Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

nervous about going fixed...

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

nervous about going fixed...

Old 11-02-11, 11:07 AM
  #26  
Phil_gretz
Zip tie Karen
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Fair Oaks Ranch, TX
Posts: 7,005

Bikes: '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022, '21 Tsunami SNM-100

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1464 Post(s)
Liked 1,537 Times in 804 Posts
One More Thing...

Be conscious of "pedal strike" when making tight turns, as your inside pedal will pass through its lowest position. So, you'll have to get a sense of how much inward lean is too much, and how to use the periodicity of the pedals to your advantage when turning quickly. You'll get the knack...
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 11-02-11, 11:16 AM
  #27  
ianjk
:)
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: duluth
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: '07 Pista, '09 Fantom Cross Uno, '8? Miyata, '67 Stingray, '0? Zoo mod trials, Tallbike, Chopper, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '67 Triumph Chopper, '69 CB350, '58 BSA Spitfire, '73 CB450

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by chanamagoo View Post
So many responses! You guys are da best.

I have brakes, will defnitely be keeping them on for at least the beginning...baby steps, you know...I have the 3 speed internal hub (has anyone ridden a fixed, but geared bike?), but I have been mainly using the highest gear mostly because I feel like whenever I go lower than that, I'm spinning too fast, but not really moving that fast. I feel like it's just a short jump to single speed...
Brakes are nice to have. I've heard mixed opinions on the S3X hub. Not sure if I would trust it as my only means of stopping, especially in an urban setting (shear a key in the hub or toss/break a chain and your SOL). Plus, if you ever end up in fender-bender/tangle up with a car/pedestrian, having a "legal" bike may keep you out of legal troubles.
ianjk is offline  
Old 11-02-11, 11:30 AM
  #28  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,653

Bikes: 30 frames + 76 wheels

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1189 Post(s)
Liked 576 Times in 334 Posts
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
Be conscious of "pedal strike" when making tight turns, as your inside pedal will pass through its lowest position. So, you'll have to get a sense of how much inward lean is too much, and how to use the periodicity of the pedals to your advantage when turning quickly. You'll get the knack...
The severity of pedal strike is dependent on bottom bracket height and crank arm length. That is why track bikes have higher bottom brackets and shorter crank arms. If the OP is running longer cranks on a road frame, he will need to be very careful when cornering. All of my fixed gear bikes have 165mm cranks and are built on track frames with high bottom brakets. I have a single speed bike with a road frame and 170mm cranks, and have accidentally had pedal stike in a turn when I forgot to coast with the inside pedal up.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 11-02-11, 12:55 PM
  #29  
CJWIZVRDGVNG
ceejay
 
CJWIZVRDGVNG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Posts: 215

Bikes: Mercier Kilo Deluxe

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My advice:

Don't be nervous. It's like riding a bike...
CJWIZVRDGVNG is offline  
Old 11-03-11, 03:32 AM
  #30  
highonpez
Senior Member
 
highonpez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 383

Bikes: 2010 Windsor The Hour, 1982 Fuji Supreme

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'm kinda in the same boat. Just put a flipflop wheelset on my beater single speed and rode it a tiny bit tonight as it was raining and dark. Tomorrow brakes are going on that thing. Then we're going on an adventure. But so far even when I forgot to pedal the worst that happened was I popped out of the seat and then caught the pedal on the downturn. Straps are a nice invention.
highonpez is offline  
Old 11-03-11, 01:23 PM
  #31  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 24,075

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 147 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3194 Post(s)
Liked 2,503 Times in 1,471 Posts
Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie View Post
The severity of pedal strike is dependent on bottom bracket height and crank arm length. That is why track bikes have higher bottom brackets and shorter crank arms.
Also lean angle, which is dependent on speed. The faster you go, the more you can lean in a corner and the more likely you are to strike a pedal.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 11-03-11, 03:07 PM
  #32  
trevor_ash
Happy go lucky
 
trevor_ash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Illinois
Posts: 286

Bikes: 2010 Nagasawa (Track), EAI Bareknuckle (Track), Custom Jonny Cycles (Track), 90's Eddy Merckx (Road), 2002 Colnago Tecnos, 200? Felt F60 (Road), 1992 Schwinn Paramount Series 3 (Road)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CJWIZVRDGVNG View Post
My advice:

Don't be nervous. It's like riding a bike...
That!

