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wheel strength question: 32h cassette hub vs 28h SS hub

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wheel strength question: 32h cassette hub vs 28h SS hub

Old 09-21-13, 01:19 PM
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mtb123
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wheel strength question: 32h cassette hub vs 28h SS hub

From what I understand a dished wheel is not as strong as a non-dished wheel given identical rims, spokes, and spoke count. So, I am wondering, given the same rim and spokes, would a wheel built around a 28h SS hub [like the White Industries ENO SS (not the eccentric one)] be stronger than, weaker than, or as strong as a wheel built around a 32h cassette hub?

I would really appreciate the thoughts of any experienced wheel builders out there.

Context
-nature boy SSCX with 130mm spacing
-want a strong but light wheel
-yes I am gram counting so if you don't want to answer a weight-weenie question I understand
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Old 09-21-13, 01:50 PM
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a dished wheel will not be as stiff nor will it stay true as well as a non dished wheel.
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Old 09-21-13, 02:58 PM
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Sure but no body ever said they can't ride their bike because their wheel is dished. If you want to use a threaded on freewheel then go with the appropriate hub and have your symmetrical wheel. If you want to use a freehub, then that's fine too.
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Old 09-21-13, 05:00 PM
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How well the wheel is built will make more difference and if it's built properly, either will do the job without drama.
Being a weight weenie, you'd understand that losing 2gms might make the bike 2gms lighter, but it doesn't affect the bike in the real world, same here.
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Old 09-21-13, 06:51 PM
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Thanks for the feedback. Still wondering which wheel build mentioned in the OP would be stronger. Any experienced wheel builders out there know for a fact?
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Old 09-22-13, 10:35 AM
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mihlbach
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You're asking which wheel will be "stronger". Its not an easy question to answer because it all depends on what you mean by that. Do you mean stiffer, able to hold more weight, able to resist fatigue, or something else? All else being equal, a symmetrically dished wheel is stronger than a dished wheel in just about any way you could define "strength". However, you are comparing wheels with different spoke counts, which makes it really hard to judge. Will the two wheels in question have the same rims and spokes. If so I would guess (from experience riding and building wheels) that the 28 spoke symmetrical wheel is going to be stiffer and more fatigue resistant. I can't say way which wheel would be able to bear more weight. The rim, type of spokes, and quality of the build are going to contribute significantly to the wheels overall properties as well and its hard to give any concrete answers without knowing these variables.

On a personal level, I would prefer the 28 spoke symmetrical wheel, just because its structurally a superior design. There's no point in using a structurally compromised structure if its not necessary. However, both will probably work just fine.

Last edited by mihlbach; 09-22-13 at 10:45 AM.
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Old 09-22-13, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by mihlbach View Post
The rim, type of spokes, and quality of the build are going to contribute significantly to the wheels overall properties as well and its hard to give any concrete answers without knowing these variables.

On a personal level, I would prefer the 28 spoke symmetrical wheel, just because its structurally a superior design. There's no point in using a structurally compromised structure if its not necessary. However, both will probably work just fine.
Thanks. As I said in the original post, I am assuming same rim and same spokes. I will add that I am assuming same wheel builder so I am also holding the quality of the build constant. As far as my definition of strength, I am thinking in terms of how well the wheel will hold up to trail riding and bunny hopping. So I guess my primary "strength" definition would be resistance to fatigue.

I am also aware that both types of wheels will "work" just fine. It's just that when considering a new wheel build I am trying to understand the finer nuances of the trade-offs between strength and weight.

Last edited by mtb123; 09-22-13 at 12:13 PM.
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Old 09-22-13, 01:07 PM
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the simplest description is that all parts the same the loads on a symmetrical wheel are equal the loads on a dished wheel aren't. I will always chose a symmetrical wheel over dished
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