability while loaded (with cargo that is, not liquor). Not exacly a "racy" bike. However, since you've removed the cable guides (stays mean something different on a bicycle), effectively robbing the bike of it's intended functions... why not?
JACQU3S is offline  
Old 04-16-08, 03:12 PM
  #10  
huerro
Villainous
 
huerro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Austin
Posts: 1,894

Bikes: Trek 420, Cyclops

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JACQU3S View Post
Touring frames usualy make pretty poor fixed gear conversions. Long wheelbase, heavy tubing, low bottom bracket, slack steering geometry are intended for maximum stability while loaded (with cargo that is, not liquor). Not exacly a "racy" bike. However, since you've removed the cable guides (stays mean something different on a bicycle), effectively robbing the bike of it's intended functions... why not?
There's no reason a fixed gear bike has to be "racy." Some people might prefer the slack angles and ability to fit fenders and fat tires. Also, most touring bikes aren't make with particularly heavy tubing. It's all the **** you hang on them that makes them heavy.
huerro is offline  
Old 04-16-08, 04:32 PM
  #11  
MrCjolsen
Senior Member
 
MrCjolsen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Davis CA
Posts: 3,959

Bikes: Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I have a fixed gear built on an old touring frame. Love it. The ultimate fixed gear commuter.
MrCjolsen is offline  
Old 04-17-08, 11:20 AM
  #12  
openmindedgent
the uncarved block
Thread Starter
 
openmindedgent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: on the road
Posts: 240

Bikes: '13 Surly Troll (touring), '74 Peugeot PX-10E (fixed gear), '94 Mongoose Rockadile (trail)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JACQU3S View Post
Touring frames usualy make pretty poor fixed gear conversions. Long wheelbase, heavy tubing, low bottom bracket, slack steering geometry are intended for maximum stability while loaded (with cargo that is, not liquor). Not exacly a "racy" bike. However, since you've removed the cable guides (stays mean something different on a bicycle), effectively robbing the bike of it's intended functions... why not?
I would like to add that the naked frame is really lightweight and as far as the low bottom bracket is concerned, I live near the beach and I dont plan on having issues with high speed tight turns giving me a pedal scraping issue so I will not worry there, the big hills here are non-existant. I looked up stays on a bike and "duhhh". The stays are parts of the frame that make certain things "stay" in place. I am giving up on the fixed conversion here in regards to my lack of finances and I will just stick a freewheel on her and call it a day. I have my eyes on a nice and cheap fully built fixed gear and I will play on this "frankenstein" single speed until then. Pics up soon.
openmindedgent is offline  
Old 04-17-08, 01:04 PM
  #13  
bonechilling
Run What 'Ya Brung
 
bonechilling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 5,694
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JACQU3S View Post
Touring frames usualy make pretty poor fixed gear conversions. Long wheelbase, heavy tubing, low bottom bracket, slack steering geometry are intended for maximum stability while loaded (with cargo that is, not liquor). Not exacly a "racy" bike. However, since you've removed the cable guides (stays mean something different on a bicycle), effectively robbing the bike of it's intended functions... why not?
This is very, very bad advice.
bonechilling is offline  
Old 04-18-08, 10:13 PM
  #14  
openmindedgent
the uncarved block
Thread Starter
 
openmindedgent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: on the road
Posts: 240

Bikes: '13 Surly Troll (touring), '74 Peugeot PX-10E (fixed gear), '94 Mongoose Rockadile (trail)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bonechilling View Post
This is very, very bad advice.
Hah, glad to see I am not the only one who thought so. I only threw a few bucks down on the bike as far as new rims and tires, handle bars, freewheel, pedals, and a crank set. I am putting the chain and brakes on tomorrow and I will have pictures of my new single speed roadster on wen I am finished and have fully tested it out. I put a wider back rim and tire on than in the front and I am just hoping this is legit. I think it gives it a very cool look and I feel like it could be pretty fast also.
openmindedgent is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.