And don't worry about all the pedal strike stuff If it happens you'll live.
trevor_ash is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 12:56 AM
  #33  
pkpyro
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 117
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here's a guide to riding fixed that I wrote for my bike club at school. Been riding fixed for two weeks, but my learning curve is very steep... can do seated skids and no hand track stands now.

Tutorial (?):
Baby steps! Transition is important.

1. Pick one gear, and stick with it.
Whether mountain bike or road bike, there usually is one gear that most people are constantly in / switch back and forth from most frequently. Pick that gear or a suitable gear for everyday riding (middle sprocket, small cog on most bikes) and stick with it for a couple weeks. Do NOT touch those shifters!

2. Do not coast.
The "wtf" factor of fixies, according to people who don't know how to ride fixies, is the inability to coast. It makes sense, then, to try riding your bicycle without coasting. On your next trip to the store or school or work, try to constantly keep pedaling. You can coast at corners, but over time, try to take those corners so that your pedals are always on the move.

3. Use foot retention systems
Clips or clipless, use some sort of foot retention system. For reference, most fixie riders go with clips / straps.
Fixed gear riding is easier and makes you feel more connected when your feet are one with the bike.
Grab a cheapo pair from your LBS used bin or your local co-op, or buy your friend a beer and get convince him to upgrade to new straps and give you the old ones. You can upgrade these later. You've got to be able to strap in fairly comfortably. Keep in mind that your pedals will be moving constantly on a fixie. Regardless of bike set-up, most people will forget that their foot is attached and fall a couple times. It's usually less painful to do this on a free wheeled bike.

4. Ride a fixie / SS!
Not what it looks like. This is only if you have a friend that has a fixie / SS. Get a feel for it - Numbers 1-3 were simulations of what it would be like to ride an actual fixie. SS is the closest you can get to a fixie, I suppose.

Conversions are a hassle, especially if you ride fixed for a week and want to switch back. That's a lot of work. If you're buying a new bike, you're going to have to give it away or sell it. Though... in your case with 3-speed hubs, I don't know how that will work.

5. Enjoy!
Now you can ride your own fixie. Enjoy the stealthyness of fixies and pimp it up! Come back to this forum for some advice later on.

Other thoughts:
RUN BRAKES. As other people said, brakes are CRUCIAL in the learning stage. You can pop out no brakes later if you get that comfortable, but if you're riding in traffick, I recommend you run at LEAST a front brake. It's the smart thing, and in most states, it's required by law.

I've never seen geared fixed gears before. Is that even possible? It's an internal hub shifter so I'm not sure how chain tension / all that jazz will work. Be careful and don't do anything crazy for the first couple weeks.

If you want to go brakeless, keep in mind that in the *fingers crossed* case of derailment or other object in your drive terrain (jeans, perhaps?), you lose 100% of your braking ability. You fall in traffic with your feet still in the pedals... that's not a good thing.

Hope this long tutorial helped!

Last edited by pkpyro; 11-04-11 at 01:01 AM. Reason: typo
pkpyro is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 01:45 AM
  #34  
GMJ
Would you just look at it
 
GMJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,554

Bikes: good ones.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts

If you can ride a bike, you can ride a bike fixed. Honestly. It was awkward going around turns fast for like one day.
GMJ is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 03:08 AM
  #35  
highonpez
Senior Member
 
highonpez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 383

Bikes: 2010 Windsor The Hour, 1982 Fuji Supreme

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Went on my first real fixed ride today. About 10 miles. Just take it slow and cautious at first and try not to forget to stop pedaling. Worst thing that happened to me was some mild pedal-strike. It was fun and odd and I'm not sure if I'm hooked yet. We'll see how this goes, but it's nice to know I have a freewheel on the other side.
highonpez is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 05:15 AM
  #36  
bbattle
.
 
bbattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Rocket City, No'ala
Posts: 12,759

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 5.2, 1985 Pinarello Treviso, 1990 Gardin Shred, 2006 Bianchi San Jose

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 23 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by chanamagoo View Post
So many responses! You guys are da best.

I have brakes, will defnitely be keeping them on for at least the beginning...baby steps, you know...I have the 3 speed internal hub (has anyone ridden a fixed, but geared bike?), but I have been mainly using the highest gear mostly because I feel like whenever I go lower than that, I'm spinning too fast, but not really moving that fast. I feel like it's just a short jump to single speed...
How many teeth does your chainring and cog have? If the lower gears on your SA hub feel too easy, get a smaller cog to raise them up. Use this gear calculator to see how different chainring/cog ratios affect the gearing. www.sheldonbrown.com/gears


Originally Posted by chanamagoo View Post
Phil_Gretz, your other bikes are sad. But that actually brings up a good point I was going to ask...at some point...in some other forum somewhere...I'm looking for parts to build up my very own, very first single speed bike...I'll likely keep it until forever because it will be my first one and I'm sentimental and keep everything...I know that there are bike builders who just sit and build bikes just because they love it...but what do they DO with all those bikes they build?

