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Correct sitting position?

Old 10-08-09, 01:58 AM
  #1  
lovrin
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Correct sitting position?

Lately I've been riding and I've been noticing I'm sitting more on the front of my saddle where it starts getting skinnier. I mean I DO have a San Marco Ponza and it's skinny already, but it's starting to annoy me. I'm actually wondering what the "correct" sitting position on a saddle is.

Like where I should be sitting on it to get me to the most power in my pedal stroke. I just feel like where the middle to end of the saddle, which is where I'm sitting, doesn't feel right. I feel bobbing going down fast hills too and that annoys me a lot. I was thinking about moving my saddle forward a bit to see how that works out. Any suggestions?

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Old 10-08-09, 07:27 AM
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Im having a similar issue right now and in the past. I think you want to sit a bit back in the saddle, but I have to adjust mine as well. I find myself almost sliding towards the front and have to keep pushing myself back, but my saddle isn't even angled down.

I didnt have this problem on my friends 61 but having it on smaller bikes (56 and smaller) whichi sn't even small for me (5'10 with 34 inseam).

Part of it seems to be the height of my seat and reaching down for the bars, maybe I'll lower my seat a touch and raise the bars.
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Old 10-08-09, 08:14 AM
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I think moving the saddle forward helps when you experience bobbing. I had this problem with my MTB and I got the advice to move it forward from the peeps at MTBR.com
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Old 10-08-09, 08:30 AM
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Just try moving it around. It took me a week of trial and error to get my new b17 in proper position.
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Old 10-08-09, 09:50 AM
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if you're sitting all the way to the front of the saddle, meaning your body tends to gravitate to sitting there naturally then you need to adjust the fore/aft position of your saddle or you may even need a zero setback seatpost to help. If you're moving that far forward it wouldn't be a bad idea to ride a tri-saddle, they're extra padded towards the nose but that's only if you can't adjust your saddle position to where your sit bones are placed on the widest part of the saddle. You're worried about power but the reason triathletes sit that far forward is to use more of the hamstrings for power and conserve their calf muscles for the running portion of the race so sitting that far forward on the saddle won't give you that much more power anyways.
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Old 10-08-09, 02:16 PM
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The proper sitting position is with your ass-bones on the wide part of the saddle, which is usually pretty far back.

If you are sitting with your perineum on the narrow part of the saddle for more than a short ride, you're asking for some numbness if you're lucky. If you're not lucky, you could do some damage.
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Old 10-08-09, 02:57 PM
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First thing I do on a new bike is ride with an allen key in my pocket and experiment with bars, saddle, seatpost... after I eyeball it based off one of my other bikes.

If you don't experiment you will never get comfortable.
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Old 10-08-09, 03:50 PM
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unless you're hardcore racing, the primary concern when picking saddle position should be comfort, not power. grow some more muscles to get more power.
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Old 10-08-09, 04:39 PM
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Move the saddle forward in order to get your sit bones on the wide part, where they belong.

If you feel like you're slipping forward or if you have pressure on your hands / wrists, try tipping the nose of the saddle up a bit.
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Old 10-08-09, 04:52 PM
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Saddle position should be adjusted for pedaling issues, not ass comfort.

The first thing you should look at is your stem/frame--one or both may be too long, so you'd slide forward with too much reach into your bars.
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Old 10-08-09, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Sorrell View Post
Move the saddle forward in order to get your sit bones on the wide part, where they belong.

If you feel like you're slipping forward or if you have pressure on your hands / wrists, try tipping the nose of the saddle up a bit.
i disagree.
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Old 10-08-09, 08:42 PM
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i forgot which bike fitting site i looked at but i remember it saying that in the proper sitting position, when you look down at your forkends/track nuts, it should be obstructed by the handle bars. i've followed the advice and im really liking this sweet spot! i feel like i have a 50/50 balance.

oh yeah my entire butt fits on my turbo saddle. when i want to sprint i scoot back a little so from my gooch all the way to tail bone is supported. doesn't it hurt sitting on the front section of your seat? ouch! save your kids man!
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Old 10-08-09, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by adriano View Post
i disagree.
Well stated.
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Old 10-09-09, 02:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Samwiches View Post
Saddle position should be adjusted for pedaling issues, not ass comfort.

The first thing you should look at is your stem/frame--one or both may be too long, so you'd slide forward with too much reach into your bars.
If that's the case, just remove the saddle/post. Clearly it's just getting in your way.
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Old 10-09-09, 03:11 AM
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yeah, but he said he is bobbing up and down also, that could also be because your seat is too high and you are having to pivot your hips to cope with having to over reach slightly.
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Old 10-09-09, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Samwiches View Post
Saddle position should be adjusted for pedaling issues, not ass comfort.

The first thing you should look at is your stem/frame--one or both may be too long, so you'd slide forward with too much reach into your bars.

