Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Big Dude Skinny Tires

Reply

Old 06-29-13, 12:36 AM
  #1  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Big Dude Skinny Tires

Hi everybody, I'm a new user here. I just bought my first bike since my old BMX days in middle school. It's a Critical Cycles fixie, but I'm using the freewheel. I have never ridden a road bike, and my biggest concern is the tires. Like I said, I haven't ridden since middle school, and that was on 20" BMX bikes with fat tires that could hold up to abuse. I'm right around 250 lbs, not sure exactly, and I'm just worried about the tires not being able to handle that much weight.

I guess really I just want someone with experience to tell me it's fine and that I'm not going to bust my face when a tire blows. Or tell me that that's totally going to happen and I'm an idiot for buying a road bike. Either way I'll feel better.

PS: I've been stalking this site for a while now so I've picked up on a few things. No, my bike is not a Kilo TT. I'm a poor college student, leave me alone.
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 12:50 AM
  #2  
Huffandstuff
Senior Member
 
Huffandstuff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Just don't hop curbs and avoid potholes/lift your ass if you are gonna hit one.

You could also throw some 28 or 32c tires just for added measure(if you don't already have them).
Huffandstuff is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 12:57 AM
  #3  
highonpez
Senior Member
 
highonpez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 383

Bikes: 2010 Windsor The Hour, 1982 Fuji Supreme

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Keep 'em pumped up properly and you'll be fine. Also, a little wider couldn't hurt and would make the ride more comfy for you. If your tube does pop you won't fly, you'll just slow down quickly until you realize there's no air in the tire.
highonpez is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 01:27 AM
  #4  
Jaytron
Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter
 
Jaytron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 4,224

Bikes: CAAD 10 4, Dolan DF4, Fuji Track Classic

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You'll be fine, just check your psi before each ride.
Jaytron is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 01:30 AM
  #5  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I appreciate the replies. It really does help my confidence. I should have clarified the current tires it came with are 700x23c. If I went up to a 32 would I also have to replace the rims? I'm pretty much strapped for cash until my school loans come in. I actually sold my computer to buy this bike (determined to lose weight, dammit!)
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 01:32 AM
  #6  
Jaytron
Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter
 
Jaytron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 4,224

Bikes: CAAD 10 4, Dolan DF4, Fuji Track Classic

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You won't have to replace your rims, just make sure the bike has enough clearance.

I prefer 25c tbh. 23c is fine if cash is tight, just watch your psi. Good luck dropping weight. I was 235 when I started and got as low as 179
Jaytron is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 01:47 AM
  #7  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Jaytron View Post
You won't have to replace your rims, just make sure the bike has enough clearance.

I prefer 25c tbh. 23c is fine if cash is tight, just watch your psi. Good luck dropping weight. I was 235 when I started and got as low as 179
Thanks. Cycling is really the only exercise I've ever enjoyed other than swimming, and my apartment pool is too short for decent laps. I'll check out some bigger tires, any particular brands to look at?
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 02:46 AM
  #8  
hairnet
Fresh Garbage
 
hairnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 13,135
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 316 Post(s)
Panaracer is good for quality and fair cost. It's not clear what tire size your bike clear but if this means anything
  • Geometry: Bar Spin Clearance & no Toe Overlap
then 28mm tires shouldnt be a problem, 32mm is a possibility.
hairnet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 03:04 AM
  #9  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Yeah I'm becoming very annoyed with Critical Cycles for not offering proper specs. I'll likely just take it to a shop and get some first hand help as far as clearance.
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 07:06 AM
  #10  
Scrodzilla
See you in Hell.
 
Scrodzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South of Heaven
Posts: 25,949

Bikes: EAI Bare Knuckle

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 573 Post(s)
I recently put a set of 28c tires on a Critical for a customer at the shop. Plenty of clearance.
Scrodzilla is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 09:27 AM
  #11  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Yeah I was in bed when I said I would need to check the clearance. Just looked and there's plenty of space there. I think I'm going to stick to the 23s for now and try to gain some confidence on them. If my school loans come in and I'm still having trouble I'll bump them up. Thanks again everybody.
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 01:16 PM
  #12  
JeremyLC
Senior Member
 
JeremyLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 1,415

Bikes: 2008 Surly Cross Check, 2010 Fuji Track Comp

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
23mm tires should be fine. I was ~250Lbs when I started commuting on a bike with 23mm tires and I didn't have trouble with flats other than road debris. Keep your tires inflated well and they should be fine. Keep riding (and watching your diet) and the weight will come off. (I'm down to about 150Lbs now :-))
JeremyLC is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-13, 02:05 PM
  #13  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,137

Bikes: 29 frames + 72 wheels

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 636 Post(s)
OP - you find this tire pressure .vs. tire size and rider weight helpful:

Tire Width=20: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 63.33
Tire Width=23: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 53.33
Tire Width=25: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 43.33
Tire Width=28: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 33.33
Tire Width=32: Pressure(psi) = (0.17 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 41.67
Tire Width=37: Pressure(psi) = (0.17 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 26.67

Front Pressure = .9*Rear Pressure

So in your case rear tire pressure = (.33 x 250 lbs) + 53.33 = 82.5 + 53.33 = 136 psi, which is probably way more than your tires or rims can handle. Front tire pressure = .9 x 136 psi = 122 psi, which is borderline high, depending on the quality of the tire. Therefore, I'd recommend going with 32mm rear and 28mm front, and inflating them to (.17 x 250 lbs) + 41.67 = 84 psi rear and .9 x [(.33 x 250 lbs) + 33.33 psi] = 104 psi front. Those are approximate numbers of course, but most tires these sizes can handle those pressures.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-13, 09:38 AM
  #14  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Is there any noticeable change in handling having different size tires on the front and back? That's interesting I'd never heard of that before.
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-13, 10:06 AM
  #15  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,137