The rule on owning bikes is N +1 with N being the number of bikes you currently own. Just as you wear different clothes for different situations, there is a bike for every occasion. Hang them on the wall, from the ceiling, etc. Ask the Classic and Vintage forum how they manage their stables; some of them have dozens of bikes. I have just 8 now but have had over 12 before. They come and go.


Some other tips for riding fixed: When looking over your shoulder at traffic or that cute girl on the sidewalk, don't forget to pedal. People will often coast in that situation but on a fixie, that'll get you thrown out of the saddle. Also, take corners easier until you get the hang of them because you can't coast and if you lean too far over(going too fast) you'll have a pedalstrike and that can lead to a bad day.
bbattle is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 10:00 AM
  #37  
chanamagoo
Member
Thread Starter
 
chanamagoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Park Slope, Brooklyn
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for all the input, it's really nice to have kind of a running list of things to be careful of when going fixed for the first time...I didnt even KNOW about the pedal strike thing!

pkpyro, that was a very helpful tutorial...thanks! I'm definitely going to invest in straps...and I have been trying to continually pedal on my commutes, though like you said, the corner thing is a little tricksy and I have a hard time maintaining my pedal stroke through turns.

And bbattle, I would never have thought about the looking over your shoulder thing (though, as a single lady of the hetero persuasion, I would probably be checking out the single fella...or lets be honest, his bike...). And I didnt think about getting a smaller cog to raise up the gears a bit...I think the fixed cog has the same number of teeth as what I have on the bike right now, so maybe I'll invest in a smaller cog and see what happens.

I'm definitely going to practice a bit before taking it out onto the open road for a commute...Theres a park a few blocks from my bike shop that I can tool around in for a bit and then head home.

I also appreciate the "It's a bike...just ride it." sentiments...Sometimes I over-think things and then talk myself out of things...a lot of times, I'm a lot more successful if I just DO IT instead of TALKING about doing it...
chanamagoo is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 11:04 AM
  #38  
misskaz
sqrl
 
misskaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,168

Bikes: bieks

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chanamagoo View Post
I also appreciate the "It's a bike...just ride it." sentiments...Sometimes I over-think things and then talk myself out of things...a lot of times, I'm a lot more successful if I just DO IT instead of TALKING about doing it...
Girl, I do this too. I am the Queen of Overthinking Things. I did it about riding fixed (it's no big, you can do it, just DO IT) and I did it about trying cyclocross. Every time, afterwards I think "why did I make such a big deal out of this?"

JUST RIDE YO BIKE. You will love it.
misskaz is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 11:15 AM
  #39  
Street rider
We win all charity rides
 
Street rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Central Michigan University/ GR, MI
Posts: 3,369

Bikes: BMX, fixed gear

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by misskaz View Post
I did it about riding fixed (it's no big, you can do it, just DO IT)
I had the same thing. Especially since I had just gotten on campus, so not being able to coast when I was weaving through people and such. You get used to it, and it becomes not a big deal after only a short time.
Street rider is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 11:16 AM
  #40  
SSbalt
Senior Member
 
SSbalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Baltimore MD
Posts: 241
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So... I started riding fixed gear about a week ago. I was getting really sketched out riding down hills with sharp turns at the bottom. I didn't want to get going too fast to slow myself and hit some gravel or a some small child wandering into my path - so I wussed out and installed a front brake.

I feel like it was the responsible thing to do for myself and others. I just can't skid yet with my noodle legs and 48/15 gearing.