This can get complicated but once you get dialed in, it feels better and you have better pedaling.

Set the saddle height first; should have just a bit of bend to the knees at the lowest point. Set fore/aft saddle position by by setting your knee over the pedal spindle when your pedal is in the 3o'clock position(the KOPS method). This is a good starting point that works for a lot of people. If you had to move the saddle forward, you will have to adjust the height up a tad to compensate, down if you moved the saddle back.



Put hands on your favorite position on the bars. Try to remove them without moving the rest of your body. If you can't support yourself, you'll need to raise the bars and/or bring them closer to you. Shorter stem, higher stem angle, or if you've got a quill stem, raise it a bit. You can move the saddle forward a bit but you'll need to raise it if you do. You'll notice that when you raise the saddle, it changes the fore/aft position of the saddle so it's a "dialing in" process.

Each time you move the saddle or the stem or the seatpost it should be in very small increments of a few millimeters at a time once you've got it close.

If it is just a matter of flexibility or abdominal core strength, you can always change the stem as you improve.

You can try this fit calculator to see what you need. Since we don't have any of your or your bike's measurements, we can't be sure exactly what to suggest. The bike may be too large for you.

https://www.competitivecyclist.com/za...LCULATOR_INTRO
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Old 10-09-09, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Brian Sorrell View Post
Well stated.
i cannot say the same.

Originally Posted by Brian Sorrell View Post
Move the saddle forward in order to get your sit bones on the wide part, where they belong.

If you feel like you're slipping forward or if you have pressure on your hands / wrists, try tipping the nose of the saddle up a bit.
if you are slipping forward, move the saddle down, shorten the stem, or raise the handlebars.

if you are forward too much, move the saddle back or raise the handlebars.
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Old 10-09-09, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by adriano View Post
if you are slipping forward, move the saddle down, shorten the stem, or raise the handlebars.

if you are forward too much, move the saddle back or raise the handlebars.
That's more like it.
These could definitely do the trick too. We have little to work with here given that we have no pictures of the bike or other symptoms.
The things I listed have worked for other folks I've ridden with, but in those cases, we had a full picture of what was going on.

(The trouble with Internet-based troubleshooting / fitting.)
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Old 10-09-09, 11:15 PM
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Sorry for not responding in a while. I haven't been able to get out on it or change it lately because of the crappy weather here in New York. But I figured all I would do is need to move the saddle forward a bit to get my butt in the right position the seat, but since I am new to all of this still, I guess I was a bit wrong according to you guys! I mean I'll just move it forward to experiment and see how it works and if I still slip, we'll see what happens.

I feel like my saddle height is correct(assuming you meant move the saddle down, meaning height), and it's very comfortable because I used to feel some knee pain but all of that's gone, even on long distance rides, so I'm really iffy on moving it down, because I feel like it's in the best physical position for my knees with the slight bend at the bottom.
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Old 10-10-09, 12:05 AM
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Bobbing can also indicate problems with pedalstroke. OP might also take this opportunity to work on his spin.
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Old 10-10-09, 12:07 AM
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Originally Posted by lovrin View Post
Sorry for not responding in a while. I haven't been able to get out on it or change it lately because of the crappy weather here in New York. But I figured all I would do is need to move the saddle forward a bit to get my butt in the right position the seat, but since I am new to all of this still, I guess I was a bit wrong according to you guys! I mean I'll just move it forward to experiment and see how it works and if I still slip, we'll see what happens.

I feel like my saddle height is correct(assuming you meant move the saddle down, meaning height), and it's very comfortable because I used to feel some knee pain but all of that's gone, even on long distance rides, so I'm really iffy on moving it down, because I feel like it's in the best physical position for my knees with the slight bend at the bottom.
move it down and back.
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Old 10-10-09, 01:50 AM
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I'm not trying to diss your knowledge by any means, as you know a lot more than me and I know that for a fact, but moving it BACK? I had it lower before and any lower than what I had before was resulting in some knee pain, not unbearable, but where I have it now, I'm not getting any of that, on even further distance rides than I was riding before. I don't think that'd be healthy and/or help in anyway. Once again, not saying you don't know what you're talking about, but from what I know of my own bike, that wouldn't help.
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Old 10-10-09, 02:19 AM
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i thought you were had a forward leaning problem. try some combination of moving the saddle down a bit, shorting the stem, and raising the handlebars.
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Old 10-10-09, 02:22 AM
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Not so much leaning as naturally falling towards the front of the saddle, which is uncomfortable for me. The main point of this thread was wondering where exactly I should be sitting on my saddle hahaha. That and some help with the bobbing I'm having.

Last edited by lovrin; 10-10-09 at 02:32 AM.
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Old 10-10-09, 07:29 AM
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Are you bobbing at any cadence or just at a very high cadence(as when you are going very fast downhill)?
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