Bikes: 29 frames + 72 wheels

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 636 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ATX_McKee View Post
Is there any noticeable change in handling having different size tires on the front and back? That's interesting I'd never heard of that before.
Actually, steering and handling is better with a narrower tire up front than in back. There is more weight over the rear wheel than the front, so if you use the same size tires front and rear, you need much higher pressure in the rear than the front. If your rear pressure is too low, you risk a pinch flat. If your front pressure is too high, your ride will be harsh. Also, the rear tire will wear out much quicker than the front if they are the same size. Many of my bikes are set up with a wider tire in the rear than the front. However, the difference is only one size, such as 23/25, 28/32 and 32/35. Most motorcycles are set up this way with a wider tire in the rear than in the front.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-13, 01:48 PM
  #16  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Spinoff question. Will bigger tires give me a little more cushion? The sidewalks and roads here are kinda rough, and my a$$ is taking a beating. Granted, I also need a better seat.
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-13, 02:14 PM
  #17  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,137

Bikes: 29 frames + 72 wheels

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 636 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ATX_McKee View Post
Spinoff question. Will bigger tires give me a little more cushion? The sidewalks and roads here are kinda rough, and my a$$ is taking a beating. Granted, I also need a better seat.
Absolutely. That's why a lot of urban and touring bikes feature fatter tires which can be run at lower pressures to help soak up the bumps w/o significantly increasing rolling resistance. In fact, I just bought a new geared road bike that comes with 700c x 28 tires, and it's a much nicer ride on the Texas chip seal roads. I'm able to run 75 psi front and 85 psi rear with them w/o any risk of pinch flats when I go fast over bad railroad crossings and hit potholes. Of course, I only weigh 140 lbs, so that's plenty of pressure for that size tire.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-13, 02:14 PM
  #18  
hairnet
Fresh Garbage
 
hairnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 13,135
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 316 Post(s)
They will. 28s are nice when the bike is unloaded but at my weight(200lbs) + gear the ride can sometimes still be rough. 35s are pretty smooth but sluggish and I have yet to try out 32mm tires. Of course tire makes also makes a huge difference.

Last edited by hairnet; 06-30-13 at 02:18 PM. Reason: dat spelling
hairnet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-13, 02:21 PM
  #19  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Cool. I think I'm gonna get 32s. Not too worried about the sluggishness, I don't need speed as much as comfort.
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-13, 03:11 AM
  #20  
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 4,227

Bikes: Hillbrick, Malvern Star Oppy S2, Europa (R.I.P.)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 370 Post(s)
Mate, there's no need to change your tyres until they wear out - actually, it'll be the rear one that wears out first. Nothing stopping you changing now of course, but if money is an issue, wear the current ones out first. Whatever you do, don't rush into it, research your options and be aware that shops, both online AND bricks and mortar, have specials, sometimes very good specials just be patient and keep your eyes open.

The physical size of the tyre will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer - a 25mm tyre in one brand/model will be fatter than a 25mm tyre in another.
You will run out of clearance on your frame very quickly. I don't know your bike but it may not like 32mm tyres, the only way to test this is to try it. It's useful knowing someone with the same bike who has done the experiments or someone with fatter tyres who is willing to try his wheels in your bike.
europa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-13, 11:32 AM
  #21  
ATX_McKee
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ATX_McKee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 63

Bikes: Critical Cycles 57 Fixie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I've been riding the 23s for a few days now and they're growing on me. I'm nervous about a lot of things in general, so hopping back on a bike has been difficult. A couple of car crashes really messed up my psyche. But I'm getting more confident so we'll see what happens. I'm not rushing out to buy anything right now, I'm flat broke until school loans come in.

I am having one new issue though. I filled the tires with a compressor and was able to get them to 60psi. The tires don't have a range on the side, they just say fill to 100psi. But they already feel super stiff. Can I just leave them as is? The ride is pretty comfortable so if I don't have to add more air I'd rather not.
ATX_McKee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-13, 11:37 AM
  #22  
Notgrownup
Senior Member
 
Notgrownup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Snow Hill NC
Posts: 872

Bikes: Trek Madone 2.1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I havew 32c on my quick and i am 245lbs... at 85PSI thye are kind of hard but roll good. I would ride those 23c until they burst or wear out just a little pressure tweaking and you will be fine...Fine as frog hair split 4 ways...
Notgrownup is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-13, 11:38 AM
  #23  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: LA
Posts: 9,262

Bikes: Shogun Selectra, Felt TK2, Ridley Fenix AL

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1025 Post(s)
The problem with running skinny tires at low PSI is that you become much more prone to pinch flats, which are a huge pain and often impossible to patch. Fill them to the recommended pressure. It may feel a little more harsh, but you'll save yourself a lot of tubes.
seau grateau is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-13, 11:48 AM
  #24  
hairnet
Fresh Garbage
 
hairnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 13,135
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 316 Post(s)
Before you buy new tires buy yourself a floor pump.
hairnet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-13, 11:50 AM
  #25  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,137

Bikes: 29 frames + 72 wheels

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 636 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ATX_McKee View Post
I am having one new issue though. I filled the tires with a compressor and was able to get them to 60psi. The tires don't have a range on the side, they just say fill to 100psi. But they already feel super stiff. Can I just leave them as is? The ride is pretty comfortable so if I don't have to add more air I'd rather not.
You can't judge tires by how they feel. Skinny tires inflated to 60 psi feel about the same as they do inflated to 100 psi. At your weight, you won't get very far with 60 psi in a 23mm rear tire before you get a pinch flat.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service