Maybe once I get more comfortable with it I will ditch the brake.
SSbalt is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 01:28 PM
  #41  
GMJ
Would you just look at it
 
GMJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,554

Bikes: good ones.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by SSbalt View Post
so I wussed out and installed a front brake.
Nothing wuss about it. Good for emergencies and if you ever get smoked by a car, your bike is "legal". Don't let anybody tell you different. If someone looks down on you for running a brake, ignore them.
GMJ is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 01:47 PM
  #42  
highonpez
Senior Member
 
highonpez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 383

Bikes: 2010 Windsor The Hour, 1982 Fuji Supreme

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Just installed a back brake to match the front one today. Safety is cool.
highonpez is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 01:54 PM
  #43  
GMJ
Would you just look at it
 
GMJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,554

Bikes: good ones.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
I actually took off my back brake when I converted to fixed. I feel that my feet act as the brake in the rear and the back brake would be redundant. Symmetry is also cool though.
GMJ is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 01:55 PM
  #44  
Accordion
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Orange County - SoCal
Posts: 1,480

Bikes: 2011 Cannondale CAAD10

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I had a pista for awhile and it was really fun. I sold it and still miss it. I have tens of thousands of miles over the past twenty years on geared road bikes but other than my beach cruiser I had more fun on the fixie than anything else. It's not really a problem riding fixed. My body adjusted in about 5 minutes but I did almost get launched in the first corner because I wasn't given any warning and wasn't bright enough to think about how you go on autopilot and coast around corners.

I'm finally looking to get back into it. Thought about picking up the new Pista - I like Bianchi (long story - distant relations from Italy) and I'm an old dude so I'm not really into what's cool. That Kilo TT does look nice and it's $300 cheaper.

I just put on clipless pedals and ride the things stock anyway so it doesn't matter. You'll love it.
Accordion is offline  
Old 11-04-11, 02:26 PM
  #45  
zoltani
sniffin' glue
 
zoltani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,182

Bikes: Surly crosscheck ssfg, Custom vintage french racing bike, Bruce Gordon Rock & Road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by highonpez View Post
Just installed a back brake to match the front one today. Safety is cool.
I run two brakes as well.

FYI...You have to be aware that if you are flying down a hill and you use the rear break even a slight amount of back pressure on the pedals can send you into a skid. This would not be good if you are leaning into a turn and don't expect it.
zoltani is offline  
Old 11-05-11, 05:23 AM
  #46  
highonpez
Senior Member
 
highonpez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 383

Bikes: 2010 Windsor The Hour, 1982 Fuji Supreme

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Word. Always **** around in a parking lot on your new setup before going into the real world.

Originally Posted by GMJ View Post
Symmetry is also cool though.
Ha. I so almost typed that too.
highonpez is offline  
Old 11-05-11, 08:15 AM
  #47  
m4rx12
Senior Member
 
m4rx12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 150

Bikes: Peugot 1980 Road FG Convert

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Definitely invest in some pedal straps for retention. Also rock a brake until/if you feel you are up for brakeless. Might be a good call to wear a helmet too
m4rx12 is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 08:47 PM
  #48  
Velognome 
Get off my lawn!
 
Velognome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Garden State
Posts: 6,253

Bikes: 1917 Loomis, 1923 Rudge, 1930 Hercules Renown, 1947 Mclean, 1948 JA Holland, 1955 Hetchins, 1957 Carlton Flyer, 1962 Raleigh Sport, 1978&81 Raleigh Gomp GS', 2010 Raliegh Clubman

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 87 Times in 44 Posts
[QUOTE][I've heard mixed opinions on the S3X hub/QUOTE]

The first set of Hubs had problems, SA was fast to replace the internals if you asked. Been riding a s3x for 2 years daily, a mix of 10 milers and all day rides. I'm approaching 50 so the 2 lower gears help with aging knees. As mentioned before the learning curve for riding fixed is steep. Just get out and do it, be cautious and in no time it will become second nature.
Velognome is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 09:19 PM
  #49  
party1234
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by trevor_ash View Post
That!

And don't worry about all the pedal strike stuff If it happens you'll live.
Sometimes.
party1234 is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 09:34 PM
  #50  
Velognome 
Get off my lawn!
 
Velognome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Garden State
Posts: 6,253

Bikes: 1917 Loomis, 1923 Rudge, 1930 Hercules Renown, 1947 Mclean, 1948 JA Holland, 1955 Hetchins, 1957 Carlton Flyer, 1962 Raleigh Sport, 1978&81 Raleigh Gomp GS', 2010 Raliegh Clubman

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 87 Times in 44 Posts

Originally Posted by trevor_ash
That!

And don't worry about all the pedal strike stuff If it happens you'll live.




party1234

Sometimes.
but you'll never be the same again
Velognome is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
databike
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
51
01-07-18 07:47 PM
JustinMaster
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
24
05-15-12 07:03 PM
dolphin62
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
23
10-01-11 11:22 AM
gregsteezy
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
24
07-18-11 10:55 AM
episodic
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
26
08-09-10 05:00 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.